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THE

FAR YONDER SCRIBE

AND OFT TIMES SHADOWED SUBSTANCES WATCHED IN SOME AMAZE

THE

ZED ALIZ ZED

IN

SWIFT REPEAT SCATTER STAR DUST AMONGST THE LETTERS OF THEIR PROGRESS

 

 

NUMBER

9

THE SEARCH FOR THE SIGMA CODE

Cecil Balmond 1998

Cycles and Patterns

Page 165

Patterns

"The essence of mathematics is to look for patterns.

Our minds seem to be organised to search for relationships and sequences. We look for hidden orders.

These intuitions seem to be more important than the facts themselves, for there is always the thrill at finding something, a pattern, it is a discovery - what was unknown is now revealed. Imagine looking up at the stars and finding the zodiac!

Searching out patterns is a pure delight.

Suddenly the counters fall into place and a connection is found, not necessarily a geometric one, but a relationship between numbers, pictures of the mind, that were not obvious before. There is that excitement of finding order in something that was otherwise hidden.

And there is the knowledge that a huge unseen world lurks behind the facades we see of the numbers themselves."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

AS ABOVE, SO BELOW.

"Heaven above, heaven below; stars above, stars below; all that is above thus also below."

*-Kircher, Prodrom. copt. pp. 193 and 275

Page 1

." 'As above, so below.' Is this great 'word' a sacramental phrase, a saying of wisdom, an aphorism, a mystic formula, a fundamental law; or a two-edged sword of word-fence that will probably do the wielder serious damage, if he is not first put through careful training in its handling-which ?

Whether this famous saying is of Hermetic origin or no, we will not stay formally to inquire. In essence it is probably as old as human thought itself; and, as probably, the idea lying underneath it has been turned topsy-turvy more frequently than any other of the immortal company.

(*Copt. Text omitted)

Page 2

'As above, so below' doubtless enshrines some vast notion of analogical law, some basis of true reason, which would sum up the manifold appearances of things into one single verity.

But. the understanding of the nature of this mystery of manifoldness from the one-all one and one in all-is not to be attained by careless thinking, or by some lucky guess, or by the pastime of artificial correspondencing.

Indeed-if the truth must out-in ninety-nine cases of a hundred, when one uses 'as above, so below' to clinch an argument, we find that we have begged the question from the start, ended where we began, and asserted the opposite of our logos.

Instead of illumining, not only the subject we have in hand, but all subjects, by a grasp of the eternal verity concealed within our saying, we have reversed it into the ephemeral and false proposition: 'As below, so above.' Deus, inversus, est Demon; and there's the devil to pay.
But fortunately there is some compensation even in this in an illogical age; for, as all the mystic world knows, Demon is nothing else but Deus inversus.

Yes, even along our most modern lines of thought, even in propositions and principles that are every day coming more and more into / Page 3 / favour in the domain of practical philosophising, we find our ageless aphorism stood upon its head with scantiest ceremony.

In the newest theology, in the latest philosophy, we find a strong tendency to revive the ancient idea that man is the measure of the universe­whether we call this opinion pragmatism or by any other name that sounds more sweetly. ' As below,' then, 'so above.'

In fact we do not seem to be able to get away from this inversion. We like it thus turned upside down. And I am not altogether sure that it is not an excellent exercise thus to anthropomorphise the universe, if only to fling the shadow of our best within on to the infinite screen of the appearance of things without. For is not man kin really with all these-worlds, systems, elements, and spaces and infinitudes, times and eternities?

But this way of looking at the thing does not as a rule' intrigue' the beginner in mystic speculation; it is all more naive.

Fascinated with some little known fact of the below, marvelling at some striking incident that has come under his notice-striking, fascinating for him, of course-he usually puts a weight upon it that it cannot bear, exaggerates a particular into a universal, and, with a desperate plunge of joy, imagines that he has finally arrived at truth / Page 4 / -taking his topsy-turvy' as below' for the eternal' as above.'

He has not the faintest notion that, had he truly reached to that 'above,' he would know not only the solitary 'below' that has come dazzlingly into his cosmos, but every other' below' of the same class.

But again from this height of ' philosophising,' let us come down to mystic commonplace. Of things physical we have certain definite knowledge, summed up in the accurate measurements and observations, and by the general mechanical art, of modern science. Beyond this domain there is for mechanical science x simply; for the 'seeing' mystic, however, there is not a simple x, but an indefinite series of phases of subtler and subtler sensations.

Now, as every intelligent reader knows, it is just the nature of these extra-normal impressions that is beginning to be critically investigated, on the lines of the impersonal method so justly belauded by all scientific workers.

In this domain, of such intense interest to all beginners, how shall we say our 'as above' applies? And here let us start at the beginning; that is to say, the first discrete degree beyond the physical-the psychic or so-called , astral.'

What constitutes this a discrete degree? Is it / Page 5 / in reality a discrete degree? And by discrete I mean, is it discontinuous with the physical; that is to say, is there some fundamental difference of kind between the two ?-' East is east, and West is west'; Psychic is psychic, and Physical is physical. But how? Sensationally only, or is it also logically to be distinguished; is there a fundamental law of difference between them?

The first difficulty that confronts us is this: That, however keen a man's subtler senses may be, no matter how keenly' clear-seeing' he may have become, he seems unable to convey his own immediate experience cleanly to a second person, unless, perhaps, that second person can' see' with the first.

Try how he may, he is apparently compelled to fall back on physical terms in which to explain.

Indeed, it is highly probable that all that has been written on the' psychic,' has produced no other impression on non-psychic readers than that it is a subtler phase of the physical. And this, presumably, because the very seer himself in explaining the impressions he registers, to himself, that is, to his physical consciousness, has to translate them into the only forms that consciousness can supply, namely physical forms.

Page 6

Indeed, there seems to be a gulf fixed between psychic and physical, so that those direct impressions which would pass thence to us, cannot. In other words, they cannot, in the very nature of things, come naked into this world; they must be clothed.

Now if this is true, if this is an unavoidable fact in the constitution of things, then the very nature of the psychic is removed from the nature of the physical by an unbridgeable gulf. 'East is east, and West is west.'

But is it really true ? Is it only that, so far, no one is known who can bridge the gulf perfectly? Or supposing even that there be those who can so bridge it; is it that they are unable to make their knowledge known to others, simply because these others cannot bridge the gulf in their own personal consciousness, and therefore cannot follow the continuum of their more developed brethren?
But even supposing there is a material continuity from physical to psychic; it would seem that we must, so to speak, 'go' there, and that it cannot' come' here. In other words, the really psychic cannot be truly registered in the physical, the image cannot correctly reproduce the prototype; for if it could, the one would be the other. What, then, is the nature of the difference of quality or of degree?

Page 7

How, again, we ask, does psychic fundamentally differ from physical?

Can we in this derive any satisfaction from speculations concerning the so-called' fourth dimension' of matter?

This is a subject of immense difficulty, and I do not here propose to enter into anything but its outermost court. All that I desire to note, for the present, is that all analogies between an imagined' flatland' and our three-dimensional space, and between the latter and the supposed fourth-dimensional state, are based upon the most flagrant petitio principii:. It is a case of , As below, so above,' with a vengeance!

'Flatland '-space of two dimensions, plus the further gratuitous assumption of two-dimensional beings who have their living and their moving therein-is inconceivable as matter of any kind. A superficies is-an idea; it is not a thing of the sensible world. We conceive a superficies in our minds; it is a mental concept, it is not a sensible reality. We can't see it, or taste it, or hear it, or smell it, or touch it.

Our two-dimensional beings are at best figments of the imagination. They are absolutely inconceivable in terms of space as entities; they can't move, they can't be sensible of one another. For in the abstract concept called a surface, there can be no position from the standpoint of itself / Page 8 / and things like it, but only from the standpoint of a consciousness outside it. Even the most primitive sense of touch would be non-existent for our' flatlanders,' for there would be nothing to touch. And so on, and so forth.

Therefore, to imagine how three-dimensional things would appear to the consciousness of a 'flatlander,' and from this, by analogy, to try to construct four-dimensional things from a series of three-dimensional phenomena, is, apparently, a very vicious circle indeed.

We can't get at it that way. We have to seek another way, a very different' other way,' apparently, by means of which we may get out of three dimensions into-what? Into-two, either way or every way? Who knows?

Any way, the later Platonic School, curiously enough, called the' psychic' the' plane' -that is, the two-dimensional and not the four­dimensional, according to one of the so-called Chaldaean Oracles: "Do not soil the spirit nor turn the plane into the solid." The' spirit' corresponds to what we have been calling the , psychic' in its lower phase, and the' plane' to the' psychic' in its higher.
As Psellus says, in commenting on this logion : " The Chaldaeans clothed the soul in two vestures ; the one they called the spirituous, which is woven for it (as it were) out of the sensible body; / Page 9 / the other the radiant, subtle and impalpable, which they call the plane."

Higher than this were the' lines' and' points,' which pertained to the region of mind-formal and formless.

What, then, again we ask, is the psychic proper as compared with the physical? How do things appear on the psychic proper? For so far, in the very nature of things, whenever we talk' down here' of the psychic we have to talk of it in terms of the physical.

In what, then, to use a famous term of ancient philosophising, consists its' otherness' ? Is' otherness' in this to be thought of as distinguished simply by a gulf in matter, a gap ?-this seems to be absurd; for" nature does not leap," she also" abhors a vacuum.

Here then we are confronted with the other side of the shield, with the unavoidable intuition that there is a continuum in matter from grossest to subtlest; and we may speculate that if a human entity were to progress through this series of grades of matter in space, he would have successively to leave his various' vehicles,' molecular, atomic, inter-atomic, etc.-in states of ever greater tenuity-while, as in the case of John Brown, his soul would" go marching on," until it arrived at the last limit-whenever or / Page 10 / wherever that may be, in a universe that ever at every point enters into itself!
The idea of a cosmic' stuff' or 'matter' that has the power to roll itself up continuously into itself, so to speak, is exceedingly illuminative, if thought of as the symbol of a process. But it requires to be interpreted in terms of force, as well as in terms of matter, before it can yield any adequate meaning.

All things, then, would appear to be solidified down here by the" sky's being rolled up carpet­wise," to paraphrase the Upanishad. For the , sky' is here the' ether' -the one substance, the simplicity of things. The' above' is thus , involved' into the' below'; and if we could only follow the process, perchance we should then be able really to understand something of the truth underlying our aphorism.

As a matter of fact, this continuum of matter is the ground on which all scientific thinking is based; perpetual and continuous transfor­mation but no sudden leaps-orderly evolution, no miraculous or uncaused spontaneous surpnses.
Now, if this be true, it follows that, some day, the direct line of 'descent' from' psychic' to physical may be controlled mechanically by human invention; and so the psychic be made physically visible to even the most hopelessly / Page 11 / profane (from a psychic standpoint). And not only so, but the errors of human observation, which vitiate all present psychic investigation, may, in that Utopian future, be obviated in as marvellous a fashion as the errors of physical observation are now eliminated, by the wonder­fully delicate instruments already devised by human ingenuity.

This seems immediately to follow from the major premise of a continuum of this nature; and many people believe it is so, and base themselves upon it as on a sure foundation of fact. But, somehow or other, I am by no means satisfied that this will be the case. Is our salvation to be dependent upon machines; are we to become dei ex machinis ?

But what has all this to do with' As above, so below'? Why, this: If tbe sensible world rises by stages (and descends by stages, too, for that matter) from this gross state familiar to us by our normal senses, through ever finer and finer grades of matter, we finally reach-ay, there's the rub; what do we reach? Where do we start?

The truth of the matter is-be it whispered lowly-you can't think it out in terms of matter. But take the' ever so thin' idea for the moment, as sufficiently indefinite for any mystic who is not a metaphysician, using the latter term in / Page 12 / the old, old way, where physis included all nature, that is, natura, the field of becoming.

As above, so below'-how many stages above ? Let us say seven, if it is so desired. The' above' as compared with the' below' wiJl then be very nebulous indeed, a sort of inner­most' primitive ground' of some at present inconceivable mode and fashion. There may be 'correspondence,' but that correspondence must be traced through numerous orders of matter, where the very next succeeding order to the physical already acts as force, or energy, to the matter which falls beneath our normal senses.

Here we are again, at the very outset, face to face with the' psychic' or 'astral' x-which, compared with the physical, should be regarded as a 'system of forces' rather than as a mould of the same fashion and form as the physical.

And if this view is, at any rate, one stage nearer the reality than the interpretation of the psychic by purely physical imagery and symbolism-what can possibly be the nature of our No. 7, or No. 1, 'primitive ground' stage; when already at the first remove we exhaust all our possibilities of description?

For we certainly do not get much' forrarder' by simply flinging the forms and pictures of the physical, as it were, on to a series of mirrors / Page 13 / which differ from one another only in their tenuity. At any rate, it appears so to the reflecting mind; though at the same time it seems quite as natural that the impressions of the subtler senses should be clothed in physical forms when reflected in physical consciousness.

Let it be understood once for all, that I have not the slightest pretension in any way to decide between these apparent contradictions of sense and reason; indeed, I personally believe it to be unseemly and disastrous to attempt to separate the eternal spouses of this sacred marriage. In most intimate union must they ever be together, to give birth to the true Man-who is also their common source.

Still it is of advantage continuously to keep before our minds the question: What is a prototype; what is a paradigm; what a logos­a reason; what an idea? What, for instance, to use Platonic terms, is the autozoon, the animal itself, or that which gives life to itself, as compared with all animals; what the ever the , same,' as compared with all the' others' ?

The intuition of things that underlay the philosophising of the Western world at its birth in conscious reasoning, from the time of Pythogoras onwards, gives us preliminary help, it is true, in thus setting the noumenal or ideal over against the sensible or phenomenal-the / Page 14 / mind over against the soul. But the character­istic of union is that it 'sees,' not another, but itself, and knows it ever' sees' itself.

This is the' Plain of Truth,' where ever are the true paradigms, and ideas, and reasons of all things; and when we say' where' we do not mean place or space; for it is the everlasting causation of these, and is not conditioned by them, but self-conditions itself.

It would take too long further to pursue this high theme in the present adventure. One thing alone I have desired to call attention to: the careless translation of living ideas into rigid notions, the danger of falling too readily into that higher materialism that Stallo calls the' reification' of concepts. For when you have' reified' your hypothesis - be it gravity, or atomicity, or vibration-and reduced it to a rigid notion, a definite objective something for you, you have still got only the shadow and not the substance; the appearance, the phenomenon, and not the underlying truth, the noumenon.

But to conclude; that' sight' which reveals to man the' reasons' of things, is surely a more divine possession than that' sight' which sees the sensible forms of things only, no matter how exquisitely beautiful and grandiose such forms may be.

And when I say' sees' the' reasons' of things, / Page 15 / do I mean the intellectual grasping of some single explanation, some formula, some abstraction ~ By no means; I mean by' reason' logos in its most vital sense. I mean that when we 'see' the' reasons' of things, we see our' selves' in all things; for our real selves are the true ground of our being, the that in us which constitutes us 'sons of God '-logoi, as He. is Logos, kin to Him. 'As above, so below.' What, , above' where there is no place, no dimension, and no time?

But even so, is the' above' superior to the , below '? Ah, that is where the mind breaks down, unable to grasp it. Is Eternity greater than Time ~ Is the Same mightier than the Other?
Of course it is, we say, as so many in so many schools have said before. But is it really so?

Are we not still in the region of the opposites; neither of which can exist without the other, and each of which is co-equal with the other?

\Ve are still in the region of words-words simply in this case, not living reasons; though the same term does duty for both in Greek­logos; showing yet once again that in verity Demon est Deus inversus.
No words indeed can tell of Him-or of That, if you so prefer, though the neuter gender is as / Page 16 / little appropriate as the masculine. " Thou that art to be worshipped in silence alone! "

As Thou art above, so art Thou below; as Thou art in Thyself, so art Thou in Man; as Thyself is in Thee, so is Thy Man in Thyself­now and for ever.

 

WORDS SWORD SWORD WORDS

WORDS

SWEAR OR DIE

 

 

SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

AS ABOVE, SO BELOW.

"Heaven above, heaven below; stars above, stars below; all that is above thus also below."

*-Kircher, Prodrom. copt. pp. 193 and 275

Page 75

"He is for ever crucified upon the cross of the eternal opposites; and the passion of passions for man is the mystery of the creative energy which ever seeks to realise itself in the union of complementary natures."

 

 

H
=
8
-
2
HE
13
13
4
S
=
1
-
3
SHE
32
14
5
-
-
9
-
5
Add to Reduce
45
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
4+5
2+7
-
-
-
9
-
5
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

1875-1955

Page 466

"Had not the normal, since time was, lived on the achievements of the abnormal? Men consciously and voluntarily descended into disease and madness, in search of knowledge which, acquired by fanaticism, would lead back to health; after the possession and use of it had ceased to be conditioned by that heroic and abnormal act of sacrifice. That was the true death on the cross, the true Atonement."

 

 

IN SEARCH OF THE MIRACULOUS

Fragments of an Unknown Teaching

P.D.Oupensky 1878- 1947

Page 217

" 'A man may be born ,but in order to be born he must first die, and in order to die he must first awake.' "
" 'When a man awakes he can die; when he dies he can be born' "

Thus spake the prophet Gurdjieff.

 

 

HOLY BIBLE

Scofield References

Page 1117. A.D. 30.

Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily,
I say unto thee, Except a man be born again,
He cannot see the kingdom of God.

St  John  Chapter   3  verse  3
3     +     3     3     x     3
6        x        9
54
5 + 4
9

 

 

SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

AS ABOVE, SO BELOW.

"Heaven above, heaven below; stars above, stars below; all that is above thus also below."

*-Kircher, Prodrom. copt. pp. 193 and 275

Page 17

II

HERESY

"After the way which they call heresy, so worship I the God of my fathers."-PAUL, in Acts xxiv. 14.

PAUL was a heretic, Jesus was a heretic, Socrates was a heretic, the Buddha was a heretic. Indeed we might continue the list with most of the greatest names in history, and certainly with the names of all the founders of religions, philosophies and sciences.

It is an instructive spectacle to see how every effort to make men think, and to render them more self-conscious, has been resisted with out­cry, contumely and bitterness. The resistance to the new impulse is invariably begotten of devotion to that which in its day was new; for the heresy of to-day frequently becomes the orthodoxy of to-morrow. It is the swing of the pendulum.

The pioneers of the world have invariably been considered heretics, for they are ever those who seek to shake themselves free from the inertia of the established order of things; they / Page 18 / labour in the pains of a new birth, striving to free themselves from the womb of convention, to come forth regenerate into the sunlight of self-conscious realisation.

The lover of wisdom is thus a natural heretic for the orthodox of the moment, and his views and beliefs must naturally be considered by the lovers of things-as-they-seem-to-be as disruptive of their most cherished convictions.

But is the lover of wisdom simply a heretic, in the ordinary sense of the word, when judged by an experience that looks beyond the conven­tional standards of the moment, both as to heresy and orthodoxy? I think not. He is a heretic in a far more extended sense. So heretical, indeed, that he may in many things be more orthodox than the orthodox; he looks beyond conventional orthodoxy and heresy towards a reconciliation of contraries, in the state of understanding that can appreciate all views at their just value.

This at any rate is the ideal of such a lover; though undoubtedly many who think they are such lovers, are still content to remain in the inertia of a new convention, after they have freed themselves from the inertia of the generally accepted conventions of their day.

It is of course heretical in the Western world of to-day to believe in the doctrines of karma and reincarnation; equally so is it considered / Page 19 / heretical, by many new believers in these doctrines, to hold to the dogmas of vicarious atonement and the immediate creation of the soul at birth.

And yet the doctrine of vicarious atonement cannot be altogether foreign to the root-idea that lies at the back of the Mahayana Buddhist faith, for example, which, while basing itself on the doctrines of karma and reincarnation, at the same time teaches the renunciation of Nirvana, and the remaining on earth to save humanity. There is induhitably a measure of vicariousness in this doctrine; otherwise, if men have entirely to save themselves, there would be no meaning in preaching such an ideal.

Again, the doctrine of Southern Buddhism with regard to the unreality of the soul is practically the same, in some of its forms, as the belief in the creation of a new soul at birth.
These apparent contradictions, then, are not so utterly incompatible and mutually exclusive as they may seem to be at first sight; on the contrary, the evidence afforded by a study of the existing developments of these doctrines, and by a deeper acquaintance with the results of a more searching analysis into their fundamental nature, seems to point to another side of the question, where the contraries seem to begin to take on the nature of each other, and their / Page 20 / irreconcilability appears but an outward show of hostility, veiling the mystery of an intimate friendship.

For if the true Path of Wisdom lies precisely in the midst of all contraries, and the traveller on this Way is he who delights in the sport of magical transformation, whereby" the right becomes the left, and the left the right, the above the below, and the below the above, and the male with the female neither male nor female," as one of the old wisdom-sayings has it, then surely he will find, even in the most contradictory doctrines, some common elements that can become, as it were, the solvent which shall eventually transmute the two into a living unity. For Wisdom is that which includes all contraries.

To me it has been one of the greatest joys of such study, that the more I have learned of the nature of the Gnosis, or by whatever other name we may choose to call the Wisdom that transcends normal knowledge, the more I have realised that no doctrine that has ever held the minds and hearts of men, is without some measure of ensouling truth.

I have found that many a doctrine which, at first, I rejected as manifestly absurd, was seem­ingly so only because I had not learned to look at it with the right focus; I had paid more / Page 21 / attention to what foolish people had said about it, than to what the wise had said, and had not let the doctrine speak for itself in the court of uncommon pleas.

For example, the dogma of creation out of nothing used to distress me, until I came across a pleader in that court of universal justice-old Basilides, who spoke wisely about the creation of the things-that-are from the things-that-are-not, so that I could link up the idea with the Sat and Asat of the Upanishads, and find contentment in the thought.

Of course I do not for one moment pretend that anyone else must be satisfied with what Basilides says. It was he, however, who showed me the way out, although the orthodox call him a desperate heretic and overwhelm him with abuse. And so perhaps he may help some others, who prefer even a one-eyed gnosis to a blind faith, and who believe it is not a sin to use their intellect (as far at any rate as it will go) for fear of becoming unpopular with those who, in the pride of not-knowing, shout Credo quia absurdum on all occasions.

Many of my readers must be familiar with the tyranny of a Church whose stereotyped answer to every questioning of its authority is: This is the pride of the intellect, my son, the most subtle of all sins. The virtue of humility, the / Page 22 / greatest of the virtues, is what you lack. It is in vain you protest your humility, when it is just this pride of intellect which makes you refuse now, at this moment, to submit yourself to the Church's authority.

What this type of mind can never see, is that there is a right and wrong use of pride, and a wrong and right use of humility. Pride and humility are one of another, and the pride of humility is as much pride as any other form of that passion. The humble use of pride in God's good gift of reason is more truly worship of Him than a debasing of oneself before the tyranny of self-interest, that arrogates to itself the dominion over the souls of men.

It is this jealous spirit of monopoly in God's good things that has given birth to all the horrors of religious persecution. Men are not ashamed to pray to their God to deliver them from all infidels and heretics as anathema. And times without number they have taken care to make this prayer come true by fire and sword and rack. And the irony of it all is that those nearest to them in faith, are invariably regarded as the most damnable.

It is, indeed, a remarkable thing that when differences arise among those who have previously been most closely united in religious faith and aspiration, then is the hostility most bitter and / Page 23 / relentless. We see it on all sides. What is the reason of this great bitterness?

May it not be, in some measure, that those who have been so closely associated in religious thinge, who have so intensely and blindly believed that theirs was the only way, theirs the one means of salvation for all men, who are convinced that there should be one Church, and that their own, are enraged beyond measure at the shattering of their hopes by the dissent of their brethren, and believe that it is their late comrades who are solely responsible for the outrage they have suffered, instead of recognising that they have throughout been living in a fool's paradise, and that their late associates deserve their deepest thanks for bringing them to their senses?

There can never be uniformity of belief so long as man remains as he is; and God forbid that humanity should ever become a mechanical will-less organism! The end of man is not that he should be made in one mould; the destiny of the nations is not that the ideal of a grim industrial age should be realised, and so an engine be evolved which shall turn out a host of like products of monotonous similarity.

The end of man is knowledge of man preparatory to union with God. God is not only one but many, single and manifold; and the / Page 24 / knowledge of this manifoldness is as necessary to true Gnosis as is the knowledge of unity. Gnosis is the knowing of these two as the necessary complements each of the other; and the proper gnostic meditation is the holding of both in mind at once, in a balanced contemplation, which will afford the right conditions for the truth to come to birth, in a fruitful conception of practical wisdom, that can find expression in all moods and modes of thought and action.

It is of course impossible to prevent the believers in one set of exclusive doctrines regarding the lover of this wisdom as a heretic; but it should be possible for such lovers to be on their guard against falling into this naIve duality, and selecting a set of dogmas as orthodox, when the sole heresy for' those in Gnosis' should be the ceasing from the effort to reconcile even the most appalling contradictions.

For surely one of our most cherished hopes is that one day we may be initiated into the final truth, and learn how God and Devil are two sides of one Ineffable Mystery, which indeed even now, in our ignorance, we are forced to believe, in spite of our inability to raise the veil, and in spite of the danger we all recognise in preaching such a doctrine to those unprepared morally and spiritually.

If I am not entirely mistaken, it is precisely / Page 25 / because the stereotyping of one particular form of faith is considered no longer to be desirable, that the spirit of the new age is endeavouring above all things to bring us face to face with contradiction on contradiction, to give us no pause and no peace, so that when we have thought at last we were safe in one position, established for ever in some great formula, we are suddenly shaken out of our inertia by the potent energy of some new idea that is forced upon our notice.
It is only thus that our little minds can be stretched into the all-embracing nature of the Great Mind that holds all opposites in steady poise within it. It is the Titanic forces of expansion, the true Stretchers or Expanders of sympathy and consciousness and knowledge, that make our little minds elastic, so that they may be able to extend in true ecstatic understanding of the most mind-shattering contradic­tions, antitheses and paradoxes.

'What, then, can heresy and orthodoxy, in their ordinary connotations, mean to us, when it should be our joy to embrace them both and transcend them

It will of course be objected by the many that a plain man wants a plain doctrine, and that this reconciliation of contraries is a juggler's business.

Page 26

Well, we are not objecting to plain doctrines for plain folk; they are laid down with admirable precision in all the great religions, and we would no more think of doing away with them than of abolishing the police regulations.

They are the bye-laws of the ethical code of the higher polity, and teach men to be good citizens of the world; but there is a still higher code of fundamental laws of wisdom, and one of them is precisely this reconciliation of the contraries.

It is not a juggler's business, but Divine Magic, the Great Art of Wisdom, that transmutes evil into good, and transforms the impossible into the Great Potency wherewith the Divine perpetually energises.

In the freer life of the Spirit we are for ever outbreathing some old heresy and inbreathing some new orthodoxy, and outbreathing some old orthodoxy and inbreathing some new heresy; it is the greater life of the Spirit, whereby we grow in wisdom.

But if we would practise this true science of breath, the pranayama of Gnosis, we must hold our mental breath in balance, so that the great change of gnostic tendency may be effected, that from life we may pass to light, from the vitalisation of the mind to the illumination of the life.

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Our minds are, at present, for the most part fixed; they are crystallised and formalised, and most rigidly so in the forms of our religious and scientific and philosophic beliefs. These masculine forms must be dissolved by the heat of the love of the feminine formless mind. Concentra­tion must merge into contemplation, before the true re-formation, the' enformation according to Gnosis,' can be effected, and the crystals of the formal intellect be transmuted into the living essences of pure intelligence.

How often has one paused amazed at the terror and hate of heresy displayed by the orthodox, and puzzled over the question: Why are they so terrified; why do they hate so bitterly? All the more so when it is found that the object of their detestation, not in­frequently, proves on acquaintance excellent food for thought. This seems to differ little fundamentally from the commercial instinct that finds expression in Trusts. They fear for their monopoly, their trade-prospects, their combine. For naturally one would be foolish to fear for the Truth-that, at any rate, may be trusted to look after itself.

But, it may be said that they fear for the souls of their fellows, lest they be led into error and so perish everlastingly. But have they not in this simply created a Moloch of their own / Page 28 / imagination, and would make all but their fellow­slaves pass through the fire lighted by their inhumanity, in sacrifice to the black shadow of themselves which they worship as God?

For the true lover of Wisdom there is no fear, but only joy in the unshakable belief that every questioning of opinion can end eventually only in the clearer shining forth of the Sun of Truth. His orthodoxy is to rejoice in heresy, and his heresy is to substitute any of the orthodoxies of the world for the Living Truth."

 

 

SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

Page 29

III

THE ELASTICITY OF A PERMANENT BODY

PERHAPS it may be thought that I propose, in this adventure, to treat of some recondite problem of physics; but that is not my intention. I propose briefly to consider the nature of the permanent element in a religious and inter­national body.

Many confuse the idea of body with notions of shape and form, but I would venture to suggest that form is of the mind while body is of substance. There is a doctrine that man is possessed of a 'permanent body,' the substantial ground, as it were, from which proceed and to which return the births and deaths of his impermanent appearances, the perennial root of his evolutionary becomings, and the storehouse of his diversified experiences.

It is not asserted that this' body' is unconditionally everlasting, but rather that it is permanent in the sense of lasting as long as
man desires himself to be a separate individual./ Page 30 / It is his last limit as man, his' Ring Pass Not' until the Great Day' Be one with Us,' when man transcends individuality, and wins his freedom from the dominion of the spheres of evolution, by making joyful surrender of himself,-that is, of every thought of possessions of his own as apart from others, even of possession in the substance of his so-thought individuality. All his powers of their own selves make joyful surrender of themselves to the Great Powers, and thus becoming these Powers, as Trismegistus says, he is in God.

But this is apotheosis, the transcending of the man-state of separate existence, and the entering into the Communion of Those-that-are; that is to say, the energising in the Everlasting Body of all things.

The' permanent body,' then, is not the Ever­lasting Body, but the age-long substantial limit of the separated man-consciousness. How long this reon of substantial limit lasts, depends on the nature of the man's activities; nevertheless this , body' must in any case be considered as permanent, when contrasted with the length of days of the bodies of incarnation which a man uses in his many lives on earth, or in the' three worlds.'

When, however, we come to consider the meaning of 'body' in this connection, we should / Page 31 / be careful to keep our ideas concerning it as fluid as possible. We are here on the very borderland of individuality, and it depends entirely on the nature of the activities of the man whether, or no, the substance of this' body' shall be so condensed and crassified as to form , sheaths' to veil and dim the consciousness of the Self, or so wisely enformed and woven into such fine textures that it can supply' vestures ' of glory and radiance for the manifestation of the greater mysteries.

The nature of this' body' changes completely, according as the desire of the man is set to 'go forth,' or the will of the man is fixed to 'return.' \Ve therefore find it described in the ancient books under quite contradictory epithets, such as ignorance and bliss; for it is on the border­land between the particular and the general, the individual and the cosmic.

It is indeed one of the most difficult concepts for us to understand; for if we understood it really, we should have solved the riddle of what is called in Indian philosophy maya (illusion), and avidya (nescience ), and karana, that is to say' causal,' in the sense of its being the cause of our continuing to proceed forth into duality, and therefore the root of ignorance and the source of illusion. Nevertheless at the same time it is also the vehicle of our return to reality, / Page 32 / and our means of contact with unity; as such it is the complement of knowledge, and the spouse of the Divine energising.

It is, therefore, evident that if we call it 'body,' we shall be doing less violence to the meaning of its actual nature, by qualifying it with the contradictory epithet' spiritual,' than by leaving it unqualified, to the danger of its being confused with notions of physical bodies. I should prefer to call it substance rather than matter, vehicle rather than body.

The legitimate lord of this living nature is Atman or Spirit, the Self; this pure substance is corrupted by the misdeeds of men.
When we consider these mysteries from the human point of view-that is, as related to our individual selves-we have, it is true, some immediate feelings, intuitions and experiences to go upon; but when we proceed to argue, on analogy, with regard to 'bodies' other than our own, we run the risk of setting up our limited selves as a measure of the universe.

When, therefore, we come to consider a body of individuals, we must be very careful not to beg the question, by assumming that we are dealing with a problem of a like nature to that of an individual human being. We are here face to face with the idea of a group, and should rather seek analogies in whatever notions we / Page 33 / may have, as to the nature of that far more difficult concept which is sometimes called the ' group-soul,' or ' group-spirit.'

This idea connotes something that is other than the individual. The term is generally applied to animals, and not infrequently, with­out more ado, we conclude that the human indi­vidual is vastly superior, and in our conceit thank God that we have got beyond that stage. But this is a short-sighted view, based upon the comparison of a single man with a single animaL The group-soul idea, I would venture to think, is connected with far wider conceptions.

In the first place, it is connected with the tradition of the' sacred animals,' which all but a few in the West have relegated to the limbo of exploded superstitions. The' sacred animals' are said to be 'lords of types,' of whom the mass of animals of that type are, as it were, the corpuscles of their body. These' corpuscles' are ever coming and going, ever being born and dying; but so long as that' type' is manifested, there is a permanent vehicle for it even on the physical plane. These' lords of types,' it is said, are great intelligences of the Master-mind; they are the truly' sacred animals,' types of intelli­gence as well as orderers of modes of life.

Now what obtains among the animals, we may well believe, is not in principle confined to / Page 34 / them alone; it is rather a showing forth, in modes and forms that man can distinguish plainly in the external world, of the mysteries of his own greater nature.

As there are forms and modes without, so tbere are forms and modes within; and within our own kingdom there is, I would venture to suggest, a precise analogy with the animal group­soul and the lords of its types.

Families, clans, and peoples, are all, according to types, conditioned by super-human intelli­gences, and representative of the' permanent bodies' of such greater beings. Here the bond is blood; and blood is, I venture to think, more potent than mind, using the term mind here as indicative of mind in individual man.

When, however, we come to consider a religious body, we are confronted with a still more difficult problem; and, therefore, whatever suggestions one ventures to put forward, must be advanced with all reserve.

I can well believe that the real work of such a body may be the evolution of a conscious instrument, or permanent ground, for the incarnation or manifestation of a Great Soul; that is to say, that while at the same time it affords the conditions for its individual members to perfect themselves, it should also have a common object that no individual in it can achieve by him­ / Page 35 / self, and that this object should be the endeavour to realise consciously a corporate common life, by means of which the power, wisdom and love of a Great Soul may manifest itself to the world.

Page 35

This, I believe, is also a question of' blood,' for 'the blood is the life.' But this blood will be the Blood of those who are' of the Race of Him.'

There is much talk of a 'new race,' and some people are looking for a new type of race on the lines of the old separated nations and peoples but I would fain believe that the' new race' will, as it has ever been prophesied concerning it, be of every nation under heaven, as far as its physical bodies are concerned.

This has been attempted before; nations and communities of religionists have boasted themselves to be the people, are doing so to-day. This exclusiveness should be avoided, if we would live according to reality and grow in wisdom. Performance, and not the making of claims, should be our business, if we would attain to gnosis.

The Spirit that we desire to see incarnate is, I believe, not the spirit of the individual, but a Spirit that subordinates individuality to the good of the whole.

Many are endeavouring after this ideal in manifold instinctive ways. Some, again, have / Page36 / the ambition consciously to set about this great work, and knowingly to be about this holy business; they long to come into con­scious contact with a Great Soul of the order of Him who uses the whole body of humanity as His Body, and knows that all types of bodies and souls and minds are necessary for the purpose of the expression of His Life.
With such an enlightening belief, it is scarcely possible to think that anyone particular type of religion will absorb the rest, any more than we can believe that one member or limb of a body can absorb the rest; for if it should be so, it would be along the lines of disease and not of health.
Therefore, if we would consciously realise the life of the whole, we are bound to accept as the condition of our common endeavour that we shall make no distinctions of creed, sex, class, or country. The bond of union is to go deeper than any of these distinctions; for the bond that binds us together as members of a natural family in our inner nature, must surely be of a spiritual order.
Now we are told by science that" a body is perfectly elastic when it has the property of resisting a given deformation equally," and we are further informed that" all bodies have different elasticities at different temperatures."

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Temperature, in the case of living beings, applies especially to the blood; and temperature, when thought of in connection with the deeper meaning we have ventured to give to the idea of blood, in an organism bound together for a spiritual purpose, is rather temperament.
To be perfectly elastic, therefore (and their aim is surely eventual perfection), the members of such a body should have the property of resisting any given deformation equally. They should have the will to resist equally throughout the body-that is to say, in every unit or cor­puscle of which it is composed-any temporary deformation from the type. Those who have not the power of resisting and remain deformed, necessarily cease for the time to realise that they form part of the permanent elastic body of this spiritual type.
The most apparent nature of this type seems to me to be very clear! y set forth in the ethical teachings of all the great religions. The further marvels of its glorious nature are for the most part hidden from us, for they transcend the individual consciousness. But this much we can know, that it is this type or mould of being that develops in us, or impresses upon our substance, what we very rightly call moral character.
The permanent element must therefore be / Page 38 / sought in the power of resistance to all de­formations from rectitude,-to any impressions but those of the Great Souls that are lords of truly human types, and who, we may believe, manifest their greater nature for men's conscious­ness through groups of like-wi1led human beings.
Elasticity is further defined in the dictionaries as "possessing the power or quality of re­covering from depression or exhaustion; able to resist a depressing or exhausting influence; capable of sustaining shocks without permanent injury: as elastic spirits."
Let us, then, whatever religious body we may belong to, strive to be ever more and more elastic. "Elastic spirits," an excellent combination! That is the business we should ever be about, the great work.
Re-formation, re-adjustment, re-storation and perpetual re-freshment must ever be more and more possible for spiritual cosmopolitans. Elasticity of body, soul and spirit is the aim, that so men may individually and collectively mirror forth the activities of some Great Soul that shall vehicle the true Mind of Wisdom.

 

 

SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

XVI.

MYSTIC REALITY

Page 221

" IN the modern Western world in general, and perhaps nowhere more so than in England, there exists an innate prejudice against all that savours of the mystic life. Not only among the people, but also among those who set the thought - fashion of the day, the mystic is viewed with suspicion when not treated with contempt.
If we seek to discover the' reason' for this prejudice, the answer comes back loudly from all sides: Mysticism is not practical. It is assumed as incontestable that the one business of man here on earth is to be practical; and thereon it is concluded with emphasis that any departure from this clear duty diminishes man's efficiency and lessens his virtue.
The present adventure is a very brief con­sideration of this matter. It will neither take up the cudgels to do battle blindly for so-called mystics against so-called philistines, nor will it
attempt in any way to lessen the worth of the / Page 222 / practical virtues or diminish the value of the theoretical powers; it will rather endeavour to find new meanings for old names, by seeking to discover what is best in both the theoretical (in its ancient and native sense of contemplative) and the practical (or pragmatic, or even poetic, that is, poetic in its primitive meaning). For when these natural and necessary, mutual com­plements of man's energy are divorced, his gnostic nature must, by the very fact, remain sterile and unproductive of living ideas. It is only by their perpetual union that man can give birth to himself in wholeness, perfection and freedom, and so be ever self-vitalised.
Now, there can be no doubt that what has been called mysticism in the past, must over and over again have to plead guilty to insisting
more strongly on the divorcement of those two modes of man-soul than on their union. Man­kind is so naturally absorbed in the' practical,' that the most violent methods have had to be used to turn his attention away from it to the 'contemplative,' and the contrasts and opposi­
tions have thus been painted in the most lurid and glaring colours.
" Brahman is true; the world is false." Such fierce statements of absolute dualism we find set forth as fundamentals in many a devotional faith and religious philosophy. And for the

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most part the adherents of the faith or followers of the thought-school never stop to consider the elementary fact, that no such proposition of naive contrast can in the nature of things set forth the sum of truth; nor is it perceived that as long as man thinks in this mode of duality, so long must he, in the very nature of things, be still bound in his personal mind,-that self-referencing daimonion which is the fabricator of all such contrasts, that marvellous godlet of perpetual division that
separates all things by its janus-faced mode of seemg.
It is the truly magical or instantaneous mind alone that can embrace in its vast receptivity every pair, every contrast, every opposition, and every opposite the personal practical mind can in vent. Not only so, but for it each one of every pair must immediately and naturally com­plete itself by means of its co-partner, which it must have with it to make its existence possible. In the consciousness of this magical mind, with all such pairs both complements must exist immediately and simultaneously the one with the other; or, to put it from another point of view, every single separate object is instantly full-filled, perfected, or transformed into a whole­ness, by the magical mind that spontaneously completes everyone object by all else.

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It is not proposed, in this short adventure, to inquire into the noumenal nature of theo­retical reality as a truth abstracted from the changing phenomena of practical reality, but rather to insist that there is in essence and fact only one Truth, of which the theoretical and practical, or rather the theoric and pragmatic, realities, noumenal and phenomenal energies, are the simultaneous in-breath and out-breath of its instantaneous life.
This view refuses to divorce the practical reality from the theoretical, for such a divorce­ment is to it unthinkable. It does not assume, to suit the prejudices of the insufficient, that the
contemplative reality is true and the practical false; nor, contrariwise, that the practical is the
only reality and the theoretical the baseless fabric of a dream. It does not elaborate a theory of illusion with which to label the mystery of the ever-becoming, and refuse to see truth in the infinite change of appearance; rather it refuses to regard Nature as the concealer of God, in the sense of the Deluder or Great Illusionist, and views her as the means of manifestation of the Divine, His eternal complement and faithful spouse, whereby He perpetually reveals Himself.
Here there is no question of reality being spirit as set over against matter, or of the actualisation of reality being conditioned by

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a scale of increasing rarity of matter-the le SI'! matter the more spirit, the more matter the less, and therefore the less reality, and vice versa; for this view refuses to beg the question of the superiority of one over another of those mysterious and naturally eternal co­partners and co-eq nals.
According to this practical theory, if there be a sequence, a scale, a gradation, of 'planes' of existence, no one of these is to be considered as in itself superior to any other in respect of reality; for the only way of thinking such a schema as self-existent, in any thorough and complete fashion, is by making the series ever end where it begins, and begin where it ends­that is, in the mode of life conditioned by the form of a circle, the superficial expression of the more perfect symbol, the sphere. That is say, the series both begins and ends at every moment of its existence, and every moment of its exist­ence is the middle point of its being; and therefore every moment is equally proximate to reality.
To realise this more vitally, the circle figure must be converted into a living symbol; that is to say, into a sphere of which the substance is in perpetual flux, ever entering into itself and issuing from itself; and this not only for the whole substance as a unity, but for every
15

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atom of the substance. So that wherever you as person may be in the process, you are in the midst of it; while as monad, that is, as magical mind, you embrace the whole process in yourself.
Reality is not conditioned by matter alone, nor is it conditioned by spirit alone; for matter is not without spirit, nor spirit without matter. They must in the very nature of things co-exist; and every phase of their co-existence is in itself practical reality and theoretic reality in mutual em brace.
This suggests that we have not to go some­where else to find Truth, but that Truth is always as much here as there, wherever we may be; and that the explanation of one state of consciousness in terms of another is not im­mediate self-realisation, but a departure from the practical into the theoretical, or vice versa, and so a divorcement of the twain instead of a deeper union.
It is often said by the hopeful (or? despairing): Ah, well, we cannot know here; but all will be revealed unto us when we are in heaven (or even, when we are dead !). This has always seemed to me to be a very unsatisfactory ex­pectation; for it can in no way satisfy the practical mind that requires the immediate revelation of the mystery of the actual con­

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sciousness. Every state we are in is, so long as we are in it, 'physical' or 'natural'; when we are no longer in it, it pertains to memory which is not immediate, but subjective or out of the practical present.
But it may be asked: What of the man who is dead and no longer possessed of a physical body 1 From what has been said above, it follows that he still has a 'physical,' or ' natural,' body in some grade or other of the' physical' labyrinth of the ever-becoming.
But you wil1 say: The chain is broken; for his normal physical body is not. To this it may be rejoined: His separated physical body, in the ordinary sense of the term, has been dissolved, it is true; but may it not be that the link of the , physical' is stil1 there for him? He is still a continuum, whether we speculate as to the existence of 'permanent atoms,' or now think of his physical' body,' in the state which we normally call physical, as inhering in, or con­ditioned by, all the bodies of humanity, or even of all the creatures of creation; its mode is changed, but its essence still is.
But it may be further objected: The mystic consciousness is consciousness of unity; that
alone is the mystic reality. To this we may l reply: If by unity is meant some abstract state set over against diversity, then that by itself is

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no more reality than is diversity when regarded as set over against unity. Unity is union rather than oneness; unity as abstract oneness is an empty abstraction, void and lifeless. Unity as an essential concomitant of reality cannot be without its co-partner di';'ersity; and therefore the attempt to attain to unity as a something entirely apart from diversity, means a suicidal departure from reality, in so far as the attempt is to attain to what has no existence apart from its complement. Unity is conditioned by diversity and diversity by unity; if either goes, both go.
Mystic reality is rather the simultaneous realisation of both; one in many and many in one. Life is unity; multitude is power or manifoldness. The mystery of division is that of mind as creator of form, and the mystery of
union is that of mind as dissolver of form. That life, powel" and mind in their essential nature can be apart from one another, is un­thinkable.
It is, therefore, a somewhat confusing use of language to speak of the' formless planes,' when
the very idejt of a plane connotes differentiation, and therefore form. To be free of a thing does not mean that we turn our backs on it, or run from it, as the devil is said to run from holy water. The first condition of being free of a / Page 230 / thing is to be equally content whether we have it or have it not. To be free of form connotes the possibility of taking any form at will; to be free of change means that one is ever changing. True life is this power of freedom; to be stuck in one form of body, or feeling, or thought, to be incapable of change, is true death. That which is ever changing is that which is instan­taneous in life, and therefore essentially superior to change; that which can take all forms is ever present in every moment of time, and alone is immortal.
From the point of view, then, of this mystic reality, or let us say of the man who is attempting perpetually to initiate himself into the gnosis of self-realisation, what meanings should be given to the theoretical and practical 1
In the first place it would seem that, above all else, he should strive to value them equally, and so keep them in himself in perfect balance and poise, for his goal is the Birth of the Justified, the Birth of Horus. The theoretical, or contemplative, for him is the mode of his nature in which he conceives the living ideas of Truth, and the practical is the giving birth to these ideas in the actual. To know Truth, he must live Truth. To live Truth his thoughts, words and deeds must match; so alone can / Page 231 / Truth for him become instantaneous and immediate. There is then a straight path in himself from within without, and the without instantly becomes the within for him; reality is actualised as one and not as twain, as self and not as other, and Truth is all in all.
'Phe practical is then no longer conditioned by his personal opinions and selfish sentiments; for the practical for him is now all that is being done, the karma of the world, the inevitable complement and completion of the theoretical-that is, the great plan and self­counsel of the Divine. With this Divine economy he now works naturally, and therefore contentedly, blissfully; for he recognises by experience that his co-working with Nature is the necessary condition of understanding, of spiritual gnosis. For Nature is wise, the Mother of wisdom, even as Wisdom is the Mother of nature; and the working with Nature brings wisdom to birth in man, and the working with Wisdom makes man's nature Divine.
The Divine impulse which. has brought into
existence the whole method of our modern science, which boasts itself so proudly to be the handmaid of the practical, is the innate
longing in man to discover the secrets of Nature, that so he may know the laws of her / Page 232 / 232
SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES.
operations, and thus by working with them free himself from the bonds of ignorance.
If the present' practical' of science very readily lends itself to subserving the selfish interests of man, this should not be a matter of much surprise. For whenever a great impulse starts in humanity, the first manifesta­tions of it naturally disclose what appears to be the wrong side of things, or the topsy­turvydom of it. It is the manure which enriches the soil in which the true seed is sprouting.
And this may be seen very clearly in our own day, when a new and powerful interest has arisen in all that pertains to the soul. What may seem to many of us to be a degra­dation of all that should be most pure and holy, is the natural manuring of the soil.
That on all sides amateur practitioners of 'occult arts,' and swarms of charlatans of all kinds, should have arisen to cater for public curiosity, and that books and articles and pamphlets and fly-sheets should be spawned forth in shoals, setting forth every nostrum under the sun with glaring self-advertisement, loudly extolling the advantages of 'business clairvoyance,' and-of course for a consideration -imparting tips for strengthening the will for 'business purposes,' etc., etc., and all the rest

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of the' occult' baits for the lovers of self­aggrandisement,-all this is only what the experienced would expect, and proves that the impulse is 'great.' It is the manuring of the soil, and the wrong side of the great impulse to make life practical and actual here and now.
Is it not also the same in no few branches of science herself? Is not physical science not infrequently made the handmaid of the false practical in the sense of commercial? The sympathies of the mystic and idealist must be all on the side of the famous dis­coverer of one of the rare elements, who when the ubiquitous and earth-bound interviewer asked him what was the practical application of his discovery, what was its value for commercial purposes, replied: No use what­ever, thank God!
The seeker for mystic reality refuses to measure the practical by so Iowa canon; money-value is not a vital standard, but a corpse-measurer. It is not a natural but an artificial thing, and as such belongs to the region of death.
This, however, does not mean to say that commerce and business are not admirable means of training in the school of life; and perhaps one of tnf\ mO>it. {>{\mfrn.t;"n- M~~~~ _J:

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the present renaissance of mystic and psychic studies, and of endeavours to live the spiritual life, is that many men and women of business are found in the ranks; in fact, they may be said to form the majority.
Indeed, if we review the history of this movement for the last thirty years, we shall be compelled to recognise that it has been inspired by a strong desire to grapple with the facts of life, on the very battlefield of the struggle for existence. It differs from almost every movement of a similar nature in the past. Rarely do we find in it people who retire from the practical life of the world, or schemes to establish retreats and communities apart.
All this, I think, points to the fact that the inner determination of this new endeavour is that it should be really practical, and should labour to solve the problems while face to face with them. There is to be no retiring or retreating; heaven must be brought down to earth, that earth maybe raised to heaven. Realisation to be of practical worth must be here and now; that which is not of practical worth is theoretically still-born, if not an abortion. The history of the mysticism of the past teems with these births out of due time that could not support the stress of the natural life of the world, and had to be kept

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alive artificially. There have been broods of mystics who have had to live most of their time in semi-dream consciousness, or in artificial and cotton-wool surroundings; they have consequently been little able to affect the world.
Let us hope that this time a more natural brood will be reared, fit and eager, first to battle with circumstances, and then, when grown, ready so to use all circumstances with wisdom that they will be recognised, by all who have eyes to see, as the truly practical men of the world, con­trollers of every environment, in that by their plasticity and adaptability they can transmute the seemingly most inopportune circumstances into occasions for great happenings and god-like activity.
It should, however, never be forgotten that there is no necessity for anyone to put off the attempt to strive for self-realisation to some more favourable occasion, least of all for some other life when science and environment will have made conditions easier. This means simply being content to be re-born a 'mollusc.'
Self-realisation has been obtained by many
a soul whose name has been set in the Book of the Heroes, millennia before modern science was heard of. Regeneration is a natural thing,
not the product of the artificial mind moulded

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by the opinions of the day. Indeed it is just this which ever distorts and atrophies the natural mind, which it is the whole duty of man to preserve in purity. For the natural mind is God-given, while the artificial mind is man-made.
But for the moment enough of this matter.


SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

ON THE WAY OF THE PATH.

Page 216

"More wise is the advice which is given in that / Page 217 / excellent little treatise known as Light on the Path, when it says:

" Seek out the way.
Seek the way by retreating within.
Seek the way by advancing boldly without."

This is balanced advice, the way of the life of the spirit, which lives in the union of the in­breath and out-breath; indeed in the mode of the spirit the in-breath and out-breath are not consecutive but simultaneous. This admirable little book tells of the nature of the way with true insight; and there must be few who cannot see that such instruction completely rebuts the charge of unpracticality that has so often been brought against the mystic way; for it shows that its pursuit is the most immediate, intense, wakeful, agile, living thing in the world. Spontaneous intensification of awareness, instan­taneous operation, immediate comprehension, perpetual agility and adaptability,-these spirit­ual powers and many another of like nature can hardly be called unpractical; they are rather magical, and miraculous.

It is therefore well said in The Voice of the Silence:
"Thou canst not travel on that Path before thou hast become that Path itself."
Here' travelling' is prefaced by and becoming connotes something other than / Page 218 / intellectual appreciation, where there is per­petual separation of subject and object; it signifies rather the life-side of things, and first realises itself in the modes of sym-pathy and corn-passion. It is the Path of Life and not of Death; and travelling on the Path of Life is conditioned by self-motivity and not by compulsion.
And here I would quote perhaps one of the most magnificent instructions preserved to us from the Gnosis of antiquity. It is found in the Trismegistic tractate known as the 'Mind to Hermes' (Corp. Herm. xi. (xii.) 20), and runs as follows:

"Then in this way know (or think) God; as having all things in Himself as thoughts, the whole Cosmos itself.
"If, then, thou dost not make thyself like unto God, thou canst not know Him. For like is knowable to like alone.
"Make, then, thyself to grow to the same stature as the Greatness that transcends all measure; leap forth from every body; transcend all Time; become Eternity (the lEon); and thus shalt thou know God.
"Conceiving nothing is impossible unto thy­self, think thyself deathless and able to know all,-all arts, all sciences, the way of every life.

Page 219

"Become more lofty than all height, and lower than all depth. Collect into thyself all senses of all creatures,-of fire, and water, dry and moist. Think that thou art at the same time in every place,-in earth, in sea, in sky; not yet begotten, in the womb, young, old, and dead, in after-death conditions.
"And if thou knowest all these things at once, - times, places, doings, qualities, and quantities,-thou canst know God."
And the teacher, who evidently spoke out of the depths of his own experience, concludes with the comfortable words:
"So to be able to know good, to will, and hope, is a Straight Way, the Good's own Path, both leading there and easy.
"If thou but sett'st thy foot thereon, 'twill meet thee everywhere, 'twill everywhere be seen, both where and when thou dost expect it not,-waking, sleeping, sailing, journeying, hy night, by day, speaking, and saying naught. For there is naught that is not image of the Good. "
This is the Path of the Spirit, the One Path, the eternal type, and immanent reality, of every way that leads to it. There is no need to pursue after it, to try to find it some other way, or on some other plane, or in some other state; it is ever present, always immediate. The only / Page 220 / way to seek it is by becoming it at every moment of time; joyously becoming circum­stance that it may no longer hinder but per­petually reveal itself as the Straight Way to Union with the Divine.

 

 

SOME MYSTICAL ADVENTURES

G. R. S . Mead 1910

MYSTIC REALITY.

Page 230

"To be free of form connotes the possibility of taking any form at will; to be free of change means that one is ever changing. True life is this power of freedom; to be stuck in one form of body, or feeling, or thought, to be incapable of change, is true death. That which is ever changing is that which is instan­taneous in life, and therefore essentially superior to change; that which can take all forms is ever present in every moment of time, and alone is immortal.
From the point of view, then, of this mystic reality, or let us say of the man who is attempting perpetually to initiate himself into the gnosis of self-realisation, what meanings should be given to the theoretical and practical 1
In the first place it would seem that, above all else, he should strive to value them equally, and so keep them in himself in perfect balance and poise, for his goal is the Birth of the Justified, the Birth of Horus. The theoretical, or contemplative, for him is the mode of his nature in which he conceives the living ideas of Truth, and the practical is the giving birth to these ideas in the actual. To know Truth, he must live Truth. To live Truth his thoughts, words and deeds must match; so alone can / Page 231 / Truth for him become instantaneous and immediate. There is then a straight path in himself from within without, and the without instantly becomes the within for him; reality is actualised as one and not as twain, as se]f and not as other, and Truth is all in all.
'Phe practical is then no longer conditioned by his personal opinions and selfish sentiments; for the practical for him is now all that is being done, the karma of the world, the inevitable complement and completion of the theoretical-that is, the great plan and self­counsel of the Divine. With this Divine economy he now works naturally, and therefore contentedly, blissfully; for he recognises by experience that his co-working with Nature is the necessary condition of understanding, of spiritual gnosis. For Nature is wise, the Mother of wisdom, even as Wisdom is the Mother of nature; and the working with Nature brings wisdom to birth in man, and the working with Wisdom makes man's nature Divine.

Page 218

ATOMIC ENERGY

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
25
-
-
ATOMIC
61
25
25
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ENERGY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
7
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
8
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
9
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
10
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
G
=
7
11
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
Y
=
7
12
1
Y
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
38
-
-
ENERGY
74
38
38
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
15
6
14
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+4
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC ENERGY
9
9
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
7
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
8
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
9
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
10
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
G
=
7
11
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
Y
=
7
12
1
Y
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
15
6
14
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+4
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC ENERGY
9
9
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
8
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
8
-
E
=
5
7
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
N
=
5
8
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
E
=
5
9
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
R
=
9
10
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
G
=
7
11
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
Y
=
7
12
1
Y
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
15
6
14
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+4
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC ENERGY
9
9
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
8
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
8
-
E
=
5
7
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
N
=
5
8
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
E
=
5
9
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
-
G
=
7
11
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
Y
=
7
12
1
Y
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
R
=
9
10
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
15
6
14
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC ENERGY
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+4
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
ENERGY
74
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC ENERGY
135
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC ENERGY
9
9
9
-
1
2
3
4
6
6
5
8
9

 

LETTERS REARRANGED NUMERICALLY

 

ATOMIC NUMBERS

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
7
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
13
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
25
-
-
ATOMIC
61
25
25
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
NUMBERS
-
Q
Q
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
7
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
U
=
3
8
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
9
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
10
1
B
2
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
11
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
12
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
S
=
1
13
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
29
-
7
NUMBERS
92
38
29
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
4
6
8
10
6
7
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
7
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
2
4
6
88
1
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC NUMBERS
9
9
9
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
7
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
13
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
8
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
7
8
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
9
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
8
-
N
=
5
7
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
8
-
U
=
3
8
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
8
-
M
=
4
9
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
7
8
-
B
=
2
10
1
B
2
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
E
=
5
11
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
8
-
R
=
9
12
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
9
S
=
1
13
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
4
6
8
10
6
7
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
7
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
2
4
6
88
1
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC NUMBERS
9
9
9
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
7
8
9

 

LETTERS REARRANGED NUMERICALLY

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
7
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
13
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
S
=
1
13
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
B
=
2
10
1
B
2
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
8
-
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
8
-
U
=
3
8
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
8
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
7
8
-
M
=
4
9
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
7
8
-
N
=
5
7
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
8
-
E
=
5
11
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
8
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
8
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
9
R
=
9
12
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
4
6
8
10
6
7
8
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
7
8
9
E
=
5
Q
6
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
2
4
6
88
1
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC NUMBERS
9
9
9
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
K
=
2
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
Q
7
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
13
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
9
A
=
1
1
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
13
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
2
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
10
1
B
2
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
C
=
3
6
1
C
3
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
U
=
3
8
1
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
M
=
4
9
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
N
=
5
7
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
E
=
5
11
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
O
=
6
3
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
I
=
9
5
1
I
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
R
=
9
12
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
4
6
8
10
6
18
-
-
-
-
-
ATOMIC NUMBERS
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
1+8
A
=
1
Q
6
ATOMIC
61
25
7
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
9
E
=
5
Q
6
NUMBERS
92
38
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
12
ATOMIC NUMBERS
153
63
9
-
2
4
6
88
1
6
9
-
-
-
-
1+5
-
1+3+5
6+3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
6
Q
6
ATOMIC NUMBERS
9
9
9
-
2
4
6
8
1
6
9

 

 

E
=
5
-
-
ENERGIES
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
G
7
7
7
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
1
S
19
10
1
E
=
5
Q
8
ENERGIES
82
55
46
-
-
-
-
-
-
8+2
5+5
4+6
E
=
5
Q
8
ENERGIES
10
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
1+0
1+0
E
=
5
Q
8
ENERGIES
1
1
1

 

 

GOD WITH US

 

G
=
7
-
3
GOD
26
17
8
W
=
5
-
4
WITH
60
24
6
U
=
3
-
2
US
40
4
4
-
-
15
-
9
Add to Reduce
126
45
18
-
-
1+5
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+2+6
4+5
1+8
-
-
6
-
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

-
-
-
THE MOONS A BALLOON
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
T
=
2
Q
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
5
Q
5
MOONS
76
22
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
2
Q
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
5
Q
7
BALLOON
71
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
16
THE MOONS A BALLOON
181
64
28
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
1
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
H
=
8
2
1
H
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
9
E
=
5
3
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
9
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
7
-
9
O
=
6
5
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
O
=
6
6
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
N
=
5
7
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
9
S
=
1
8
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
A
=
1
9
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
B
=
2
10
1
B
2
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
A
=
1
11
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
L
=
3
12
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
-
9
L
=
3
13
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
-
9
O
=
6
14
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
O
=
6
15
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
N
=
5
16
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
4
6
4
15
24
7
8
9
-
-
-
THE MOONS A BALLOON
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+5
2+4
-
-
-
T
=
2
Q
3
THE
33
15
6
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
M
=
5
Q
5
MOONS
76
22
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
Q
1
A
1
1
1
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
B
=
2
Q
7
BALLOON
71
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
10
Q
16
THE MOONS A BALLOON
181
64
28
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
-
-
1+0
Q
1+6
Q
1+8+1
6+4
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
1
Q
7
THE MOONS A BALLOON
10
10
1
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
Q
-
Q
1+0
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
1
Q
7
THE MOONS A BALLOON
1
1
1
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9

 

 

-
-
-
THE MOONS A BALLOON
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
T
=
2
Q
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
M
=
5
Q
5
MOONS
76
22
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
2
Q
1
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
5
Q
7
BALLOON
71
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
7
Q
16
THE MOONS A BALLOON
181
64
28
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
1+6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
=
1
8
1
S
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
A
=
1
9
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
A
=
1
11
1
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
T
=
2
1
1
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
B
=
2
10
1
B
2
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
7
-
9
L
=
3
12
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
-
9
L
=
3
13
1
L
12
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
7
-
9
M
=
4
4
1
M
13
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
7
-
9
E
=
5
3
1
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
9
N
=
5
7
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
9
N
=
5
16
1
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
O
=
6
5
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
O
=
6
6
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
O
=
6
14
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
O
=
6
15
1
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
7
-
9
H
=
8
2
1
H
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
4
6
4
15
24
7
8
9
-
-
-
THE MOONS A BALLOON
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+5
2+4
-
-
-
T
=
2
Q
3
THE
33
15
6
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
M
=
5
Q
5
MOONS
76
22
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
Q
1
A
1
1
1
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
B
=
2
Q
7
BALLOON
71
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
10
Q
16
THE MOONS A BALLOON
181
64
28
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
-
-
1+0
Q
1+6
Q
1+8+1
6+4
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
1
Q
7
THE MOONS A BALLOON
10
10
1
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
Q
-
Q
1+0
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Q
Q
1
Q
7
THE MOONS A BALLOON
1
1
1
-
3
4
6
4
6
6
7
8
9

 

 

Klaatu gives Helen a chance by going with her to see her friend, Professor Barnhardt (John Cleese). The Professor tries to reason with Klaatu, saying that all civilizations only change when they're at the precipice of a crisis. He says human will change, now that they are really at the edge of destruction.

 

 

YOU SAY WE'RE ON THE BRINK OF DESTRUCTION AND YOU'RE RIGHT.

BUT IT IS ONLY ON THE BRINK THAT PEOPLE FIND THE WILL TO CHANGE.

ONLY AT THE PRECIPICE DO WE EVOLVE. THIS IS OUR MOMENT DON'T TAKE IT FROM US

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Y
=
7
-
3
YOU
61
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
S
=
1
-
3
SAY
45
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
W
=
5
-
4
WE'RE
51
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
ON
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
5
BRINK
54
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
D
=
4
-
11
DESTRUCTION
148
49
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
2
AND
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Y
=
7
-
7
YOU'RE
84
30
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
-
3
RIGHT
62
35
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
50
-
55
-
607
247
58
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
3
BUT
43
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IT
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IS
28
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
4
ONLY
66
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
ON
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
5
BRINK
54
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
6
PEOPLE
69
33
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
F
=
6
-
4
FIND
33
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
4
WILL
56
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
C
=
3
-
6
CHANGE
38
29
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
63
-
50
-
595
244
64
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
4
ONLY
66
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
2
AT
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
9
PRECIPICE
84
57
3
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
D
=
4
-
2
DO
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
2
WE
28
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
2
EVOLVE
81
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
30
-
24
-
332
143
26
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
4
THIS
56
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IS
28
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
3
OUR
54
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
M
=
4
-
6
MOMENT
80
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
D
=
4
-
4
DON'T
53
17
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
-
4
TAKE
37
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IT
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
F
=
6
-
4
FROM
52
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
U
=
3
-
2
US
40
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
45
-
31
-
429
141
42
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
188
-
160
First Total
1963
775
190
-
6
14
18
12
5
42
21
32
45
-
-
1+8+8
-
1+6+0
Add to Reduce
1+9+6+3
7+7+5
1+9+0
-
-
1+4
1+8
1+2
-
4+2
2+1
3+2
4+5
-
-
17
-
7
Second Total
19
19
10
-
6
5
9
3
5
6
3
5
9
-
-
1+7
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+9
1+9
1+9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
7
Third Total
10
10
10
-
6
5
9
3
5
6
3
5
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
7
Essence of Number
1
1
1
-
6
5
9
3
5
6
3
5
9

 

 

"You say we're on the brink of destruction and you're right. But it's only on the brink that people find the will to change.

Only at the precipice do we evolve. This is our moment. Don't take it from us,"

.

WE ARE CLOSE TO AN ANSWER

236

WE ARE CLOSE TO AN ANSWER

83

WE ARE CLOSE TO AN ANSWER

2

WE ARE CLOSE TO AN ANSWER

 

 

T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
D
=
4
-
3
DAY
30
12
3
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
E
=
5
-
5
EARTH
52
25
7
S
=
1
-
5
STOOD
73
19
1
S
=
1
-
5
STILL
72
18
9
-
-
15
4
24
First Total
293
104
32
-
-
1+5
-
2+4
Add to Reduce
2+9+3
1+0+4
3+2
Q
-
6
-
6
Second Total
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+4
-
-
-
-
6
4
6
Essence of Number
5
5
5

 

 

"You say we're on the brink of destruction and you're right. But it's only on the brink that people find the will to change.

Only at the precipice do we evolve. This is our moment. Don't take it from us, we are close to an answer".

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Y
=
7
-
3
YOU
61
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
-
S
=
1
-
3
SAY
45
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
W
=
5
-
4
WE'RE
51
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
ON
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
5
BRINK
54
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
-
-
-
3
-
5
-
-
-
-
D
=
4
-
11
DESTRUCTION
148
49
4
-
-
-
-
4
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
2
AND
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
Y
=
7
-
7
YOU'RE
84
30
3
-
-
-
3
-
5
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
-
3
RIGHT
62
35
8
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
B
=
2
-
3
BUT
43
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IT
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IS
28
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
4
ONLY
66
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
5
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
2
ON
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
5
BRINK
54
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
-
-
-
-
4
5
-
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
6
PEOPLE
69
33
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
F
=
6
-
4
FIND
33
24
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
4
WILL
56
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
C
=
3
-
6
CHANGE
38
29
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
4
ONLY
66
21
3
-
-
-
3
-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
2
AT
21
3
3
-
-
-
3
-
5
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
9
PRECIPICE
84
57
3
-
-
-
3
-
5
-
-
-
-
D
=
4
-
2
DO
19
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
2
WE
28
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
2
EVOLVE
81
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
T
=
2
-
4
THIS
56
20
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IS
28
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
3
OUR
54
18
9
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
9
M
=
4
-
6
MOMENT
80
26
8
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
D
=
4
-
4
DON'T
53
17
8
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
T
=
2
-
4
TAKE
37
10
1
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IT
29
11
2
-
-
2
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
F
=
6
-
4
FROM
52
25
7
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
-
U
=
3
-
2
US
40
4
4
-
-
-
-
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
188
-
160
First Total
1963
775
190
-
6
14
18
12
5
42
21
32
45
-
-
1+8+8
-
1+6+0
Add to Reduce
1+9+6+3
7+7+5
1+9+0
-
-
1+4
1+8
1+2
-
4+2
2+1
3+2
4+5
-
-
17
-
7
Second Total
19
19
10
-
6
5
9
3
5
6
3
5
9
-
-
1+7
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+9
1+9
1+9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
7
Third Total
10
10
10
-
6
5
9
3
5
6
3
5
9
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
7
Essence of Number
1
1
1
-
6
5
9
3
5
6
3
5
9