Previous Page
  Next Page
 
Evokation
 
 
Index
 

 

 

 

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
-
5
ADDED
18
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
M
=
4
-
5
MINUS
76
22
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
-
4
NONE
48
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
6
SHARED
55
28
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
2
BY
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
E
=
5
-
10
EVERYTHING
133
61
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
M
=
4
-
9
MULTIPLED
121
49
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
9
ABUNDANCE
65
29
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
35
-
57
First Total
995
266
59
-
1
2
3
8
5
6
14
8
18
-
-
3+5
-
5+7
Add to Reduce
9+9+5
2+6+6
5+9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
1+8
-
-
8
-
12
Second Total
23
14
10
-
1
2
3
8
5
6
5
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+2
Reduce to Deduce
2+3
1+4
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
3
Essence of Number
5
5
5
-
1
2
3
8
5
6
5
8
9

 

 

26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
-
7
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
14
15
-
-
-
19
-
-
-
-
24
-
26
+
=
115
1+1+5
=
7
-
7
-
7
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
7
8
9
-
2
3
4
5
-
7
-
+
=
83
8+3
=
11
1+1
2
-
2
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
10
11
12
13
-
-
16
17
18
-
20
21
22
23
-
25
-
+
=
236
2+3+6
=
11
1+1
2
-
2
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
+
=
351
3+5+1
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
+
=
126
1+2+6
=
9
-
9
-
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
1
occurs
x
3
=
3
-
3
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
2
occurs
x
3
=
6
-
6
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
3
occurs
x
3
=
9
-
9
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
+
=
4
occurs
x
3
=
12
1+2
3
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
+
=
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
+
=
6
occurs
x
3
=
18
1+8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
+
=
7
occurs
x
3
=
21
2+1
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
+
=
8
occurs
x
3
=
24
2+4
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
45
-
-
26
-
126
-
54
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4+5
-
-
2+6
-
1+2+6
-
5+4
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9

 

 

8
INFINITY
106
52
7
3
THE
33
15
6
8
INFINITE
86
50
5

 

 

-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
5
-
9
5
9
-
-
+
=
37
3+7
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
-
9
14
-
9
14
9
-
-
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
2
5
+
=
13
1+3
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
20
5
+
=
31
3+1
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
14
6
9
14
9
20
5
+
=
86
8+6
=
14
1+4
5
=
5
-
-
9
5
6
9
5
9
2
5
+
=
50
5+0
=
5
=
5
=
5
-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
ONE
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
7
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
9
-
9
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
3
=
27
2+7
9
23
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
22
-
-
8
-
50
-
23
2+3
-
9
-
-
9
-
9
-
-
-
-
2+2
-
-
-
-
5+0
-
2+3
5
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
4
-
-
8
-
5
-
5
-
-
9
5
6
9
5
9
2
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
4
-
-
8
-
5
-
5

 

 

-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
5
-
9
5
9
-
-
+
=
37
3+7
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
-
9
14
-
9
14
9
-
-
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
2
5
+
=
13
1+3
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
20
5
+
=
31
3+1
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
14
6
9
14
9
20
5
+
=
86
8+6
=
14
1+4
5
=
5
-
-
9
5
6
9
5
9
2
5
+
=
50
5+0
=
5
=
5
=
5
-
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
5
-
-
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
-
-
9
-
-
9
-
9
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
3
=
27
2+7
9
23
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
22
-
-
8
-
50
-
23
2+3
-
9
-
-
9
-
9
-
-
-
-
2+2
-
-
-
-
5+0
-
2+3
5
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
4
-
-
8
-
5
-
5
-
-
9
5
6
9
5
9
2
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
8
I
N
F
I
N
I
T
E
-
-
4
-
-
8
-
5
-
5

 

 

THE LIGHT IS RISING NOW RISING IS THE LIGHT

 

....

 

THE BULL OF MINOS

Leonard Cottrell 1953

Chapter VII

Page 90

THE QUEST CONTINUES

"OUT IN THE DARK BLUE SEA THERE LIES A LAND CALLED CRETE, A RICH AND LOVELY LAND,

WASHED BY THE WAVES ON EVERY SIDE, DENSELY PEOPLED AND BOASTING NINETY CITIES. . . 

ONE OF THE NINETY TOWNS IS A GREAT CITY CALLED KNOSSOS, AND THERE FOR NINE YEARS,

KING MINOS RULED AND ENJOYED THE FRIENDSHIP OF ALMIGHTY ZEUS

SUN 9 9 SUN

EARTH 7 7 EARTH

MOON 3 3 MOON

JUPITER 99 99 JUPITER

 

 

I = 9 9 = I
ME = 9 9 = ME
BRAIN + BODY = 9 9 = BODY + BRAIN
LIGHT + DARK = 9 9 = DARK + LIGHT
ENERGY + MASS = 9 9 = MASS + ENERGY
MIND + MATTER = 9 9 = MATTER + MIND
MAGNETIC + FIELD = 9 9 = FIELD + MAGNETIC
POSITIVE + NEGATIVE = 9 9 = NEGATIVE + POSITIVE
973 OM AZAZAZAZAZAZAZAZAZZAZAZAZAZAZAZAZAZAOM 973

 

 

The Prophet

Kahil Gibran 1923

Page 85

" Forget not that I shall come back to you

A

little while, and my longing shall gather dust and foam for another body

A

little while, a moment of rest upon the wind,
and another woman shall bear me"

 

 

THE ELEMENTS OF THE GODDESS

Caitlin Mathews 1997

WE ARE ENTERING THE TIME OF THE NINE-POINTED STAR

THE STAR OF MAKING REAL UPON EARTH THE GOLDEN DREAM OF PEACE THAT LIVES WITHIN US

BROOKE MEDICINE EAGLE

Page 72

"THE WAY OF THE DELIVERER IS THAT OF BONDAGE-BREAKER WHATEVER IS TRAPPED DENIED FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT THE DELIVERER PERSONALLY SETS FREE HER METHOD OF LIBERATION IS TO GO TO THE ROOTS OF THE BLOCKAGE AND LITERALLY BLAST IT FREE IN THIS THE DELIVERER BEARS A STRONG RESEMBLANCE TO THE SHAPER OF ALL WHO IS WILLING TO BE BROKEN INTO PIECES

THE SYMBOLIC IMAGE OF THIS TRANSFORMATION IS THAT OF THE BUTTERFLY EMERGING FROM THE CHRYSALIS FROM APPARENT DEATH AND DESTRUCTION ARISES A NEW FORM OF LIFE SO ARE WE BORNE OF THE DELIVERER RESHAPED AND TRANSFORMED TO LIVE MORE EFFECTIVELY WITHIN OUR CHOSEN FIELD OF OPERATION

Page 38

THIS ENNEAD OF ASPECTS IS ENDLESSLY ADAPTABLE FOR IT IS MADE UP OF NINE THE MOST AJUSTABLE AND YET ESSENTIALLY UNCHANGING NUMBER HOWEVER ONE CHOOSES TO ADD UP MULTIPLES OF NINE FOR EXAMPLE 54 72 108 THEY ALWAYS ADD UP TO NINE"

 

"HOWEVER ONE CHOOSES TO ADD UP MULTIPLES OF NINE FOR EXAMPLE

54 72 108

THEY ALWAYS ADD UP TO NINE"

 

 

TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT

January 17, 2008

Chrysalis

Muriel Spark: introduced by Mick Imlah.

Muriel Spark (1918–2004) was one of the most admired and successful novelists in English in the second half of the twentieth century, author of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1961), based on her own experience of school in Edinburgh, The Girls of Slender Means (1963) and others. But it was in poetry that she first made her name. From 1947–49 she was editor of the journal Poetry Review and her collection The Fanfarlo (1952) preceded her first published fiction. One of the poems in that book, "Chrysalis" was published in the TLS in June 1951

Chrysalis

We found it on a bunch of grapes and put it
In cotton wool, in a matchbox partly open,
In a room in London in wintertime, and in
A safe place, and then forgot it.

Early in the cold spring we said "See this!
Where on earth did the butterfly come from?"
It looked so unnatural whisking about the curtain:
Then we remembered the chrysalis.

There was the broken shell with what was once
The head askew; and what was once the worm
Was away out of the window, out of the warm,
Out of the scene of the small violence.

Not strange, that the pretty creature formalized
The virtue of its dark unconscious wait
For pincers of light to come and pick it out.
But it was a bad business, our being surprised.

Muriel Spark (1951)

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Thursday, April 6, 2006

Jonathan Cainer

GEMINI

May 22 -June 22

CATERPILLARS, when they form cocoons, do not succumb to any sudden doubts.They do not wonder why it is necessary to lock themselves away for a while. They do not consider that it might be unhealthy to retreat so far: Nor, when they finally emerge as blazing, beautiful butterflies, do they stop to-wonder whether life might have been better back in the-old days without wings. You are going through a profound transformation. Absolutely nothing is wrong with this."

 

 

MEDITATIONS FOR EVERY DAY

Father Andrew 1934

MONDAY IN EASTER WEEK

RISEN INDEED

'The Lord is risen indeed.'-S. LUKE xxiv. 34­

Page 136

SAINT JOHN tells us in his Gospel that, when he and Peter went speeding down to the sepulchre of our Lord and entered in, he ' saw and believed.' What was it that brought conviction to John? He saw something in the way the grave-clothes were disposed which brought absolute conviction to him of our Lord's Resurrection. If he had just seen the grave­clothes put on one side, surely he would have thought, as the women thought, that the body of our Lord had been taken from the tomb, but there was something about them which he says brought conviction to him.
The Jewish method of burial was to wind linen round and round the body, sprinkling myrrh and spices upon the linen as they did so. The myrrh was sticky and made the bands of linen adhere closely together, so that the body was like a mummy or the chrysalis of a caterpillar. What S. John saw, when he entered the tomb, was that the linen which had been wound round the body still kept its shape, but it was clear that the body was not inside it. The linen lay there like an empty shell or a chrysalis from which the moth has risen. The napkin which had been laid over the face of Jesus had fallen back and lay in its own place by itself. He saw that, and it brought conviction to him, and he went away with a wholly different frame of mind from that with which he came. As Bishop Westcott says so well in his commentary, the feeling of the apostles is better expressed by their words, The Master lives,' than by the words, He is risen.' They realized that our Lord had never been defeated by death.

 

 

MAN'S UNKNOWN JOURNEY

Staveley Bulford 1941

An introduction and contribution to the study of subjects essential to a new revelation - The Evolution of the Mind and Consciousness - in the journey of Mankind towards Perfection on and beyond the Earth

Page 190/191

"Words are inadequate to express the multitude of patterns of both Harmony and Discord portrayed by Thought, and the reader who may be unfamiliar with such a possibility as Thought power, must feel somewhat like a cocoon being told that some day he will be a butterfly himself and fly around from / flower to to flower that even at the present moment he, the cocoon, possesses all the essentials for that almost inconceivable manifestation."

 

 

Encyclopedia Of Ancient And Forbidden Knowledge

Zolar 1988 Edition

Page 39

KABBALISTIC WISDOM

There is no death; there is no destruction. All is but change and transformation-first the caterpillar, then the chrysalis, then the mighty mind, and at last a noble Soul."

 

 

THE DEATH OF FOREVER

A NEW FUTURE FOR HUMAN CONSCIOUSNESS

1991

Page 266

"We should create new rites of passage to celebrate the phases of the human life cycle, rituals for birth, for the transit into adolescence, and above all, for dying.
Of these, the need for a ritual of dying is the most urgent. I know of no greater testament to the failure of our civilisation than the fact that so many people die alone, abandoned like discards on society's junk heap. Dying must again be united with a sense of the sacred, for it is here, if anywhere, that the psyche outgrows its human limitation. The most important message of this book is that consciousness cannot be extinguished by death, for consciousness transcends time. We should learn to approach death with gratitude, seeing it for what it is, the final elimination of ego, the end of the fallacies of time and self.
In the end it can all be said so simply.
Time and self are outgrown husks which consciousness will one day discard, just as a butterfly abandons its chrysalis to fly towards the sun.

 

IN THE END IT CAN ALL BE SAID SO SIMPLY TIME AND SELF

ARE OUTGROWN HUSKS WHICH CONSCIOUSNESS WILL ONE DAY DISCARD

JUST AS A BUTTERFLY ABANDONS ITS CHRYSALIS TO FLY TOWARDS THE SUN

 

 

THE LION PATH

YOU CAN TAKE IT WITH YOU

A Manual of the Short Path to Regeneration for our times

by

Musaios

Page 33

It is time to examine the regenerative process - the way out of our limited state of body and awareness - a state that was thought of in this doctrine as "larval" to that which would ensue, just as the effectively one - dimensional or linear caterpillar has the hidden ability to spin a self - made cocoon - tomb and then turn into a pupal case, with future wings already outlined on it - a stage that can again metamorphose into the winged imago or mature form that emerges from the shell of the tomb - egg of the cocoon and flies aloft into the sky.

 

 

THE LION PATH

YOU CAN TAKE IT WITH YOU

A Manual of the Short Path to Regeneration for our times

by

Musaios

Page 137

"A winged and wondrous child

will whirl a whole world into being . . .

That child alone shall fly the abyss

and reach the Second Sun. . . ."

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
6
WINGED
62
35
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
8
WONDROUS
129
39
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
C
=
3
-
5
CHILD
36
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
15
-
23
-
247
112
22
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
4
WILL
56
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
5
WHIRL
70
34
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
5
WHOLE
63
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
W
=
5
-
5
WORLD
72
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
I
=
9
-
4
INTO
58
22
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
5
BEING
37
28
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
32
-
29
-
357
159
33
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
C
=
3
-
5
CHILD
36
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
A
=
1
-
5
ALONE
47
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
5
SHALL
52
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
F
=
6
-
3
FLY
43
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
5
ABYSS
66
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
16
-
30
-
326
119
38
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
-
5
REACH
35
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
6
SECOND
60
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
3
SUN
54
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
14
-
20
-
201
84
30
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
77
-
102
First Total
1131
474
123
-
5
4
6
8
5
18
21
16
36
-
-
7+7
-
1+0+2
Add to Reduce
1+7+1
4+7+4
1+2+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+8
2+1
1+6
3+6
-
-
14
-
3
Second Total
6
15
6
-
5
4
6
8
5
9
3
7
9
-
-
1+4
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
1+5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
3
Essence of Number
6
6
6
-
5
4
6
8
5
9
3
7
9

 

 

I
=
9
-
-
IMAGO
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
I
=
9
Q
5
IMAGO
45
27
27
-
-
-
-
-
-
4+5
2+7
2+7
I
=
9
Q
5
IMAGO
9
9
9

 

 

-`
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
6
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
-
-
9
-
-
-
15
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
-`
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
1
7
-
+
=
12
1+2
=
3
=
3
-
-
-
13
1
7
-
+
=
21
2+1
=
3
=
3
-`
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
13
1
7
15
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
=
9
-
-
9
4
1
7
6
+
=
27
2+7
=
9
=
9
-
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
TWO
2
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
18
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
27
-
-
5
-
27
1+8
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+7
-
-
-
-
2+7
9
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
9
-
-
5
-
9
-
-
9
4
1
7
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
9
-
-
5
-
9

 

 

5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
6
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
-
9
-
-
-
15
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
1
7
-
+
=
12
1+2
=
3
=
3
-
-
13
1
7
-
+
=
21
2+1
=
3
=
3
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
13
1
7
15
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
=
9
-
9
4
1
7
6
+
=
27
2+7
=
9
=
9
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
27
-
-
5
-
27
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+7
-
-
-
-
2+7
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
9
-
-
5
-
9
-
9
4
1
7
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
I
M
A
G
O
-
-
9
-
-
5
-
9

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Thursday, February 7,2008

By Laura Clark

Education Correspondent

"I think therefore I'm five"

PHILOSOPHY CLASSES FOR YOUNGSTERS

 

 

UNIVERSITY AACHEN

Weathering damage on Pharaonic Sandstone


First Pylon, WNW-facade, part 2. 9. Karnak Temple, Temple of Ptah, .... developed for the sandstone monuments in Upper Egypt, twenty-three investigation ... www.stone.rwth-aachen.

 

 

Wbn RaMPt's Vocabulary to English

Thebes (capital of Upper Egypt) webat (wbA.t, fem.) - Courtyard (AS room) wenem (wnm, verb) - eat wenwet (wnw.t, fem.) - hour wepwet (wpw.t, fem.) - message ... www.donf.com/egypt/medu/vocab2.htm

wenem (wnm, verb) - eat
wenwet (wnw.t, fem.) - hour
wepwet (wpw.t, fem.) - message

 

WENEM 5 5 5 5 5 WENEM

WENWET 555552 WENWET

WEPWET 557552 WEPWET

 

 

SIGNS IN THE SKY

OPENING THE STARGATE

Adrian Gilbert 2000

Chapter 8

Page 151

"Originally, according to an Old Kingdom creation myth, Re was a seperate god entirely who sprang from a cosmic egg laid by a celestial goose on the primeval mound at Wnw or Hermopolis Magna."

WNW 555 WNW

 

W
=
5
-
-
WNW
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
W
23
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
W
23
5
5
W
=
5
Q
3
WNW
60
15
15
-
-
-
-
-
-
6+0
1+5
1+5
W
=
5
Q
3
WNW
6
6
6

 

 

M
=
4
-
4
MIND
40
22
4
S
=
1
-
6
SPIRIT
91
37
1
M
=
4
-
6
MATTER
77
23
5
-
-
9
4
16
First Total
208
82
10
-
-
-
-
1+6
Add to Reduce
2+0+8
8+2
1+0
-
-
9
-
7
Second Total
10
10
1
-
-
-
4
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
-
-
-
9
5
7
Essence of Number
1
1
1

 

 

1
I
9
9
9
4
THAT
49
13
4
2
AM
14
14
5
7
Add to Reduce
72
36
18
-
Reduce to Deduce
7+2
3+6
1+8
7
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

1
I
9
9
9
2
AM
14
5
5
4
THAT
49
13
4
1
I
9
9
9
2
AM
14
5
5
10
First Total
95
41
32
1+0
Add to Reduce
9+5
4+1
3+2
1
Second Total
14
5
5
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+4
-
-
1
Essence of Number
5
5
5

 

 

S
=
1
6
SOURCE
81
36
9
O
=
6
2
OF
21
12
3
T
=
2
3
THE
33
15
6
R
=
9
5
RIVER
72
36
9
-
-
18
16
First Total
243
99
27
-
-
1+8
1+6
Add to Reduce
2+4+3
9+9
2+7
-
-
9
7
Second Total
9
18
9
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
1+8
-
-
-
9
7
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

4
SELF
42
15
6
-
CONSCIOUS
-
-
-
2
C+O
18
9
9
3
N+S+C
36
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
2
O+U
36
9
9
1
S
19
10
1
9
CONSCIOUS
118
46
37
-
-
1+1+8
4+6
3+7
9
CONSCIOUS
10
10
10
-
-
1+0
1+0
1+0
9
CONSCIOUS
1
1
1

 

 

-
CONSCIENCE
-
-
-
2
C+O
18
9
9
3
N+S+C
36
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
4
E+N+C+E
27
9
9
10
CONSCIENCE
90
36
36
1+0
-
9+0
3+6
3+6
1
CONSCIENCE
9
9
9

 

 

DOES GOD PLAY DICE

 

D
=
4
-
4
DOES
43
16
7
G
=
7
-
3
GOD
26
17
8
P
=
7
-
4
PLAY
54
18
9
D
=
4
-
4
DICE
39
21
3
-
-
22
-
15
Add to Reduce
162
72
27
-
-
2+2
-
1+5
Reduce to Deduce
1+6+2
7+2
2+7
-
-
4
-
6
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 



Does God play Dic
e? - Stephen Hawking

www.hawking.org.uk/does-god-play-dice.html‎


Does God Play Dice: The New Mathematics of Chaos (1989) is a book about chaos theory written by mathematician Ian Stewart. In this book Stewart explains ...

Mathematician Ian Stewart--who is also a very talented writer--shares his insights into the history and nature of the highly complex in Does God Play Dice: The ...

Bohr v Einstein - Does God play dice? - BBC
www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/...v...does-god-play-dice/14353.html‎


Book Review: Does God Play Dice - American Mathematical Society
www.ams.org/notices/200211/rev-holmes.pdf‎
by P Holmes - ‎2002 - ‎Related articles
Book Review. Does God Play Dice: The New. Mathematics of Chaos and. What Shape Is a Snowflake? Magical Numbers in Nature. Reviewed by Philip Holmes.

 

 

GREAT PHILOSOPHIES OF THE EAST

E. W. F. Tomlin 1952

Page 159

"Like the conpilers of the Old Testament: the editors of the Rig-Veda anthology were,careful to preserve intact material beloning to different epochs, We are thus able to trace the development of the early Aryan, religious consciousness , just as a reading of early and later parts of the Bible affords us an enlarged conception of the nature of the Hebrew Yahve. There is wisdom in this refusal on the part of priestly guardians to suppress the primitive elements of their faith; for these are better kept well before the eye than allowed to fester, as the result of exision, in that uneasy corner to be found in the most devout conscience. Some of the vedic hymns are merely satirical, such as that addressed 'To Frogs', which is considered to be a satire on the priesthood; or straightforward vers de societe- such as that on the 'The Gambler', of whose ('dice dearer than soma') it is said:

Downward they roll, and then spring quickly upward, and handless, force

The man with hands to serve them.

Cast on the board, like lumps of magic charcoal, though cold themselves, they burn

The heart to ashes."

 

 

CHANCE, SKILL, AND LUCK

The psychology of guessing and gambling

John Cohen 1960

Page57

"The propounding of a riddle to an an opponent served a purpose similar to that of divination, for it provided him with an opportunity to demonstrate that the gods supported- him. The questioner held him bound until he found the solution, and once he had found it he was free. The riddle thus had a sacred significance. 10,11 Divination by lot or riddle was never merely a resort to meaningless chance. It was an appeal directed to supernatural powers, as when the Greek heroes cast lots to decide who would fight with Hector.12 Since it is impossible to predict the fall of a die or the result of casting lots the outcome must presumably be decided by divine intervention. The professional diviners in the market-places of China foretold the future by means of the samse lots with which the people gambled. To this day playing cards are used for telling fortunes as well as for gambling, on the assumption that a supernatural force influences the shuffling of the cards and hence governs the result. Divination embodies the idea that the gods themselves govern the universe by gambling. The Ases of Scandinavian myths, like the Hindu Siva, god of a thousand names', determined the fate of mankind by throw-/Page 58/ing dice. So, two, in Homer's Illiad (Bookxv), Poseidon, Zeus and Hades divide the world between them by shaking lots, which by their special power could reveal the will of the gods.13 In the myth of Osiris, Rhea (Nut= the heaven) had five children born on the the five 'epagomenal' days of the year, after the 360th day. Hermes (Thoth) had won those days during a game of draughts with Selene (the moon).

 

 

DOES GOD PLAY DICE

THE NEW MATHEMATICS OF CHAOS

Ian Stewart 1989

Page 1

PROLOGUE

CLOCKWORK OR CHAOS?

"YOU BELIEVE IN A GOD WHO PLAYS DICE, AND I IN COMPLETE LAW AND ORDER."

Albert Einstein, Letter to Max Born

 

 

The Death Of Forever

A New Future for Human Consciousness

Darryl Reanney (1995 Edition)

Page 219

(It was this indeterminate character of quantum mechanics that caused Einstein to complain that God 'did not play dice with the world'.)

 

 

TWO HANDS OF GOD

An Exploration of the Underlying Unity of all Things

Alan Watts 1963

The Cosmic Dance

Page 98

"In Puranic literature the Hindu gods, like those of the Greeks, disport themselves by descending to the human condition and allowing them selves to be carried away by human passions. This is perhaps a way of saying that at every level of /Page 98/ life- divine, human, or animal-the problem and predicament of life is the same; an eternal giving-in to the temptation of losing control of the situation, of trusting oneself to chance-the passion of the gambler. Hence the words of Krishna in the Bhagavad Gita " I am the gambling of the cheat."

 

 

DAILY MIRROR

Tuesday November 25, 2008

Front Page

By Bob Roberts, Political Editor

"THE GAMBLER"

"...ACES HIGH..."

"...holding winning hand..."

"...gamble..."

Page 4

"...gamble..."

"...gamble..."

Page 5

"...gamble..."

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Monday, November 24, 2008

Front Page

By Michael Lea Political Correspondent

"...GAMBLE ON YOUR FUTURE..."

"...gamble..."

Page 6

"...gamble..."

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Friday, August 10, 2007

By James Chapman Deputy Political Editor

Front Page

"...GAMBLING..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

Page 4

"Gambling our future"

"...Gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...Gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gambling..."

"...gamblers..."

"...gambling..."

Page 12/13

".Lucan I should be so lucky"

By Brian Masters

Page 13

"What ingrediants are needed to ensure these stories endure? The tales must involve somebody famous, somebody rich, somebody notorious, somebody dead, or somebody about whom mystery can be endlessly invoked. If you can manage all these then you have a winner"

"...gambled..."

 

 

PLAY UP PLAY UP AND PLAY THE GAME

 

ODDS AND EVENS

 

HEADS I WIN TAILS YOU LOSE

 

 

AGAINST THE GODS

THE REMARKABLE STORY OF RISK

Peter L. Bernstein

Page 11

The Winds of the Greeks and the Role of the Dice

"Human beings have always been infatuated with gambling because it puts us head to head against the fates, with no holds barred. We enter this daunting battle because we are convinced that we have a powerful ally: Lady Luck will interpose herself between us and the fates / Page 12 /(or the odds) to bring victory to our side."

Page 50

"On the cast of one die"

 

 

GOD

Alexander Waugh

Page 162

Einstein's blunder. - When Einstein tried to refute quantum physics with his now famous dictum 'God does not play dice' He revealed his ignorance of scripture, for God does indeed play dice in the form of a game called urim and thummim. These flat stone dice are mentioned many times in the Hebrew Bible.

 

 

A
=
1
-
6
ALBERT
58
22
4
E
=
5
-
8
EINSTEIN
95
41
5
-
-
6
-
14
Add to Reduce
153
63
9
-
-
2+2
-
1+4
Reduce to Deduce
1+5+3
6+3
-
-
-
6
-
5
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 


Albert Einstein - Wikiquote

en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Albert_Einstein‎

I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice. .... and the Poet, Einstein said: "As I have said so many times, God doesn't play dice with the world."
Albert Einstein

A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving...
Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a theoretical physicist and humanist who is widely regarded as one of the most influential scientists of all time. He is most famous for his Special and General Theories of Relativity, but contributed in other areas of physics. He won the Nobel Prize in physics for his explanation of the photoelectric effect.

A new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move toward higher levels. From "Atomic Education Urged by Einstein", New York Times (25 May 1946), and later quoted in the article "The Real Problem is in the Hearts of Man" by Michael Amrine, from the New York Times Magazine (23 June 1946). A slightly modified version of the 23 June article was reprinted in Einstein on Peace by Otto Nathan and Heinz Norden (1960), and it was also reprinted in Einstein on Politics by David E. Rowe and Robert Schulmann (2007), p. 383.
In The New Quotable Einstein (2005), editor Alice Calaprice suggests that two quotes attributed to Einstein which she could not find sources for, "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them" and "The world we have created today as a result of our thinking thus far has problems which cannot be solved by thinking the way we thought when we created them," may both be paraphrases of the 1946 quote above. A similar unsourced variant is "The world we have created is a product of our thinking; it cannot be changed without changing our thinking."
In the 23 June article Einstein expanded somewhat on the original quote from the 25 May article: Many persons have inquired concerning a recent message of mine that "a new type of thinking is essential if mankind is to survive and move to higher levels."Often in evolutionary processes a species must adapt to new conditions in order to survive. Today the atomic bomb has altered profoundly the nature of the world as we knew it, and the human race consequently finds itself in a new habitat to which it must adapt its thinking.In the light of new knowledge, a world authority and an eventual world state are not just desirable in the name of brotherhood, they are necessary for survival. In previous ages a nation's life and culture could be protected to some extent by the growth of armies in national competition. Today we must abandon competition and secure cooperation. This must be the central fact in all our considerations of international affairs; otherwise we face certain disaster. Past thinking and methods did not prevent world wars. Future thinking must prevent wars.

Letter of 1950, as quoted in The New York Times (29 March 1972) and The New York Post (28 November 1972). However, The New Quotable Einstein by Alice Calaprice (Princeton University Press, 2005: ISBN 0691120749), p. 206, has a different and presumably more accurate version of this letter, which she dates to February 12, 1950 and describes as "a letter to a distraught father who had lost his young son and had asked Einstein for some comforting words":

A human being is a part of the whole, called by us "Universe," a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest—a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. The striving to free oneself from this delusion is the one issue of true religion. Not to nourish it but to try to overcome it is the way to reach the attainable measure of peace of mind.

I am enough of an artist to draw freely upon my imagination. Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world.

 

 

Quote by Albert Einstein: God does not play dice with the universe.

www.goodreads.com/.../2669-god-does-not-play-dice-with-the-universe‎

“God does not play dice with the universe.”

― Albert Einstein, The Born-Einstein Letters 1916-55

 

 

5
URIMM
61
25
7
7
THUMMIM
97
34
7

 

GOD

Alexander Waugh 2002

Page 162

Einstein's blunder. - When Einstein tried to refute quantum physics with his now famous dictum 'God does not play dice' He revealed his ignorance of scripture, for God does indeed play dice in the form of a game called urim and thummim. These flat stone dice are mentioned many times in the Hebrew Bible. Although urim and thummim actually belonged to God (Ps.-Philo 47:2) they were jealously guarded by the high priest either in his ephod (an oracular pouch) or in a pocket by his chest. The exact manner in which urim and thummim was played has been lost to the mysteries of time, but it is thought they provided the same function as a coin when it is flipped for heads or tails.

 

G
=
7
-
4
GODS
45
18
9
O
=
7
-
2
OF
21
12
3
T
=
7
-
3
THE
33
15
6
F
=
4
-
9
FIRMAMENT
99
45
9
-
-
25
-
18
First Total
198
90
27
-
-
2+5
-
1+8
Add to Reduce
1+9+8
9+0
2+7
-
-
6
-
9
Second Total
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
-
-
6
-
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
S
=
1
-
8
STRAIGHT
102
39
3
L
=
3
-
4
LINE
40
22
4
E
=
5
-
4
EVEN
46
19
1
-
-
9
-
17
First Total
189
81
9
-
-
-
-
1+7
Add to Reduce
1+8+9
8+1
-
-
-
9
-
8
Second Total
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
-
-
9
-
8
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
S
=
1
-
8
STRAIGHT
102
39
3
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
N
=
5
-
6
NARROW
89
35
8
-
-
9
-
20
First Total
243
99
18
-
-
-
-
2+0
Add to Reduce
2+4+3
9+9
1+8
-
-
9
-
2
Second Total
9
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
1+8
-
-
-
9
-
2
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
S
=
1
-
8
STRAIGHT
102
39
3
L
=
3
-
4
LINE
40
22
4
I
=
9
-
2
IS
28
10
1
-
-
9
-
17
First Total
171
72
9
-
-
-
-
1+7
Add to Reduce
1+8+9
7+2
-
-
-
9
-
8
Second Total
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
-
-
9
-
8
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
SIRIUS
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
1
S
19
10
1
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
R
=
9
-
1
R
18
9
9
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
U
=
3
-
1
U
21
3
3
S
=
1
-
1
S
19
10
1
-
-
32
-
6
SIRIUS
95
50
32
-
-
3+2
-
-
-
9+5
5+0
3+2
-
-
5
-
6
SIRIUS
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
-
-
-
5
-
6
SIRIUS
5
5
5

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
SOTHIS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
S+O
34
7
7
-
-
-
-
1
T+H+I+S
56
20
2
S
=
1
-
6
SOTHIS
90
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
9+0
2+7
-
S
=
1
-
6
SOTHIS
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
-
S
=
1
-
6
SOTHIS
5
9
9

 

Sothic cycle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sothic_cycle‎

The Sothic year is the length of time for the star Sirius/Sothis to visually return to the same position in relation to the sun. Star years measured in this way vary ...

Sirius, known in ancient Egypt as Sopdet (Greek: Σῶθις = Sothis), is recorded in the earliest astronomical records. During the era of the Middle Kingdom, ...

 

Sirius (star) -- Encyclopedia Britannica - Britannica.com

www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/546598/Sirius‎

Sirius was known as Sothis to the ancient Egyptians, who were aware that it made its first heliacal rising (i.e., rose just before sunrise) of the year at about the ...

 

Sirius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sirius‎

Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky. With a visual apparent magnitude of −1.46, it is almost twice as bright as Canopus, the next brightest star. The name ...
‎Sirius (disambiguation) - ‎Canis Major - ‎Sirius Satellite Radio - ‎The Sirius Mystery
Sirius

 

Sirius is the brightest star in the night sky. With a visual apparent magnitude of −1.46, it is almost twice as bright as Canopus, the next brightest star. The name "Sirius" is derived from the Ancient Greek: Σείριος Seirios ("glowing" or "scorcher"). The star has the Bayer designation Alpha Canis Majoris (α CMa). What the naked eye perceives as a single star is actually a binary star system, consisting of a white main-sequence star of spectral type A1V, termed Sirius A, and a faint white dwarf companion of spectral type DA2, called Sirius B. The distance separating Sirius A from its companion varies between 8.1 and 31.5 AU.[18]

Sirius appears bright because of both its intrinsic luminosity and its proximity to Earth. At a distance of 2.6 parsecs (8.6 ly), as determined by the Hipparcos astrometry satellite,[5][19][20] the Sirius system is one of Earth's near neighbors; for Northern-hemisphere observers between 30 degrees and 73 degrees of latitude (including almost all of Europe and North America), it is the closest star (after the Sun) that can be seen with the naked eye. Sirius is gradually moving closer to the Solar System, so it will slightly increase in brightness over the next 60,000 years. After that time its distance will begin to recede, but it will continue to be the brightest star in the Earth's sky for the next 210,000 years.[21]

Sirius A is about twice as massive as the Sun and has an absolute visual magnitude of 1.42. It is 25 times more luminous than the Sun[7] but has a significantly lower luminosity than other bright stars such as Canopus or Rigel. The system is between 200 and 300 million years old.[7] It was originally composed of two bright bluish stars. The more massive of these, Sirius B, consumed its resources and became a red giant before shedding its outer layers and collapsing into its current state as a white dwarf around 120 million years ago.[7]

Sirius is also known colloquially as the "Dog Star", reflecting its prominence in its constellation, Canis Major (Greater Dog).[12] The heliacal rising of Sirius marked the flooding of the Nile in Ancient Egypt and the "dog days" of summer for the ancient Greeks, while to the Polynesians it marked winter and was an important star for navigation around the Pacific Ocean

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
D
=
4
-
3
DOG
26
17
8
S
=
1
-
4
STAR
58
13
4
-
-
7
-
10
Add to Reduce
117
45
18
-
-
-
-
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+7
4+5
1+8
-
-
7
-
1
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
G
=
7
-
3
GOD
26
17
8
S
=
1
-
4
STAR
58
13
4
-
-
10
-
10
Add to Reduce
117
45
18
-
-
1+0
-
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+7
4+5
1+8
-
-
1
-
1
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
S
=
1
-
4
STAR
58
13
4
G
=
7
-
3
GOD
26
17
8
-
-
10
-
10
Add to Reduce
117
45
18
-
-
1+0
-
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+7
4+5
1+8
-
-
1
-
1
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
HAVE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
H+A
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
V+E
27
9
9
H
=
8
Q
4
HAVE
36
18
18
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
COME
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
C+O
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
M+E
18
9
9
C
=
3
Q
4
COME
36
18
18
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
20
Q
9
First Total
81
45
45
-
-
2+0
-
-
Add to Reduce
8+1
4+5
4+5
-
-
2
Q
9
Second Total
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
-
-
-
-
2
Q
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

Maat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maat

Maat.svg

Maat was both the goddess and the personification of truth and justice. Her ostrich feather represents truth.

Goddess of truth and justice

Major cult center
All ancient Egyptian cities

Symbol
the ostrich feather

Consort
Thoth (in some accounts)

Parents
Ra

Maat or ma'at (thought to have been pronounced *[muʔ.ʕat]),[1] also spelled māt or mayet, was the ancient Egyptian concept of truth, balance, order, law, morality, and justice. Maat was also personified as a goddess regulating the stars, seasons, and the actions of both mortals and the deities, who set the order of the universe from chaos at the moment of creation. Her (ideological) counterpart was Isfet.

The earliest surviving records indicating Maat is the norm for nature and society, in this world and the next, were recorded during the Old Kingdom, the earliest substantial surviving examples being found in the Pyramid Texts of Unas (ca. 2375 BCE and 2345 BCE).[2]

Later, as a goddess in other traditions of the Egyptian pantheon, where most goddesses were paired with a male aspect, her masculine counterpart was Thoth and their attributes are the same. After the rise of Ra they were depicted together in the Solar Barque.

After her role in creation and continuously preventing the universe from returning to chaos, her primary role in Egyptian mythology dealt with the weighing of souls that took place in the underworld, Duat.[3] Her feather was the measure that determined whether the souls (considered to reside in the heart) of the departed would reach the paradise of afterlife successfully.

Pharaohs are often depicted with the emblems of Maat to emphasise their role in upholding the laws of the Creator.[4]

 

Maat wearing feather of truth
Maat as a principle was formed to meet the complex needs of the emergent Egyptian state that embraced diverse peoples with conflicting interests.[5] The development of such rules sought to avert chaos and it became the basis of Egyptian law. From an early period the King would describe himself as the "Lord of Maat" who decreed with his mouth the Maat he conceived in his heart.

The significance of Maat developed to the point that it embraced all aspects of existence, including the basic equilibrium of the universe, the relationship between constituent parts, the cycle of the seasons, heavenly movements, religious observations and fair dealings, honesty and truthfulness in social interactions.[6]

The ancient Egyptians had a deep conviction of an underlying holiness and unity within the universe. Cosmic harmony was achieved by correct public and ritual life. Any disturbance in cosmic harmony could have consequences for the individual as well as the state. An impious King could bring about famine or blasphemy blindness to an individual.[7] In opposition to the right order expressed in the concept of Maat is the concept of Isfet: chaos, lies and violence.[8]

In addition to the importance of the Maat, several other principles within ancient Egyptian law were essential, including an adherence to tradition as opposed to change, the importance of rhetorical skill, and the significance of achieving impartiality, and social justice. In one Middle Kingdom (2062 to c. 1664 BCE) text the Creator declares "I made every man like his fellow". Maat called the rich to help the less fortunate rather than exploit them, echoed in tomb declarations: "I have given bread to the hungry and clothed the naked" and "I was a husband to the widow and father to the orphan".[9]

To the Egyptian mind, Maat bound all things together in an indestructible unity: the universe, the natural world, the state, and the individual were all seen as parts of the wider order generated by Maat.

The underlying concepts of Taoism and Confucianism resemble Maat at times.[10] Many of these concepts were codified into laws, and many of the concepts often were discussed by ancient Egyptian philosophers and officials who referred to the spiritual text known as the Book of the Dead.

Maat and the law[edit source]

There is little surviving literature that describes the practice of ancient Egyptian law. Maat was the spirit in which justice was applied rather than the detailed legalistic exposition of rules (as found in Mosaic law of the 1st millennium BCE). Maat was the norm and basic values that formed the backdrop for the application of justice that had to be carried out in the spirit of truth and fairness. From the 5th dynasty (c. 2510-2370 BCE) onwards the Vizier responsible for justice was called the Priest of Maat and in later periods judges wore images of Maat.[11]

Later scholars and philosophers also would embody concepts from the wisdom literature, or Sebayt.[12] These spiritual texts dealt with common social or professional situations and how each was best to be resolved or addressed in the spirit of Maat. It was very practical advice, and highly case-based, so that few specific and general rules could be derived from them.

During the Greek period in Egyptian history, Greek law existed alongside Egyptian law. The Egyptian law preserved the rights of women who were allowed to act independently of men and own substantial personal property and in time this influenced the more restrictive conventions of the Greeks and Romans.[13] When the Romans took control of Egypt, the Roman legal system which existed throughout the Roman Empire was imposed in Egypt.

Maat and scribes[edit source]

Scribes held prestigious positions in ancient Egyptian society in view of their importance in the transmission of religious, political and commercial information.[14]

Thoth was the patron of scribes who is described as the one "who reveals Maat and reckons Maat; who loves Maat and gives Maat to the doer of Maat".[15] In texts such as the Instruction of Amenemope the scribe is urged to follow the precepts of Maat in his private life as well as his work.[16] The exhortations to live according to Maat are such that these kinds of instructional texts have been described as "Maat Literature".[17]

Maat as a goddess[edit source]

 

Goddess Maat[18][19]
in hieroglyphs

Maat was the goddess of harmony, justice, and truth represented as a young woman,[20] sitting or standing, holding a was scepter, the symbol of power, in one hand and an ankh, the symbol of eternal life, in the other. Sometimes she is depicted with wings on each arm or as a woman with an ostrich feather on her head.[21] Depictions of Maat as a goddess are recorded from as early as the middle of the Old Kingdom (c. 2680 to 2190 BCE).[22]

The sun-god Ra came from the primaeval mound of creation only after he set his daughter Maat in place of Isfet (chaos). Kings inherited the duty to ensure Maat remained in place and they with Ra are said to "live on Maat", with Akhenaten (r. 1372-1355 BCE) in particular emphasising the concept to a degree that, John D. Ray asserts, the kings contemporaries viewed as intolerance and fanaticism.[23] Some kings incorporated Maat into their names, being referred to as Lords of Maat,[24] or Meri-Maat (Beloved of Maat). When beliefs about Thoth arose in the Egyptian pantheon and started to consume the earlier beliefs at Hermopolis about the Ogdoad, it was said that she was the mother of the Ogdoad and Thoth the father.

In the Duat, the Egyptian underworld, the hearts of the dead were said to be weighed against her single "Feather of Ma'at", symbolically representing the concept of Maat, in the Hall of Two Truths. A heart which was unworthy was devoured by the goddess Ammit and its owner condemned to remain in the Duat. The heart was considered the location of the soul by ancient Egyptians. Those people with good and pure hearts were sent on to Aaru. Osiris came to be seen as the guardian of the gates of Aaru after he became part of the Egyptian pantheon and displaced Anubis in the Ogdoad tradition.

The weighing of the heart, pictured on papyrus in the Book of the Dead typically, or in tomb scenes, shows Anubis overseeing the weighing and the lioness Ammit seated awaiting the results so she could consume those who failed. The image would be the vertical heart on one flat surface of the balance scale and the vertical Shu-feather standing on the other balance scale surface. Other traditions hold that Anubis brought the soul before the posthumous Osiris who performed the weighing.

Temples of Maat[edit source]

The earliest evidence for a dedicated temple is in the New Kingdom (c. 1569 to 1081 BCE) era, despite the great importance placed on Maat. Amenhotep III commissioned a temple in the Karnak complex, whilst textual evidence indicates that other temples of Maat were located in Memphis and at Deir el-Medina.[25]

Maat themes found in the The Book of Going Forth by Day and on tomb inscriptions[edit source]

 

This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research may be removed. (November 2011)

A section of the Egyptian Book of the Dead written on papyrus showing the "Weighing of the Heart" in the Duat using the feather of Maat as the measure in balance
One aspect of ancient Egyptian funerary literature which often is mistaken for a codified ethic of Maat is Spell (Chapter) 125 of the Book of the Dead or Papyrus of Ani (known to the ancient Egyptians as The Book of Going Forth by Day). The lines of these texts are often collectively called the "Forty-Two Declarations of Purity". These declarations varied somewhat from tomb to tomb and so cannot be considered a canonical definition of Maat. Rather, they appear to express each tomb owner's individual practices in life to please Maat, as well as words of absolution from misdeeds or mistakes, made by the tomb owner in life could be declared as not having been done, and through the power of the written word, wipe particular misdeed from the afterlife record of the deceased.

Many of the lines are similar, however, and they can help to give the student a "flavor" for the sorts of things which Maat governed — essentially everything, from the most formal to the most mundane aspects of life.

The doctrine of Maat is represented in the declarations to Rekhti-merti-f-ent-Maat and the 42 Negative Confessions listed in the Papyrus of Ani. The following are taken from public domain translations made by E. A. Wallis Budge in the early part of the 20th century; more recent translations may differ in the light of modern scholarship.

 

I

THAT

AM AT MAAT AT AM

I

 

I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
A
=
1
-
2
AM
14
5
5
A
=
1
Q
2
AT
21
3
3
M
=
4
Q
4
MAAT
35
8
8
A
=
1
Q
2
AT
21
3
3
A
=
1
Q
2
AM
14
5
5
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
28
Q
18
First Total
172
55
46
-
-
2+8
-
1+8
Add to Reduce
1+7+2
5+5
4+6
-
-
10
Q
9
Second Total
10
10
10
-
-
1+0
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
1+0
-
-
1
Q
9
Essence of Number
1
1
1

 

 

I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
A
=
1
-
2
AM
14
5
5
A
=
1
Q
2
AT
21
3
3
M
=
4
Q
4
MAAT
35
8
8
A
=
1
Q
2
AM
14
5
5
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
17
Q
16
Add to Reduce
151
52
43
-
-
1+7
-
1+6
Reduce to Deduce
1+5+1
5+2
4+3
-
-
8
Q
7
Essence of Number
7
7
7

 

 

I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
HAVE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
H+A
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
V+E
27
9
9
H
=
8
Q
5
HAVE
36
18
18
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
17
Q
5
Add to Reduce
45
27
27
-
-
1+7
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
4+5
2+7
2+7
-
-
8
Q
5
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

42 Negative Confessions (Papyrus of Ani)[edit source]

1.I have not committed sin.
2.I have not committed robbery with violence.
3.I have not stolen.
4.I have not slain men and women.
5.I have not stolen grain.
6.I have not purloined offerings.
7.I have not stolen the property of the god.
8.I have not uttered lies.
9.I have not carried away food.
10.I have not uttered curses.
11.I have not committed adultery, I have not lain with men.
12.I have made none to weep.
13.I have not eaten the heart [i.e I have not grieved uselessly, or felt remorse].
14.I have not attacked any man.
15.I am not a man of deceit.
16.I have not stolen cultivated land.
17.I have not been an eavesdropper.
18.I have slandered [no man].
19.I have not been angry without just cause.
20.I have not debauched the wife of any man.
21.I have not debauched the wife of [any] man. (repeats the previous affirmation but addressed to a different god).
22.I have not polluted myself.
23.I have terrorised none.
24.I have not transgressed [the Law].
25.I have not been wroth.
26.I have not shut my ears to the words of truth.
27.I have not blasphemed.
28.I am not a man of violence.
29.I am not a stirrer up of strife (or a disturber of the peace).
30.I have not acted (or judged) with undue haste.
31.I have not pried into matters.
32.I have not multiplied my words in speaking.
33.I have wronged none, I have done no evil.
34.I have not worked witchcraft against the King (or blasphemed against the King).
35.I have never stopped [the flow of] water.
36.I have never raised my voice (spoken arrogantly, or in anger).
37.I have not cursed (or blasphemed) God.
38.I have not acted with evil rage.
39.I have not stolen the bread of the gods.
40.I have not carried away the khenfu cakes from the Spirits of the dead.
41.I have not snatched away the bread of the child, nor treated with contempt the god of my city.
42.I have not slain the cattle belonging to the god.[26]

Assessors of Maat[edit source]

"The Assessors of Maat" are the 42 deities listed in the Papyrus of Nebseni, to whom the deceased make the Negative Confession in the Papyrus of Ani.[27]

See also[edit source]
Seshat, goddess of writing and measure, and a wife of Thoth
Egyptian soul

Notes[edit source]

1.^ Information taken from phonetic symbols for Maat, and explanations on how to pronounce based upon modern reals, revealed in (Collier and Manley pp. 2–4, 154)
2.^ Siegfried Morenz (1973). Egyptian Religion: Siegried Morenz. p. 273. ISBN 978-0-8014-8029-4.
3.^ Budge. The Gods of the Egyptians Vol. 1 p. 418.
4.^ Henrietta McCall (1990-01). Mesopotamian myths. University of Texas Press. p. 46. ISBN 0-292-72076-9.
5.^ Norman Rufus Colin Cohn (1993). Cosmos, Caos and the World to Come: The Ancient Roots of Apocalyptic Faith. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-300-05598-6.
6.^ Norman Rufus Colin Cohn (1993). Cosmos, Caos and the World to Come: The Ancient Roots of Apocalyptic Faith. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-300-05598-6.
7.^ John Romer, "Testament", pp. 41-42, Guild Publishing, 1988.
8.^ "Religion and Cultural Memory: Ten Studies", Jan Assmann, Translated by Rodney Livingstone, p. 34, Stanford University Press, 2006, ISBN 080474523.
9.^ James P. Allen (2000). Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphs. p. 116. ISBN 978-0-521-77483-3.
10.^ Edwin Oliver James (1970). Creation and Cosmology: A Historical and Comparative Study. Brill Academic Pub. p. 50. ISBN 978-90-04-01617-0.
11.^ Siegfried Morenz (1973). Egyptian Religion: Siegried Morenz. pp. 117–125. ISBN 978-0-8014-8029-4.
12.^ See Russ VerSteeg, Law in Ancient Egypt 19 (Carolina Academic Press 2002)
13.^ Anton Powell (1995). The Greek World. Psychology Press. p. 303. ISBN 978-0-415-17042-0.
14.^ Black, p. 130
15.^ Black, p. 131
16.^ Black, p. 132
17.^ Black, p. 157
18.^ Hieroglyphs can be found in (Collier and Manley pp. 27, 29, 154)
19.^ (Budge The Gods of the Egyptians Vol. 1 p. 416)
20.^ robert a armour (2001). gods and myths of ancient egypt. American University in Cairo Press. ISBN 978-977-424-669-2.
21.^ Budge The Gods of the Egyptians Vol. 1 p. 416)
22.^ "The Oxford Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology", Edited by Donald B. Redford, p. 190, Berkeley, 2003, ISBN 0-425-19096-X
23.^ "Reflections on Osiris", John D. Ray, p. 64, Profile books,2002, ISBN 186197 490 6
24.^ Barry J. Kemp (2005). 100 hieroglyphs: think like an Egyptian. ISBN 1-86207-658-8.
25.^ "The Essential Guide to Egyptian Mythology:The Oxford Guide", p190, Berkeley Reference, 2003, ISBN 0-425-19096-X
26.^ The Book of the Dead. Gramercy. 1995-01-23. pp. 576–582. ISBN 978-0-517-12283-9.
27.^ (Budge The Gods of the Egyptians Vol. 1 pp. 418-20)

References[edit source]
Black, James Roger. "The Instruction of Amenemope: A Critical Edition and Commentary--Prolegomenon and Prologue", Dissertation University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2002 [1]
Budge, E. A. Wallis. The Egyptian Book of the Dead: (The Papyrus of Ani) Egyptian Text Transliteration and Translation. New York: Dover Publications, 1967. Originally published in 1895.
Budge, E. A. Wallis. The Gods of the Egyptians: Studies in Egyptian Mythology — Volume 1. New York: Dover Publications, 1969. Originally published in 1904.
Collier, Mark and Manly, Bill. How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs: Revised Edition. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.
Faulkner, Raymond. The Egyptian Book of the Dead. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 1994. ISBN 0-8118-6489-8
Mancini, Anna. Maat Revealed: Philosophy of Justice in Ancient Egypt. New York: Buenos Books America, 2004.
Strudwick, Helen. The Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt. Singapore: De Agostini UK, 2006.
Journey through the afterlife, Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead edited by John H. Taylor ( the British Museum Press 2010. London ISBN 0-7141-1989-X)

 

 

Know I’ve done wrong, left your heart torn
Is that what devils do?
Took you so long, where only fools gone
I shook the angel in you!
Now I’m rising from the crowd
Rising up to you!
Feel with all the strength I found
There's nothing I can’t do!

Chorus:
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?

It’s unforgivable,
I stole and burnt your soul
Is that what demons do, hey?
They rule the worst in me
Destroy everything,
They blame on angels like you, hey!
Now I’m rising from the crowd
Rising up to you!
Filled with all the strength I found
There's nothing I can’t do!

Chorus:
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
Uh, uh, uh, uh!
Oh, oh!

Told you once again,
Do this again, do this again, oh!
I told you once again,
Do this again, do this again, oh, oh!

Chorus:
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?
I need to know now, know now
Can you love me again?

John Newman : "Love Me Again" Lyrics

www.sweetslyrics.com › Artists starting with J‎

Know I've done wrong, left your heart torn / Is that what devils do? / Took you so long, where only fools gone / I shook the angel in you!/ Now I'm rising from the ...

 

 

-
-
-
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
1
M
13
4
4
N
=
5
-
1
N
14
5
5
E
=
5
-
1
E
5
5
5
M
=
4
-
1
M
13
4
4
O
=
6
-
1
O
15
6
6
S
=
1
-
1
S
19
10
1
Y
=
7
-
1
Y
25
7
7
N
=
5
-
1
N
14
5
5
E
=
5
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
42
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
123
51
42
-
-
4+2
-
-
-
1+2+3
5+1
4+2
-
-
6
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
6
6
6

 

 

-
-
-
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
M+N
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
E+M
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
4
S+Y+N+E
63
18
9
M
=
4
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
123
42
33
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+2+3
4+2
3+3
M
=
4
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
6
6
6

 

 

-
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
6
1
-
5
-
+
=
17
1+7
=
8
=
8
=
8
-
-
-
14
-
-
15
19
-
14
-
+
=
62
6+2
=
8
=
8
=
8
-
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
5
4
-
-
7
-
5
+
=
25
2+5
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
13
-
5
13
-
-
25
-
5
+
=
61
6+1
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
13
14
5
13
15
19
25
14
5
+
=
123
1+2+3
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
4
5
5
4
6
1
7
5
5
+
=
42
4+5
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
TWO
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
2
=
8
=
8
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
5
occurs
x
4
=
20
2+0
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
=
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
-
-
22
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
23
-
-
9
-
42
-
24
2+2
--
-
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
2+3
-
-
--
-
4+5
-
2+4
4
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
5
-
-
9
-
9
-
6
-
--
4
5
5
4
6
1
7
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
4
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
5
-
-
9
-
9
-
6

 

 

M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
6
1
-
5
-
+
=
17
1+7
=
8
=
8
=
8
-
-
14
-
-
15
19
-
14
-
+
=
62
6+2
=
8
=
8
=
8
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
5
4
-
-
7
-
5
+
=
25
2+5
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
13
-
5
13
-
-
25
-
5
+
=
61
6+1
=
7
=
7
=
7
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
13
14
5
13
15
19
25
14
5
+
=
123
1+2+3
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
4
5
5
4
6
1
7
5
5
+
=
42
4+5
=
9
=
9
=
9
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
4
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
2
=
8
=
8
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
5
occurs
x
4
=
20
2+0
2
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
=
7
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
23
-
-
9
-
42
-
24
--
-
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
2+3
-
-
--
-
4+5
-
2+4
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
5
-
-
9
-
9
-
6
--
4
5
5
4
6
1
7
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
9
M
N
E
M
O
S
Y
N
E
-
-
5
-
-
9
-
9
-
6

 

 

Mnemosyne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mnemosyne‎

The Twelve Titans: Oceanus and Tethys, Hyperion and Theia, Coeus and Phoebe, Cronus and Rhea, Mnemosyne, Themis, Crius, Iapetus Children of Oceanus:

Mnemosyne

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mnemosyne (1881), a Pre-Raphaelite interpretation of the goddess by Dante Gabriel Rossetti[1]

Greek deities
series

Titans
Olympians
Aquatic deities
Chthonic deities
Personified concepts
Other deities

Titans

The Twelve Titans:
Oceanus and Tethys,
Hyperion and Theia,
Coeus and Phoebe,
Cronus and Rhea,
Mnemosyne, Themis,
Crius, Iapetus
Children of Oceanus:
Oceanids, Potamoi, Calypso
Children of Hyperion:
Helios, Selene, Eos
Daughters of Coeus:
Leto and Asteria
Sons of Iapetus:
Atlas, Prometheus,
Epimetheus, Menoetius
Sons of Crius:
Astraeus, Pallas, Perses

Mnemosyne (/nɨˈmɒzɨniː/ or /nɨˈmɒsɨni/; Greek: Mνημοσύνη, pronounced [mnɛːmosýːnɛː]), source of the word mnemonic,[2] was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. The titaness was the daughter of Gaia and Uranus and the mother of the nine Muses by Zeus:
Calliope (Epic Poetry)
Clio (History)
Erato (Love Poetry)
Euterpe (Music)
Melpomene (Tragedy)
Polyhymnia (Hymns)
Terpsichore (Dance)
Thalia (Comedy)
Urania (Astronomy)

In Hesiod's Theogony, kings and poets receive their powers of authoritative speech from their possession of Mnemosyne and their special relationship with the Muses.

Zeus and Mnemosyne slept together for nine consecutive nights, thus birthing the nine Muses. Mnemosyne also presided over a pool[3] in Hades, counterpart to the river Lethe, according to a series of 4th century BC Greek funerary inscriptions in dactylic hexameter. Dead souls drank from Lethe so they would not remember their past lives when reincarnated. Initiates were encouraged to drink from the river Mnemosyne when they died, instead of Lethe. These inscriptions may have been connected with Orphic poetry (see Zuntz, 1971).

Similarly, those who wished to consult the oracle of Trophonius in Boeotia were made to drink alternately from two springs called "Lethe" and "Mnemosyne". An analogous setup is described in the Myth of Er at the end of Plato's Republic.

 

THE MYTH OF ER THE MYTH OF RE

 

 

Mnemosyne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mnemosyne

Zeus and Mnemosyne slept together for nine consecutive nights, thus birthing the nine Muses. Mnemosyne also presided over a pool[3] in Hades, counterpart to the river Lethe, according to a series of 4th century BC Greek funerary inscriptions in dactylic hexameter. Dead souls drank from Lethe so they would not remember their past lives when reincarnated. Initiates were encouraged to drink from the river Mnemosyne when they died, instead of Lethe. These inscriptions may have been connected with Orphic poetry (see Zuntz, 1971).

Similarly, those who wished to consult the oracle of Trophonius in Boeotia were made to drink alternately from two springs called "Lethe" and "Mnemosyne". An analogous setup is described in the Myth of Er at the end of Plato's Republic.

 

-
-
-
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
M+N
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
E+M
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
4
S+Y+N+E
63
18
9
M
=
4
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
123
42
33
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+2+3
4+2
3+3
M
=
4
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
6
6
6

 

 

Z
=
8
-
4
ZEUS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
Z
26
8
8
-
-
-
-
3
E+U+S
45
18
9
Z
=
8
-
4
ZEUS
71
26
17
-
-
-
-
-
-
7+1
2+6
1+7
Z
=
8
-
4
ZEUS
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
1+4
-
Z
=
8
-
4
ZEUS
5
8
8

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
ZEUS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
Z
26
8
8
-
-
-
-
3
E+U+S
45
9
9
Z
=
8
-
4
ZEUS
71
17
17
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
MNEMOSYNE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
M+N
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
E+M
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
4
S+Y+N+E
63
18
9
M
=
4
-
9
MNEMOSYNE
123
42
33
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
12
-
13
First Total
194
59
50
-
-
1+2
-
1+3
Add to Reduce
1+9+4
5+9
5+0
-
-
3
-
4
Second Total
14
14
5
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+4
1+4
-
-
-
3
-
4
Essence of Number
5
5
5

 

 

JESUS AND THE GODDESS

THE SECRET TEACHINGS OF THE ORIGINAL CHRISTIANS

Timothy Freke & Peter Gandy 2001

Pag 147

Motifs of the Mystical Marriage

"Olive oil was a familiar symbol in the ancient world for wisdom and was associated with the Goddess."

 

-
-
-
-
-
OLIVE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
O+L
27
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
2
V+E
27
9
9
O
=
6
-
5
OLIVE
63
27
27
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
OIL
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
L
12
3
3
O
=
6
-
3
OIL
36
18
18
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
13
-
8
First Total
99
45
45
-
-
1+3
-
-
Add to Reduce
9+9
4+5
4+5
-
-
4
-
8
Second Total
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
-
-
4
-
8
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
CHRISTOS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
-
2
H+S
27
18
9
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
3
T+O+S
54
9
9
C
=
3
-
8
CHRISTOS
111
48
30
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
11
Add to Reduce
144
63
45
-
-
-
-
1+1
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+4
3+6
4+5
-
-
5
-
2
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

I
=
2
-
1
I
9
9
9
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
A
=
1
-
2
AM
14
5
5
A
=
1
-
2
AT
21
3
3
M
=
4
-
4
MAAT
35
8
8
A
=
1
-
2
AM
14
5
5
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
16
Q
16
Add to Reduce
144
63
45
-
-
1+6
-
1+6
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+4
3+6
4+5
-
-
4
Q
4
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

JESUS AND THE GODDESS

THE SECRET TEACHINGS OF THE ORIGINAL CHRISTIANS

Timothy Freke & Peter Gandy 2001

Pag 23

The Exodus Allegory

Like the Jews in Exodus, in the gospel story Jesus is called out of Egypt, where he has been hiding, like the soul within the body. The Gospel of Matthew explains that this is to fulfill the prophecy 'Out of Egypt I have called my son.'48 Here. as elsewhere in the gospels, we should read 'fulfil the prophecy' as a coded reference to the source of the symbolic motif and intended allegorical meaning.

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
O
=
6
-
3
OUT
56
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
5
EGYPT
73
28
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
H
=
8
-
4
HAVE
36
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
C
=
3
-
6
CALLED
37
19
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
2
MY
38
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
-
3
SON
48
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
42
-
26
First Total
318
120
30
-
2
4
6
8
5
6
7
8
18
-
-
4+2
-
2+6
Add to Reduce
3+1+8
1+2+0
3+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+8
-
-
6
-
8
Second Total
12
3
3
-
2
4
6
8
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
Essence of Number
3
3
3
-
2
4
6
8
5
6
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
9
O
=
6
-
3
OUT
56
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
E
=
5
-
5
EGYPT
73
28
1
-
1
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
9
H
=
8
-
4
HAVE
36
18
9
-
-
-
-
9
C
=
3
-
6
CALLED
37
19
1
-
1
-
-
-
M
=
4
-
2
MY
38
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
S
=
1
-
3
SON
48
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
42
-
26
First Total
318
120
30
-
2
4
6
18
-
-
4+2
-
2+6
Add to Reduce
3+1+8
1+2+0
3+0
-
-
-
-
1+8
-
-
6
-
8
Second Total
12
3
3
-
2
4
6
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
Essence of Number
3
3
3
-
2
4
6
9

 

 

ADVENT 1159 ADVENT

 

 

OSIRIS ISIS ISISOSIRIS

 

 

EGYPT O EGYPT

FOR YOU WE THOUGHT AND DIED

 

 

This Old Man - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Old_Man

"This Old Man" is an English language children's song, counting and nursery rhyme with a Roud Folk Song Index number of 3550.
The origins of this song are obscure. The earliest extant record is a version noted in Anne Gilchrist's Journal of the English Folk Dance and Song Society (1937), learnt from her Welsh nurse in the 1870s under the title "Jack Jintle" with the lyrics:



My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but one,
And I can play nick-nack upon my own thumb.
With my nick-nack and pad-lock and sing a fine song,
And all the fine ladies come dancing along.

My name is Jack Jintle, the eldest but two,
And I can play nick-nack upon my own shoe.
With my nick-nack, etc.[1]

The more familiar version goes like this:

 

This old man, he played one,
He played knick-knack on my thumb;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played two,
He played knick-knack on my shoe;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played three,
He played knick-knack on my knee;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played four,
He played knick-knack on my door;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played five,
He played knick-knack on my hive;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played six,
He played knick-knack on my sticks;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played seven,
He played knick-knack up in heaven;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played eight,
He played knick-knack on my gate;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played nine,
He played knick-knack on my spine;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.

This old man, he played ten,
He played knick-knack once again;
With a knick-knack paddywhack,
Give the dog a bone,
This old man came rolling home.



A similar version was included in Cecil Sharp and Sabine Baring-Gould's English Folk-Songs for Schools, published in 1906.[2] It was collected several times in England in the early twentieth century with a variety of lyrics. In 1948 it was included by Pete Seeger and Ruth Crawford in their American Folk Songs for Children and recorded by Seeger in 1953. It received a boost in popularity when it was adapted for the 1958 film The Inn of the Sixth Happiness by composer Malcolm Arnold as "The Children's Marching Song", which led to hit singles for Cyril Stapleton and Mitch Miller.[3]

 

THIS IS THE SCENE OF THE SCENE UNSEEN

THE UNSEEN SEEN OF THE SCENE UNSEEN THIS IS THE SCENE

 

 

NETERS TEN NET ENTERS

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
4
MIND
40
22
4
2
OF
21
12
3
9
HUMANKIND
95
41
5
18
First Total
189
90
18
1+8
Add to Reduce
1+8+9
9+0
1+8
9
Second Total
18
9
9
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

ESOTERIC O SECRET I ESOTERIC

ESOTERIC 6 SECRET 9 ESOTERIC

ESOTERIC O SECRET I ESOTERIC

 

 

-
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
9
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
+
=
21
2+1
=
3
=
3
=
3
-
-
24
9
-
-
-
-
15
-
-
-
+
=
48
4+8
=
12
1+2
3
=
3
-
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
5
-
2
-
2
5
3
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
16
5
-
20
-
20
5
3
+
=
69
6+9
=
15
1+5
6
=
6
-
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
24
9
16
5
-
20
15
20
5
3
+
=
117
1+1+7
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
6
9
7
5
-
2
6
2
5
3
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
ONE
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
2
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
2
=
12
1+2
3
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
=
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
=
9
13
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
32
-
-
9
-
45
-
27
1+3
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3+2
-
-
-
-
4+5
-
2+7
4
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
5
-
-
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
6
9
7
5
-
2
6
2
5
3
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
5
-
-
9
-
9
-
9

 

I

THE FLAYED ONE

 

9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
9
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
+
=
21
2+1
=
3
=
3
=
3
-
24
9
-
-
-
-
15
-
-
-
+
=
48
4+8
=
12
1+2
3
=
3
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
5
-
2
-
2
5
3
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
16
5
-
20
-
20
5
3
+
=
69
6+9
=
15
1+5
6
=
6
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
24
9
16
5
-
20
15
20
5
3
+
=
117
1+1+7
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
6
9
7
5
-
2
6
2
5
3
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
=
9
=
9
9
X
I
P
E
-
T
O
T
E
C
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
2
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
-
-
-