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Evokation
 
 
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-
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-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
-
5
ADDED
18
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
M
=
4
-
5
MINUS
76
22
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
-
4
NONE
48
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
6
SHARED
55
28
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
2
BY
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
E
=
5
-
10
EVERYTHING
133
61
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
M
=
4
-
10
MULTIPLED
121
49
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
-
-
-
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-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
9
ABUNDANCE
65
29
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
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-
-
35
-
58
First Total
995
266
59
-
1
2
3
8
5
6
14
8
18
-
-
3+5
-
5+8
Add to Reduce
9+9+5
2+6+6
5+9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
1+8
-
-
8
-
13
Second Total
23
14
10
-
1
2
3
8
5
6
5
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+3
Reduce to Deduce
2+3
1+4
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
4
Essence of Number
5
5
5
-
1
2
3
8
5
6
5
8
9

 

 

26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
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W
X
Y
Z
-
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-
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-
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-
-
-
-
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-
8
9
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
-
7
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
14
15
-
-
-
19
-
-
-
-
24
-
26
+
=
115
1+1+5
=
7
-
7
-
7
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
7
8
9
-
2
3
4
5
-
7
-
+
=
83
8+3
=
11
1+1
2
-
2
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
10
11
12
13
-
-
16
17
18
-
20
21
22
23
-
25
-
+
=
236
2+3+6
=
11
1+1
2
-
2
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
+
=
351
3+5+1
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
+
=
126
1+2+6
=
9
-
9
-
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
1
occurs
x
3
=
3
-
3
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
2
occurs
x
3
=
6
-
6
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
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-
3
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
3
occurs
x
3
=
9
-
9
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
+
=
4
occurs
x
3
=
12
1+2
3
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
+
=
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
+
=
6
occurs
x
3
=
18
1+8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
+
=
7
occurs
x
3
=
21
2+1
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
+
=
8
occurs
x
3
=
24
2+4
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
45
-
-
26
-
126
-
54
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4+5
-
-
2+6
-
1+2+6
-
5+4
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9

 

 

EVOLVE LOVE EVOLVE

LOVES SOLVE LOVES

EVOLVE LOVE EVOLVE

 

 

D
=
4
-
-
DICTIONARY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
D
4
4
4
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
Y
25
7
7
D
=
4
Q
10
DICTIONARY
118
55
55
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
1+1+8
5+5
5+5
D
=
4
Q
1
DICTIONARY
10
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
1+0
1+0
D
=
4
Q
1
DICTIONARY
1
1
1

 

 

D
=
4
-
-
DICTIONARY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
D
4
4
4
-
-
-
-
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
1
Y
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
D
=
4
Q
10
DICTIONARY
118
55
55
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
1+1+8
5+5
5+5
D
=
4
Q
1
DICTIONARY
10
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
1+0
1+0
D
=
4
Q
1
DICTIONARY
1
1
1

 

 

D
=
4
-
-
DICTIONARY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
D
4
4
4
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
C+T
23
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
O+N+A
30
12
3
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
Y
25
7
7
D
=
4
Q
10
DICTIONARY
118
55
46
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
1+1+8
5+5
4+6
D
=
4
Q
1
DICTIONARY
10
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
1+0
-
D
=
4
Q
1
DICTIONARY
1
1
1

 

 

T
=
2
Q
3
THE
33
15
6
E
=
5
Q
7
ENGLISH
74
38
2
D
=
4
Q
10
DICTIONARY
118
55
1
-
-
11
Q
20
Add to Reduce
225
108
9
Q
Q
1+1
-
2+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+8
1+0+8
-
-
-
2
Q
2
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z = 351 = Z Y X W V U T S R Q P O N M L K J I H G F E D C B A

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z = 126 = Z Y X W V U T S R Q P O N M L K J I H G F E D C B A

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z = 9 = Z Y X W V U T S R Q P O N M L K J I H G F E D C B A

 

 

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQ R STUVWXYZ = 351 = ZYXWVUTS R QPONMLKJ I HGFEDCBA

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQ R STUVWXYZ = 126 = ZYXWVUTS R QPONMLKJ I HGFEDCBA

ABCDEFGH I JKLMNOPQ R STUVWXYZ = 9 = ZYXWVUTS R QPONMLKJ I HGFEDCBA

 

 

www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/algorithm

a procedure for solving a mathematical problem (as of finding the greatest common divisor) in a finite number of steps that frequently involves repetition of an ...

algorithm [ˈælgəˌrɪðəm]
n
1. (Mathematics) a logical arithmetical or computational procedure that if correctly applied ensures the solution of a problem Compare heuristic
2. (Mathematics) Logic Maths a recursive procedure whereby an infinite sequence of terms can be generated Also called algorism
[changed from algorism, through influence of Greek arithmos number]
algorithmic adj
aal·go·rithm (lg-rm)
n.
A step-by-step problem-solving procedure, especially an established, recursive computational procedure for solving a problem in a finite number of steps.
algorithmically adv

algorithm (lg-rthm)
A finite set of unambiguous instructions performed in a prescribed sequence to achieve a goal, especially a mathematical rule or procedure used to compute a desired result. Algorithms are the basis for most computer programming.

Noun 1. algorithm - a precise rule (or set of rules) specifying how to solve some problem
algorithmic program, algorithmic rule
formula, rule - (mathematics) a standard procedure for solving a class of mathematical problems; "he determined the upper bound with Descartes' rule of signs"; "he gave us a general formula for attacking polynomials"
sorting algorithm - an algorithm for sorting a list
stemming algorithm, stemmer - an algorithm for removing inflectional and derivational endings in order to reduce word forms to a common stem algorithm
any methodology for solving a certain kind of problem.
See also: Mathematics

 

 

Algorithm
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Flow chart of an algorithm (Euclid's algorithm) for calculating the greatest common divisor (g.c.d.) of two numbers a and b in locations named A and B. The algorithm proceeds by successive subtractions in two loops: IF the test B ≥ A yields "yes" (or true) (more accurately the number b in location B is greater than or equal to the number a in location A) THEN, the algorithm specifies B ← B − A (meaning the number b − a replaces the old b). Similarly, IF A > B, THEN A ← A − B. The process terminates when (the contents of) B is 0, yielding the g.c.d. in A. (Algorithm derived from Scott 2009:13; symbols and drawing style from Tausworthe 1977).
In mathematics and computer science, an algorithm (i/ˈælɡərɪðəm/) is a step-by-step procedure for calculations. Algorithms are used for calculation, data processing, and automated reasoning.

More precisely, an algorithm is an effective method expressed as a finite list[1] of well-defined instructions[2] for calculating a function.[3] Starting from an initial state and initial input (perhaps empty),[4] the instructions describe a computation that, when executed, will proceed through a finite [5] number of well-defined successive states, eventually producing "output"[6] and terminating at a final ending state. The transition from one state to the next is not necessarily deterministic; some algorithms, known as randomized algorithms, incorporate random input.[7]

Though al-Khwārizmī's algorism referred to the rules of performing arithmetic using Hindu-Arabic numerals and the systematic solution of linear and quadratic equations, a partial formalization of what would become the modern algorithm began with attempts to solve the Entscheidungsproblem (the "decision problem") posed by David Hilbert in 1928. Subsequent formalizations were framed as attempts to define "effective calculability"[8] or "effective method";[9] those formalizations included the Gödel–Herbrand–Kleene recursive functions of 1930, 1934 and 1935, Alonzo Church's lambda calculus of 1936, Emil Post's "Formulation 1" of 1936, and Alan Turing's Turing machines of 1936–7 and 1939. Giving a formal definition of algorithms, corresponding to the intuitive notion, remains a challenging problem.[10]

Informal definition
For a detailed presentation of the various points of view around the definition of "algorithm" see Algorithm characterizations. For examples of simple addition algorithms specified in the detailed manner described in Algorithm characterizations, see Algorithm examples.
While there is no generally accepted formal definition of "algorithm," an informal definition could be "a set of rules that precisely defines a sequence of operations."[11] For some people, a program is only an algorithm if it stops eventually; for others, a program is only an algorithm if it stops before a given number of calculation steps.[12]

A prototypical example of an algorithm is Euclid's algorithm to determine the maximum common divisor of two integers; an example (there are others) is described by the flow chart above and as an example in a later section.

Boolos & Jeffrey (1974, 1999) offer an informal meaning of the word in the following quotation:

No human being can write fast enough, or long enough, or small enough† ( †"smaller and smaller without limit ...you'd be trying to write on molecules, on atoms, on electrons") to list all members of an enumerably infinite set by writing out their names, one after another, in some notation. But humans can do something equally useful, in the case of certain enumerably infinite sets: They can give explicit instructions for determining the nth member of the set, for arbitrary finite n. Such instructions are to be given quite explicitly, in a form in which they could be followed by a computing machine, or by a human who is capable of carrying out only very elementary operations on symbols.[13]

The term "enumerably infinite" means "countable using integers perhaps extending to infinity." Thus, Boolos and Jeffrey are saying that an algorithm implies instructions for a process that "creates" output integers from an arbitrary "input" integer or integers that, in theory, can be chosen from 0 to infinity. Thus an algorithm can be an algebraic equation such as y = m + n—two arbitrary "input variables" m and n that produce an output y. But various authors' attempts to define the notion indicate that the word implies much more than this, something on the order of (for the addition example):
Precise instructions (in language understood by "the computer")[14] for a fast, efficient, "good"[15] process that specifies the "moves" of "the computer" (machine or human, equipped with the necessary internally contained information and capabilities)[16] to find, decode, and then process arbitrary input integers/symbols m and n, symbols + and = ... and "effectively"[17] produce, in a "reasonable" time,[18] output-integer y at a specified place and in a specified format.
The concept of algorithm is also used to define the notion of decidability. That notion is central for explaining how formal systems come into being starting from a small set of axioms and rules. In logic, the time that an algorithm requires to complete cannot be measured, as it is not apparently related with our customary physical dimension. From such uncertainties, that characterize ongoing work, stems the unavailability of a definition of algorithm that suits both concrete (in some sense) and abstract usage of the term.

[edit] Formalization

Algorithms are essential to the way computers process data. Many computer programs contain algorithms that detail the specific instructions a computer should perform (in a specific order) to carry out a specified task, such as calculating employees' paychecks or printing students' report cards. Thus, an algorithm can be considered to be any sequence of operations that can be simulated by a Turing-complete system. Authors who assert this thesis include Minsky (1967), Savage (1987) and Gurevich (2000):

Minsky: "But we will also maintain, with Turing . . . that any procedure which could "naturally" be called effective, can in fact be realized by a (simple) machine. Although this may seem extreme, the arguments . . . in its favor are hard to refute".[19]

Gurevich: "...Turing's informal argument in favor of his thesis justifies a stronger thesis: every algorithm can be simulated by a Turing machine ... according to Savage [1987], an algorithm is a computational process defined by a Turing machine".[20]

Typically, when an algorithm is associated with processing information, data is read from an input source, written to an output device, and/or stored for further processing. Stored data is regarded as part of the internal state of the entity performing the algorithm. In practice, the state is stored in one or more data structures.

For some such computational process, the algorithm must be rigorously defined: specified in the way it applies in all possible circumstances that could arise. That is, any conditional steps must be systematically dealt with, case-by-case; the criteria for each case must be clear (and computable).

Because an algorithm is a precise list of precise steps, the order of computation will always be critical to the functioning of the algorithm. Instructions are usually assumed to be listed explicitly, and are described as starting "from the top" and going "down to the bottom", an idea that is described more formally by flow of control.

So far, this discussion of the formalization of an algorithm has assumed the premises of imperative programming. This is the most common conception, and it attempts to describe a task in discrete, "mechanical" means. Unique to this conception of formalized algorithms is the assignment operation, setting the value of a variable. It derives from the intuition of "memory" as a scratchpad. There is an example below of such an assignment.

For some alternate conceptions of what constitutes an algorithm see functional programming and logic programming.

[edit] Expressing algorithms

Algorithms can be expressed in many kinds of notation, including natural languages, pseudocode, flowcharts, programming languages or control tables (processed by interpreters). Natural language expressions of algorithms tend to be verbose and ambiguous, and are rarely used for complex or technical algorithms. Pseudocode, flowcharts and control tables are structured ways to express algorithms that avoid many of the ambiguities common in natural language statements. Programming languages are primarily intended for expressing algorithms in a form that can be executed by a computer, but are often used as a way to define or document algorithms.

There is a wide variety of representations possible and one can express a given Turing machine program as a sequence of machine tables (see more at finite state machine, state transition table and control table), as flowcharts (see more at state diagram), or as a form of rudimentary machine code or assembly code called "sets of quadruples" (see more at Turing machine).

Representations of algorithms can be classed into three accepted levels of Turing machine description:[21]
1 High-level description:
"...prose to describe an algorithm, ignoring the implementation details. At this level we do not need to mention how the machine manages its tape or head." 2 Implementation description:
"...prose used to define the way the Turing machine uses its head and the way that it stores data on its tape. At this level we do not give details of states or transition function." 3 Formal description:
Most detailed, "lowest level", gives the Turing machine's "state table". For an example of the simple algorithm "Add m+n" described in all three levels see Algorithm examples.
[edit] Implementation

Most algorithms are intended to be implemented as computer programs. However, algorithms are also implemented by other means, such as in a biological neural network (for example, the human brain implementing arithmetic or an insect looking for food), in an electrical circuit, or in a mechanical device.

[edit] Computer algorithms

Flowchart examples of the canonical Böhm-Jacopini structures: the SEQUENCE (rectangles descending the page), the WHILE-DO and the IF-THEN-ELSE. The three structures are made of the primitive conditional GOTO (IF test=true THEN GOTO step xxx) (a diamond), the unconditional GOTO (rectangle), various assignment operators (rectangle), and HALT (rectangle). Nesting of these structures inside assignment-blocks result in complex diagrams (cf Tausworthe 1977:100,114).
In computer systems, an algorithm is basically an instance of logic written in software by software developers to be effective for the intended "target" computer(s), in order for the target machines to produce output from given input (perhaps null).

"Elegant" (compact) programs, "good" (fast) programs : The notion of "simplicity and elegance" appears informally in Knuth and precisely in Chaitin:
Knuth: ". . .we want good algorithms in some loosely defined aesthetic sense. One criterion . . . is the length of time taken to perform the algorithm . . .. Other criteria are adaptability of the algorithm to computers, its simplicity and elegance, etc"[22] Chaitin: " . . . a program is 'elegant,' by which I mean that it's the smallest possible program for producing the output that it does"[23]
Chaitin prefaces his definition with: "I'll show you can't prove that a program is 'elegant'"—such a proof would solve the Halting problem (ibid).

Algorithm versus function computable by an algorithm: For a given function multiple algorithms may exist. This will be true, even without expanding the available instruction set available to the programmer. Rogers observes that "It is . . . important to distinguish between the notion of algorithm, i.e. procedure and the notion of function computable by algorithm, i.e. mapping yielded by procedure. The same function may have several different algorithms".[24]

Unfortunately there may be a tradeoff between goodness (speed) and elegance (compactness)—an elegant program may take more steps to complete a computation than one less elegant. An example of using Euclid's algorithm will be shown below.

Computers (and computors), models of computation: A computer (or human "computor"[25]) is a restricted type of machine, a "discrete deterministic mechanical device"[26] that blindly follows its instructions.[27] Melzak's and Lambek's primitive models[28] reduced this notion to four elements: (i) discrete, distinguishable locations, (ii) discrete, indistinguishable counters[29] (iii) an agent, and (iv) a list of instructions that are effective relative to the capability of the agent.[30]

Minsky describes a more congenial variation of Lambek's "abacus" model in his "Very Simple Bases for Computability".[31] Minsky's machine proceeds sequentially through its five (or six depending on how one counts) instructions unless either a conditional IF–THEN GOTO or an unconditional GOTO changes program flow out of sequence. Besides HALT, Minsky's machine includes three assignment (replacement, substitution)[32] operations: ZERO (e.g. the contents of location replaced by 0: L ← 0), SUCCESSOR (e.g. L ← L+1), and DECREMENT (e.g. L ← L − 1).[33] Rarely will a programmer have to write "code" with such a limited instruction set. But Minsky shows (as do Melzak and Lambek) that his machine is Turing complete with only four general types of instructions: conditional GOTO, unconditional GOTO, assignment/replacement/substitution, and HALT.[34]

Simulation of an algorithm: computer (computor) language: Knuth advises the reader that "the best way to learn an algorithm is to try it . . . immediately take pen and paper and work through an example".[35] But what about a simulation or execution of the real thing? The programmer must translate the algorithm into a language that the simulator/computer/computor can effectively execute. Stone gives an example of this: when computing the roots of a quadratic equation the computor must know how to take a square root. If they don't then for the algorithm to be effective it must provide a set of rules for extracting a square root.[36]

This means that the programmer must know a "language" that is effective relative to the target computing agent (computer/computor).

But what model should be used for the simulation? Van Emde Boas observes "even if we base complexity theory on abstract instead of concrete machines, arbitrariness of the choice of a model remains. It is at this point that the notion of simulation enters".[37] When speed is being measured, the instruction set matters. For example, the subprogram in Euclid's algorithm to compute the remainder would execute much faster if the programmer had a "modulus" (division) instruction available rather than just subtraction (or worse: just Minsky's "decrement").

Structured programming, canonical structures: Per the Church-Turing thesis any algorithm can be computed by a model known to be Turing complete, and per Minsky's demonstrations Turing completeness requires only four instruction types—conditional GOTO, unconditional GOTO, assignment, HALT. Kemeny and Kurtz observe that while "undisciplined" use of unconditional GOTOs and conditional IF-THEN GOTOs can result in "spaghetti code" a programmer can write structured programs using these instructions; on the other hand "it is also possible, and not too hard, to write badly structured programs in a structured language".[38] Tausworthe augments the three Böhm-Jacopini canonical structures:[39] SEQUENCE, IF-THEN-ELSE, and WHILE-DO, with two more: DO-WHILE and CASE.[40] An additional benefit of a structured program will be one that lends itself to proofs of correctness using mathematical induction.[41]

Canonical flowchart symbols[42]: The graphical aide called a flowchart offers a way to describe and document an algorithm (and a computer program of one). Like program flow of a Minsky machine, a flowchart always starts at the top of a page and proceeds down. Its primary symbols are only 4: the directed arrow showing program flow, the rectangle (SEQUENCE, GOTO), the diamond (IF-THEN-ELSE), and the dot (OR-tie). The Böhm-Jacopini canonical structures are made of these primitive shapes. Sub-structures can "nest" in rectangles but only if a single exit occurs from the superstructure. The symbols and their use to build the canonical structures are shown in the diagram.

 

 

EVOLVE LOVE EVOLVE

LOVES SOLVE LOVES

EVOLVE LOVE EVOLVE

 

 

Algorithm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algorithm

In mathematics and computer science, an algorithm is a step-by-step procedure for calculations. Algorithms are used for calculation, data processing, and ...

 

A
=
1
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
4
A
=
1
-
10
ALGORITHMS
122
59
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
-
ALGORITHMS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
-
-
1
H
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
1
M+S
32
14
5
A
=
1
-
10
ALGORITHMS
122
59
50
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
1+2+2
5+9
5+0
A
=
1
-
1
ALGORITHMS
5
14
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
A
=
1
-
1
ALGORITHMS
5
5
5

 

 

-
10
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
9
-
8
-
1
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
15
-
9
-
8
-
19
+
=
51
5+1
=
6
=
6
-
10
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
3
7
-
9
-
2
-
4
-
+
=
26
2+6
=
8
=
8
-
-
1
12
7
-
18
-
20
-
13
-
+
=
71
7+1
=
8
=
8
-
10
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
12
7
15
18
9
20
8
13
19
+
=
122
1+2+2
=
5
1+0
5
-
-
1
3
7
6
9
9
2
8
4
1
+
=
50
5+0
=
5
1+0
5
-
10
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
5
10
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
27
-
-
10
-
41
-
1+0
-
-
-
-
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+7
-
-
1+0
-
4+1
5
1
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
9
-
-
1
-
5
-
-
1
3
7
6
9
9
2
8
4
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
1
A
L
G
O
R
I
T
H
M
S
-
-
9
-
-
1
-
5

 

 

A
=
1
-
10
ALGORITHMS
122
59
5
A
=
1
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ALGORITHM
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
L
=
3
-
1
L
12
3
3
G
=
7
-
1
G
7
7
7
O
=
6
-
1
O
15
6
6
R
=
9
-
1
R
18
9
9
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
T
=
2
-
1
T
20
2
2
H
=
8
-
1
H
8
8
8
M
=
4
-
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
49
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
49
-
-
4+9
-
-
-
1+0+3
4+9
4+9
-
-
13
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
13
13
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
-
4
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
4
4

 

 

A
=
1
-
10
ALGORITHMS
122
59
5
A
=
1
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ALGORITHM
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
T
=
2
-
1
T
20
2
2
L
=
3
-
1
L
12
3
3
M
=
4
-
1
M
13
4
4
5
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
5
O
=
6
-
1
O
15
6
6
G
=
7
-
1
G
7
7
7
H
=
8
-
1
H
8
8
8
R
=
9
-
1
R
18
9
9
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
49
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
49
-
-
4+9
-
-
-
1+0+3
4+9
4+9
-
-
13
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
13
13
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
-
4
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
4
4

 

 

A
=
1
-
10
ALGORITHMS
122
59
5
A
=
1
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ALGORITHM
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
L
=
3
-
1
L
12
3
3
G
=
7
-
1
G
7
7
7
O
=
6
-
1
O
15
6
6
R
=
9
-
1
R
18
9
9
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
T
=
2
-
1
T
20
2
2
H
=
8
-
1
H
8
8
8
M
=
4
-
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
49
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
49
49
-
-
4+9
-
-
-
1+0+3
4+9
4+9
-
-
13
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
13
13
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+3
1+3
-
-
4
-
9
ALGORITHM
103
4
4

 

 

-
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
1
12
7
5
2
18
1
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
-
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
1
12
7
5
2
18
1
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
-
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
12
7
5
2
18
1
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
-
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
1
=
5
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
SIX
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
18
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
27
-
-
7
-
28
1+8
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
2+7
-
-
-
-
2+8
9
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
9
-
-
7
-
10
-
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
9
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
9
-
-
7
-
1

 

 

7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
12
7
5
2
18
1
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
12
7
5
2
18
1
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
12
7
5
2
18
1
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
1
=
5
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
27
-
-
7
-
28
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
2+7
-
-
-
-
2+8
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
9
-
-
7
-
10
-
1
3
7
5
2
9
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
7
A
L
G
E
B
R
A
-
-
9
-
-
7
-
1

 

 

ADVENT 1133 ADVENT

 

 

GLORY FOLLOWS VIRTUE AS IF IT WAS ITS SHADOW

MARCUS TULLIUS CICERO

Marcus Tullius Cicero was born on January 3, 106 BC and was murdered on December 7, 43 BC.

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
M
=
1
-
6
MARCUS
75
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
7
TULLIUS
114
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
C
=
5
-
6
CICERO
53
35
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
8
-
19
First Total
242
80
17
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+9
Add to Reduce
2+4+2
8+0
1+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
10
Second Total
8
8
8
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+9
Reduce to Deduce
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
7
Essence of Number
8
8
8
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
G
=
7
-
5
GLORY
77
32
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
F
=
6
-
7
FOLLOWS
93
30
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
V
=
4
-
6
VIRTUE
95
32
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
2
AS
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IF
15
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IT
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
4
WERE
51
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
3
IT'S
48
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
6
SHADOW
70
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
51
-
37
First Total
498
183
39
-
1
4
6
2
10
12
7
8
9
-
-
5+1
-
3+7
Add to Reduce
4+9+8
1+8+3
3+9
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
1+2
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
7
Second Total
12
12
12
-
1
4
6
2
1
3
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+2
1+2
1+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
1
Essence of Number
3
3
3
-
1
4
6
2
1
3
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
M
=
1
-
6
MARCUS
75
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
7
TULLIUS
114
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
C
=
5
-
6
CICERO
53
35
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
8
-
19
First Total
242
80
17
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+9
Add to Reduce
2+4+2
8+0
1+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
10
Second Total
8
8
8
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+9
Reduce to Deduce
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
7
Essence of Number
8
8
8
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
MARCUS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
M+A+R
32
14
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
6
MARCUS
75
30
21
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
TULLIUS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
T+S
39
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
L
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
L
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
I+U
30
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
7
TULLIUS
114
24
15
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
CICERO
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
C+I
12
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
E+R+O
38
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
C
=
3
-
6
CICERO
53
35
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
19
First Total
242
80
17
-
1
2
27
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+9
Add to Reduce
2+4+2
8+0
1+7
-
-
-
2+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
10
Second Total
8
8
8
-
1
2
9
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
1
Essence of Number
8
8
8
-
1
2
9
4
5
6
7
8
9

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
31
15
6
R
=
9
-
7
REALITY
90
36
9
W
=
5
-
6
WITHIN
83
38
2
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
P
=
7
-
7
PATTERN
94
31
4
-
-
25
Q
26
Add to Reduce
333
135
27
-
-
2+5
-
2+6
Reduce to Deduce
3+3+3
1+3+5
2+7
-
-
7
-
8
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

LOOK AT THE THREES LOOK AT THE THREES LOOK AT THE THREES THE THREES THE THREES

 

O
=
6
-
-
THREES
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
-
-
1
H
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
2
S
19
10
1
O
=
6
Q
6
THREES
75
39
30
-
-
-
-
-
-
7+4
3+9
3+0
O
=
6
Q
6
THREES
12
12
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+2
1+2
-
O
=
6
Q
6
THREES
3
3
3

 

 

C
=
3
-
-
CULL
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
C
=
3
Q
4
CULL
48
12
12
-
-
-
-
-
-
4+8
1+2
1+2
C
=
3
Q
4
CULL
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+2
-
-
C
=
3
Q
4
CULL
3
3
3

 

 

C
=
3
-
-
CULT
56
11
2
C
=
3
-
-
CULTS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
2
T+S
39
12
3
C
=
3
Q
5
CULTS
75
21
12
-
-
-
-
-
-
7+5
2+1
1+2
C
=
3
Q
5
CULTS
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+2
-
-
C
=
3
Q
5
CULTS
3
3
3

 

 

O
=
6
-
-
OCCULT
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
-
2
T
20
2
2
O
=
6
Q
6
OCCULT
74
20
20
-
-
-
-
-
-
7+4
2+0
2+0
O
=
6
Q
6
OCCULT
11
2
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+1
-
-
O
=
6
Q
6
OCCULT
2
2
2

 

 

-
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
6
-
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
15
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
3
3
3
2
+
=
14
1+4
=
5
=
5
=
5
-
-
-
3
3
21
12
20
+
=
59
5+9
=
14
1+4
5
=
5
-
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
3
3
21
12
20
+
=
74
7+4
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
-
6
3
3
3
3
2
+
=
20
2+0
=
2
=
2
=
2
-
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
ONE
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
3
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
4
=
12
1+2
3
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
-
-
34
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
11
-
-
6
-
20
-
11
3+4
-
-
3
3
3
3
-
-
-
1+1
-
-
-
-
2+0
-
1+1
7
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
2
-
-
6
-
2
-
2
-
-
6
3
3
3
3
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
2
-
-
6
-
2
-
2

 

 

6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
6
-
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
15
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
=
6
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
3
3
3
2
+
=
14
1+4
=
5
=
5
=
5
-
-
3
3
21
12
20
+
=
59
5+9
=
14
1+4
5
=
5
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
3
3
21
12
20
+
=
74
7+4
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
6
3
3
3
3
2
+
=
20
2+0
=
2
=
2
=
2
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
3
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
4
=
12
1+2
3
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
11
-
-
6
-
20
-
11
-
-
3
3
3
3
-
-
-
1+1
-
-
-
-
2+0
-
1+1
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
2
-
-
6
-
2
-
2
-
6
3
3
3
3
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
O
C
C
U
L
T
-
-
2
-
-
6
-
2
-
2

 

The

FULCANELLI

Phenomenon

Kenneth Rayner Johnson 1980

The Praxis

Page 190

Theoretical physics has become more and more occult, cheerfully breaking every previously sacrosanct law of nature and leaning towards such supernatural concepts as holes in space, negative mass and time flowing backwards ... The greatest physicists ... have been groping towards a synthesis of physics and parapsychology. -

Arthur Koestler: The Roots of Coincidence, (Hutchinson, 1972.)

 

THIS IS THE SCENE OF THE SCENE UNSEEN

THE UNSEEN SEEN OF THE SCENE UNSEEN THIS IS THE SCENE

 

 

NETERS TEN NET ENTERS

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
4
MIND
40
22
4
2
OF
21
12
3
9
HUMANKIND
95
41
5
18
First Total
189
90
18
1+8
Add to Reduce
1+8+9
9+0
1+8
9
Second Total
18
9
9
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

ADDED TO ALL MINUS NONE SHARED BY EVERYTHING MULTIPLIED IN ABUNDANCE

 

 

8
-
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
+
+
=
180
1+8+0
=
9
9
-
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
+
=
126
1+2+6
=
9
9
-
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
+
=
5
=
=
5
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
6
-
-
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
-
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
45
-
-
9
9
-
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
-
-
4+5
-
-
-
-
-
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
-
-
9
-
=
9
9
-
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
-
-
-
9
-
=
9
9
-
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

 

 

REAL REALITY REVEALED HAVE I MENTIONED GODS DIVINE THOUGHT HAVE I MENTIONED

THAT

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

4

 

 

-
REAL
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
3
E+A+L
18
9
9
4
REAL
36
18
18
-
-
3+6
1+8
1+8
4
REAL
9
9
9

 

 

-
REALITY
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
3
E+A+L
18
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
2
T+Y
45
9
9
7
REALITY
90
36
36
-
-
9+0
3+6
3+6
7
REALITY
9
9
9

 

 

-
REVEALED
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
2
E+V
27
9
9
3
E+A+L
18
9
9
2
E+D
9
9
9
8
REVEALED
72
36
36
-
-
7+2
3+6
3+6
8
REVEALED
9
9
9

 

 

-
REAL
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
3
E+A+L
18
9
9
-
REALITY
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
3
E+A+L
18
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
2
T+Y
45
9
9
12
REVEALED
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
2
E+V
27
9
9
3
E+A+L
18
9
9
2
E+D
9
9
9
19
First Total
198
90
36
1+9
Add to Reduce
1+9+8
9+0
3+6
10
Second Total
18
9
9
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
1
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
REAL REALITY REVEALED
-
-
-
R
=
18
=
9
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
E+A+L
18
9
9
R
=
18
=
9
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
E+A+L
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
T+Y
45
9
9
R
=
18
=
9
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
E+V
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
E+A+L
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
E+D
9
9
9
-
-
54
-
27
REAL REALITY REVEALED
-
-
-
-
-
5+4
-
2+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
9
REAL REALITY REVEALED
-
-
-

 

......

4
GODS
45
18
9
6
SPIRIT
91
37
1
4
IRIS
55
28
1
4
ISIS
56
20
2
6
OSIRIS
89
35
8
6
VISHNU
93
30
3
5
SHIVA
59
59
5
7
KRISHNA
80
35
8
7
SHRISTI
102
39
3
5
RISHI
63
36
9
6
CHRIST
77
32
5
4
ISHI
45
27
9
6
SAPTARSHI
77
32
5

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
I
=
9
-
7
ILLNESS
90
36
9
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
I
=
9
-
8
ILLUSION
111
39
3
-
-
28
Q
23
First Total
396
135
27
-
-
2+8
-
2+3
Add to Reduce
3+9+6
1+3+5
2+7
-
-
10
-
5
Second Total
18
9
9
-
-
1+0
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
-
-
1
-
5
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL

 

 

A
=
1
8
ALLELUIA
73
28
1
H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
90
36
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
HALLELLUJAH
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
H+A
9
9
9
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
1
J
10
1
1
-
-
-
2
A+H
13
4
9
H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
90
36
9
-
-
-
-
-
9+0
3+6
-
H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
9
9
9

 

 

A
=
1
8
ALLELUIA
73
28
1
H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
90
36
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
HALLELLUJAH
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
H+A
9
9
9
-
-
-
2
L+L
24
6
6
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
3
L+L+U
45
9
9
-
-
-
1
J
10
1
1
-
-
-
2
A+H
9
9
9
H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
90
36
9
-
-
-
-
-
9+0
3+6
-
H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
9
9
9

 

 

H
=
8
11
HALLELLUJAH
90
36
9
A
=
1
8
ALLELUIA
73
28
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ALLELLUIA
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
1
A
1
1
1
A
=
1
8
ALLELUIA
73
28
28
-
-
-
-
-
7+3
2+8
2+8
A
=
1
8
ALLELUIA
10
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
1+0
1+0
A
=
1
8
ALLELUIA
1
1
1

 

 

Alleluia (chant) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alleluia_(chant)

The word "Alleluia" or "Hallelujah" (from Hebrew הללו יה), which literally means "Praise ye Yah" or "Praise Jah, you people", is used in different ways in Christian ...

The word "Alleluia" or "Hallelujah" (from Hebrew הללו יה), which literally means "Praise ye Yah" or "Praise Jah, you people",[1][2] is used in different ways in Christian liturgies. "Praise Jah" is a short form of "Praise Yahweh",[3][4][5] or of "praise ye Jehovah".[6]

In the spelling "Alleluia", the term is used also to refer to a liturgical chant in which that word is combined with verses of Scripture, usually from the Psalms. This chant is commonly used before the proclamation of the Gospel.

[edit] History
The Hebrew word Halleluya as an expression of praise to God was preserved, untranslated, by the Early Christians as a superlative expression of thanksgiving, joy, and triumph. Thus it appears in the ancient Greek Liturgy of St. James, which is still used to this day by the Patriarch of Jerusalem and, in its Syriac recension is the prototype of that used by the Maronites. In the Liturgy of St. Mark, apparently the most ancient of all, we find this rubric: "Then follow Let us attend, the Apostle, and the Prologue of the Alleluia."—the "Apostle" is the usual ancient Eastern title for the Epistle reading, and the "Prologue of the Alleluia" would seem to be a prayer or verse before Alleluia was sung by the choir.

 

Eleleu-ih or Alleluia

yahwehism.com/html/eleleu-ih.html

What does eleleu ih, eleleu ie mean? "Eleleu!" is a cry of encouragement (from elelizo ele-lizo, meaning God or a god from ele (elohim) and "lizo" who lives (one ...

 

eleleu - Word in Context

wordincontext.com/en/eleleu

The ancient Greeks joined in battle with shouts of "Eleleu!" The Welsh cry was "Ubub!" from whence comes our word hubbub, meaning a confusion. The Irish war ..

 

 

Yahweh and Jehowah are not names of God!!! That's another ...

www.godlikeproductions.com/forum1/message1639400/pg1

31 posts - 6 authors - 15 Sep 2011
Of course not! What does eleleu ih, eleleu ie mean? "Eleleu!" is a cry of encouragement (from elelizo ele-lizo, meaning God or a god from ele ...

Definition of eleleus. Meaning of eleleus. Synonyms of eleleus

www.wordaz.com/eleleus.html

... for eleleus definition. You find here eleleus meaning, synonyms of eleleus and images for eleleus. ... Meaning of eleleu from wikipedia. - calisto eleleus is a ...

 

 

-
ELELEU
-
-
-
-
E+L
17
8
8
-
E+L
17
8
8
-
E+U
26
8
8
6
ELELEU
60
24
24
-
-
6+0
2+4
2+4
6
ELELEU
6
6
6

 

 

-
ELELEU
-
-
-
-
535353
-
-
-
-
5+3
8
8
8
-
5+3
8
8
8
-
5+3
8
8
8
6
ELELEU
24
24
24
-
-
2+4
2+4
2+4
6
ELELEU
6
6
6

 

 

12
ELELEU ELELEU
120
48
3
9
HALLELUIA
81
36
9
10
HALLELUJAH
90
36
9

 

Hallelujah, Halleluyah, or Alleluia, is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְלוּיָהּ (Standard Hebrew Halləluya, Tiberian Hebrew Halləlûyāh) ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hallelujah -

Hallelujah, Halleluyah, or Alleluia, is a transliteration of the Hebrew word הַלְלוּיָהּ (Standard Hebrew Halləluya, Tiberian Hebrew Halləlûyāh) meaning "[Let us] praise (הַלְּלוּ) Jah (Yah) (יָהּ)" (Sometimes rendered as "Praise (הַלְּלוּ) [the] LORD (יָהּ) or God"). It is found mainly in the book of Psalms. It has been accepted into the English language. The word is used in Judaism as part of the Hallel prayers. Alleluia is the Latin form of the word; it is used by Anglicans and Catholics in preference to Hallelujah.

For most Christians, "Hallelujah" is considered the most joyful word of praise to God, rather than an injunction to praise Him. In many denominations, the Alleluia, along with the Gloria in Excelsis Deo, is not spoken or sung during the season of Lent, instead being replaced by a Lenten acclamation.

Halleluyah is a composite of Hallelu and Jah (Yah). It literally translates from Hebrew as "Praise Jah, [third-person plural]!" or simply "Praise Jah!" Jah is the shortened form of the name Jehovah (Yahweh), referred to as the Tetragrammaton.

The term is used 24 times in the Hebrew Bible (mainly in the book of Psalms (e.g. 111-117), where it starts and concludes a number of Psalms) and four times in Greek transliteration in Revelation.

 

Hallelujah Lyrics by Jeff Buckley at the Lyrics Depot ... Lyrics Depot is your source of music song lyrics. Try visiting our partners to ...

www.lyricsdepot.com/jeff-buckley/hallelujah.html www.lyricsdepot.com/jeff-buckley/hallelujah.html

 

(L. Cohen)
Originally contained in Leonard Cohen's Various Positions

I heard there was a secret chord
that David playedand it pleased the Lord
But you don't really care for music, do you?
Well it goes like this :
The fourth, the fifth, the minor fall and the major lift
The baffled king composing Hallelujah

Hallelujah Hallelujah Hallelujah Hallelujah...

Well your faith was strong but you needed proof
You saw her bathing on the roof
Her beauty and the moonlight overthrough ya
She tied you to her kitchen chair
She broke your throne and she cut your hair
And from your lips she drew the Hallelujah

I've seen this room and I've walked this floor
I used to live alone before I knew ya
I've seen your flag on the marble arch
But love is not a victory march
It's a cold and it's a broken Hallelujah

There was a time when you let me know
What's really going on below
But now you never show that to me do ya
But remember when I moved in you
And the holy dove was moving too
And every breath we drew was Hallelujah

Well, maybe there's a God above
But all I've ever learned from love
Was how to shoot somebody who outdrew ya
It's not a cry that you hear at night
It's not somebody who's seen the light
It's a cold and it's a broken Hallelujah

Hallelujah Hallelujah Hallelujah...

 

 

COLLINS GEM DICTIONARY OF THE BIBLE

Rev. James L. Dow 1964

Page 208

Hallel [hall-el]. Lit, 'praise.' A name given to certain Psalms in which' Hallelujah' keeps recurring. There is the Egyptian Hallel (Ps. 1] 3­118) and the Great Hallel (Ps. 120-136). These were sung at the great festivals.
Hallelujah. 'Praise ye the Lord' normally occurs at the beginning or end or both of the Psalm, The exception is 035, 3). Prob. it should only be a heading indicating that certain Psalms arc particularly suitable for synagogue praise. When taken into NT trans. ' Praise ye the Lord.'

 

6
PRAISE
68
32
5
2
YE
30
12
3
3
THE
33
15
6
4
LORD
49
22
4
15
-
180
81
18
1+5
-
1+8+0
8+1
1+8
6
-
9
9
9

 

 

"Hallelujah" is a song written by Leonard Cohen. It was first recorded on his 1984 album Various Positions. It has been covered numerous times and featured ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hallelujah_(song)

"Hallelujah"is a song written by Leonard Cohen. It was first recorded on his 1984 album Various Positions. It has been covered numerous times and featured in the soundtracks of several movies and television shows.

 

-
HALLELUJAH
-
-
-
-
H+A
9
9
9
-
L+L+E+L+U+J
72
18
9
-
A+H
9
9
9
10
HALLELUJAH
90
36
27
1+0
-
9+0
3+6
2+7
1
HALLELUJAH
9
9
9

 

 

THE ROOTS OF COINCIDENCE

Arthur Koestler 1972

 Page 88 

"Euclidian geometries, invented by earlier mathematicians more or less as a game, provided the basis for his relativistic cosmology

Another great physicist whose thoughts moved in a similar direction was Wolfgang Pauli.

At the end of the 1932 conference on nuclear physics in Copenhagen the participants, as was their custom on these occasions, performed a skit full of that quantum humour of which we have already had a few samples. In that particular year they produced a parody of Goethe's Faust, in which Wolfgang Pauli was cast in the role of Mephistopheles; his Gretchen was the neutrino, whose existence Pauli had predicted, but which had not yet been discovered.

 

MEPHISTOPHELES

(to Faust):

 Beware, beware, of Reason and of Science

Man's highest powers, unholy in alliance.

You'll let yourself, through dazzling witchcraft yield

To weird temptations of the quantum field.

Enter Gretchen; she sings to Faust. Melody: "Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel" by Schubert.

GRETCHEN: 

My rest-mass is zero

My charge is the same

You are my hero

Neutrino's my name."

 

 

DOCTOR FAUSTUS

Thomas Mann 1933

 

 

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

Mikhail Bulgakov

1977 Edition

Page 352

"Don Quixote or a Faust, or , devil take me, a dead Souls! Eh?"

Page 360

'You and I speak different languages as usual,'

"Spirit of evil"

Page 399

"He became pope in 999 under the name of Sylvester II"

 

 

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

Mikhail Bulgakov

1977 Edition

BOOK ONE

'who are you, then?'

'I am part of that power which eternally will evil and eternally works good.'

GOETHE

 

 

BALANCING ALWAYS IS IS ALWAYS BALANCING

 

 

ONE TWO THREE FOUR 5 SIX SEVEN EIGHT NINE

NINE EIGHT SEVEN SIX 5 FOUR THREE TWE ONE

 

 

ALWAYS BALANCING IS IS BALANCING ALWAYS

 

 

GO DO GOOD GOD AND GODDESS ISISIS GODDESS AND GOD GOOD DO GO

GODDESS AND GOD GO DO GOOD ISISIS GOOD DO GO GOD AND GODDESS

 

 

PERFECT CREATIVITY DIVINE THOUGHT GODS THOUGHT DIVINE CREATIVITY PERFECT

 

 

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

Mikhail Bulgakov

1977 Edition

THE EXTRACTION OF THE MASTER

CHAPTER 24

Page 276

"the cat"

"the cat"

"The cat"

Page 277

"the cat"

"the cat"

"the cat"

"the cat"

"the cat"

"the cat"

"History will judge"

 

 

THE NINE LIVES OF A CAT OF NINE LIVES

 

 

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

Mikhail Bulgakov

1977 Edition

koroviev's stunts

CHAPTER 9

Page 99

"no. 50"

"five"

"five"

"five"

"five"

Page 250

'For someone well aquainted with the fifth dimension,"

"fifth dimension,"

"fifth dimension,"

"You must agree that that makes five""

Page 251

"five"

"fifth dimension,"

"fifth dimension,"

"to business, to business,"

 

 

THE MASTER AND MARGARITA

Mikhail Bulgakov

1977 Edition

BOOK ONE

'who are you, then?'

'I am part of that power which eternally will evil and eternally works good.'

GOETHE

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
W
=
5
-
3
WHO
46
19
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
Y
=
7
-
3
YOU
61
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
T
=
2
-
4
THEN
47
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
-
13
First Total
178
70
16
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
1+5
-
1+3
Add to Reduce
1+7+8
7+0
1+6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
4
Second Total
16
7
7
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+3
Reduce to Deduce
1+6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
4
Essence of Number
7
7
7
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

 

“Who are you then?"
"I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good.”
― Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
2
AM
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
4
PART
55
19
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
2
OF
21
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
5
POWER
77
32
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
5
WHICH
51
33
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
9
ETERNALLY
112
40
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
5
WILLS
75
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
4
EVIL
48
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
9
ETERNALLY
112
40
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
4
WORK
67
22
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
4
GOOD
41
23
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
70
-
61
First Total
750
300
57
-
2
2
9
16
15
6
7
8
9
-
-
7+0
-
6+1
Add to Reduce
7+5+0
3+0+0
5+7
-
-
-
-
1+6
1+5
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
7
Second Total
12
3
12
-
2
2
9
7
6
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+2
-
1+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
7
Essence of Number
3
3
3
-
2
2
9
7
6
6
7
8
9

 

 

BHAGAVAD GITA

chapter 11, verses 31-33

“Tell me who you are?”

I am as come as time, the waster of the peoples ready for the hour that ripens to their ruin.”

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
T
=
2
-
4
TELL
49
13
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
2
ME
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
W
=
5
-
3
WHO
46
19
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Y
=
7
-
3
YOU
61
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
19
-
15
First Total
198
72
27
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
1+9
-
1+5
Add to Reduce
1+9+8
7+2
2+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
10
-
6
Second Total
18
9
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
1+0
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
6
Essence of Number
9
9
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
A
=
1
-
2
AM
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
C
=
3
-
4
COME
36
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
A
=
1
-
2
AS
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
4
TIME
47
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
16
-
13
First Total
126
54
27
-
1
4
3
4
5
6
7
8
18
-
-
1+6
-
1+3
Add to Reduce
1+2+6
5+4
2+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+8
-
-
7
-
4
Second Total
9
9
9
-
1
4
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
4
Essence of Number
9
9
9
-
2
4
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
6
WASTER
86
23
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
7
PEOPLES
88
34
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
22
-
21
First Total
261
99
27
-
1
2
3
4
5
12
7
8
9
-
-
2+2
-
2+1
Add to Reduce
2+6+1
9+9
2+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+2
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
3
Second Total
9
18
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
3
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
1+8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
3
Essence of Number
9
9
9
-
-
1
3
4
5
3
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
R
=
9
-
4
READY
53
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
F
=
6
-
6
FOR
39
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
H
=
8
-
2
HOUR
62
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
-
3
THAT
49
13
4
-
-
-
4
4
-
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
-
3
RIPENS
81
36
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
5
TO
35
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
-
4
THEIR
60
33
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
R
=
9
-
6
RUIN
62
26
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