Previous Page
  Next Page
 
Evokation
 
 
Index
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
14
15
-
-
-
19
-
-
-
-
24
-
26
+
=
115
1+1+5
=
7
=
7
=
7
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
7
8
9
-
2
3
4
5
-
7
-
+
=
83
8+3
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
10
11
12
13
-
-
16
17
18
-
20
21
22
23
-
25
-
+
=
236
2+3+6
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
+
=
351
3+5+1
=
9
-
9
=
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
+
=
126
1+2+6
=
9
-
9
=
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
1
occurs
x
3
=
3
=
3
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
2
occurs
x
3
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
3
occurs
x
3
=
9
=
9
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
+
=
4
occurs
x
3
=
12
1+2
3
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
+
=
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
+
=
6
occurs
x
3
=
18
1+8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
+
=
7
occurs
x
3
=
21
2+1
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
+
=
8
occurs
x
3
=
24
2+4
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
45
-
-
26
-
126
-
54
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4+5
-
-
2+6
-
1+2+6
-
5+4
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

...

 

 

 

 

 

26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
5
6
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
6
-
8
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
14
15
-
-
-
19
-
-
-
-
24
-
26
+
=
115
1+1+5
=
7
=
7
=
7
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
7
8
9
-
2
3
4
5
-
7
-
+
=
83
8+3
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
-
-
10
11
12
13
-
-
16
17
18
-
20
21
22
23
-
25
-
+
=
236
2+3+6
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
+
=
351
3+5+1
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
+
=
126
1+2+6
=
9
=
9
=
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
1
occurs
x
3
=
3
=
3
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
2
occurs
x
3
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
3
occurs
x
3
=
9
=
9
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
+
=
4
occurs
x
3
=
12
1+2
3
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
+
=
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
+
=
6
occurs
x
3
=
18
1+8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
+
=
7
occurs
x
3
=
21
2+1
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
+
=
8
occurs
x
3
=
24
2+4
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
9
occurs
x
2
=
18
1+8
9
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
45
-
-
26
-
126
-
54
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4+5
-
-
2+6
-
1+2+6
-
5+4
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
26
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
-
-
9
-
-
8
-
9
-
9

 

 

ADVENT 798 ADVENT

 

-
THE RAINBOW LIGHT
-
-
-
3
THE
33
15
6
7
RAINBOW
82
37
1
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
15
THE RAINBOW LIGHT
171
81
9
1+5
-
1+7+1
8+1
-
6
THE RAINBOW LIGHT
9
9
9

 

THIS IS THE SCENE OF THE SCENE UNSEEN

THE UNSEEN SEEN OF THE SCENE UNSEEN THIS IS THE SCENE

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
4
MIND
40
22
4
2
OF
21
12
3
9
HUMANKIND
95
41
5
18
-
189
90
18
1+8
-
1+8+9
9+0
1+8
9
-
18
9
9
-
-
1+8
-
-
9
-
9
9
9

 

 

PEACE BE UNTO YOU BELOVED CHILDREN OF THE RAINBOW LIGHT

 

 

1
I
9
9
9
2
AM
14
5
5
3
THE
33
15
6
8
OPPOSITE
115
43
7
2
OF
21
12
3
3
THE
33
15
6
8
OPPOSITE
115
43
7
1
I
9
9
9
2
AM
14
5
5
3
THE
33
15
6
8
OPPOSITE
115
43
7
2
OF
21
12
3
8
OPPOSITE
115
43
7
2
IS
28
19
1
3
THE
33
15
6
2
AM
14
5
5
1
I
9
9
9
6
ALWAYS
81
18
9
2
AM
14
5
5
64
First Total
793
325
109
6+4
Add to Reduce
7+9+3
3+2+5
1+0+9
10
Second Total
10
10
10
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
1+0
1
Essence of Number
1
1
1

 

 

6
BEYOND
65
29
2
3
THE
33
15
6
4
VEIL
48
21
3
7
ANOTHER
81
36
9
4
VEIL
48
21
3
7
ANOTHER
81
36
9
4
VEIL
48
21
3
6
BEYOND
65
29
2
41
First Total
469
208
37
4+1
Add to Reduce
4+6+9
2+0+8
3+7
5
Second Total
19
10
10
-
Add to Reduce
1+9
1+0
1+0
5
Third Total
10
1
1
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
-
-
5
Essence of Number
1
1
1

 

 

 

THE ATLANTIS SECRET

A COMPLETE DECODING OF PLATOS LOST CONTINENT

Alan F Alford 2001

The Athens and Atlantis Story in Brief

Page 225

" Timaeus and Critias have spent the previous evening in deep discussion about the ideal state. Moreover, he says, Critias had brought up a story `from ancient times' (ek palaios) about a war between ancient Athens and Atlantis, and it might well suit the purpose of the assignment (i.e. it describes a war)." Critias then relates his tale, or rather a concise version of it. It is the story of Atlantis in its original version — the story that has puzzled commentators for more than two thousand years.

The Athens and Atlantis Story in Brief

Critias is the next to speak, initially setting out a 'concise version' of the story. He begins his speech in Timaeus as follows:
"Let me tell you this story then, Socrates. It's a very strange one, but even so, every word of it is true. It's a story that Solon, the wisest of `the seven sages', once vouched for... The story is that our city had performed great and marvellous deeds in ancient times, which, owing to the passage of time and to the destruction of human life, have vanished. Of all these deeds one in particular was magnificent. It is this one that we should now do well to commemorate and present to you as our gift of thanks "12
In response to Critias' introduction, Socrates declares that he has never heard of this singular magnificent feat of the ancient Athenians. The onus is therefore on Critias to justify the authenticity of the story before he relates it to his host, who is one of the most wise and learned men of the day.
Critias thus explains the origins of his 'very strange' story. He assures Socrates that the story has been transmitted privately through his family across a span of four generations, beginning with his great-grandfather Dropides, who had heard the story fromSolon, a famous Athenian statesman." Solon, in turn, had learned the story in Egypt from some wise old priests at the town of Sais (this would be in the 6th century BC by our reckoning). Yes, it did seem odd that the present-day Athenians were unfamiliar with the magnificent feat of their ancestors, but this could be explained by the great antiquity of the event, which caused it to have been preserved only in the annals of the Egyptian Saites.
Critias himself had heard the story as a ten-year-old boy, when his ninety-year-old grandfather, Elder Critias, had recited it from memory at the Apaturia festival.14 He now relies on his own memory to recall what his grandfather had said concerning Solon's visit to Egypt. The crucial conversation, says Critias, occurred when Solon began to speak of Greek antiquity. It was at this point that one of the Saite priests — 'a very old man' — mocked Solon and the Greeks for their inadequate understanding of the past. "Ah Solon, you Greeks are ever children" the priest said: "You are young in soul every one of you"." He then informed Solon that: "There have been, and there will continue to be, numerous disasters that have destroyed, human life in many kinds of ways." The most serious of these, said the priest, involved deluges of fire and water, which would sweep down from the heavens at regular intervals. He then explained that the Greek myth of Phaethon contained a profound truth concerning these recurrent cataclysmic events (see citation in chapter four of this book).
The Egyptian priest then mocked Solon again, comparing his account of Greek antiquity to 'a nursery tale'. Firstly, he said, the Greeks knew only one flood (the flood of Deucalion), whereas in fact there had been a great many before. Secondly, he said there had lived in Athens 'before the greatest of these floods' a distinguished race of men who had been the progenitors of the Athenianpeople and its civilisation. This race of ancient Athenians had been the finest of all ancient civilisations in the natural justice of their laws and in their bravery on the battlefield, and yet
their deeds had been completely forgotten by Solon and the present-day race of Athenians."
Solon, astonished, then begged the Saite priest to tell him everything that he knew about the ancient Athenians, and thus it was that he learned the story of the war against Atlantis.
The priest began the story as follows:

"Your city [Athens] the goddess [Neith/Athene] founded first, a thousand years before our city [Sais], when she had received from Earth and Hephaestus the seed from which your people were to come. Now our social arrangement, according to the records inscribed in our sacred documents, is eight thousand years old. Nine thousand years ago, then, did these fellow citizens of yours live, whose laws and finest achievement I'll briefly describe to you...""
Note the implication here. The ancient Athenians, who were about to go to war against Atlantis, were the first generation of Athenians, whom the goddess Athene had created from the earth using the meteoritic seed of
Hephaestus. As we shall see, we are dealing with a people who lived aeons before the flood of Deucalion.
The priest now continues with his story:

"Now many great accomplishments of your city recorded here are awe-inspiring, but there is one that surely surpasses them all in magnitude and excellence. The records speak of a vast power that your city once, brought to a halt in its insolent march against the whole of Europe and Asia at once — a power that sprang forth from beyond, from the Atlantic Ocean. For at that time this ocean was passable, since it had an island in it, in front of the strait that you people say you call 'the Pillars of Heracles'. This island [Atlantis] was larger than Libya and Asia [Minor] combined, and it provided passage to the other islands... From those islands one could then travel to the entire continent on the other side, which surrounds that real sea beyond..."
to the clear statement here that the Isle of Atlantis lay in the Atlantic dean, beyond the Pillars of Heracles (i.e. the straits of Gibraltar).2° But to also the reference to the continent that lay beyond Atlantis 'on the er side'. This has led some commentators to suggest that the continent beyond (the so-called 'opposite continent') is America. But are things ly so simple? Unfortunately, the passage throws up two anomalies of pernatural proportions. Firstly, the Isle of Atlantis is said to be 'larger
Libya and Asia Minor combined' — a quite implausible notion. And condly, the opposite continent is said to completely surround the 'antic Ocean — a quite remarkable idea. When we stop to think about neither statement makes any sense in a geographical context.
The priest now relates to Solon a very brief account of the war:

"Now on this Isle of Atlantis a great and marvellous royal power established itself, and ruled not only the whole island, but many of the other islands and parts of the [opposite] continent as well... Now one day this power gathered all of itself together, and set out to enslave all of the territory inside the strait, including your region and ours, in one fell swoop. Then it was Solon, that your city's might shone bright with excellence and strength, for all mankind to see. Pre-eminent among all others in the nobility of her spirit and in her use of all the arts of war, she first rose to the leadership of the Greek cause. Later, forced to stand alone, deserted by her allies, she reached a point of extreme peril. Nevertheless, she overcame the invaders and erected her monument of victory. She prevented the enslavement of those not yet enslaved, and generously freed all the rest of us who lived within the boundaries of Heracles."21
This is as much detail as we are going to get concerning the war between Athens and Atlantis. The account, it must be said, is extremely sketchy. What is clear, once again, however, is that the Atlantians invaded the Ntediterranean region via the Pillars of Heracles (the straits of Gibraltar), So strictly speaking it is a Mistake to seek Atlantis anywhere but in the Atlantic Ocean

The Egyptian priest now reaches the climax or his story'
Page 228

"Further back, excessively, violent earthquakes and floods occurred, and after the onset of an unbearable day and a night, your entire warrior force sank below the earth all at once, and the Isle of Atlantis likewise sank below the sea and disappeared. That is how the Ocean in that region has come to be even now unnavigable and unexplorable, obstructed as it is by a layer of mud at a shallow depth, the residue of the island as it settled."22

This passage contains two extraordinary anomalies which must be added to the two highlighted earlier. Firstly, it is said that the entire Athenian warrior force sank into the earth at the same time as the island of Atlantis sank into the sea — a highly implausible coincidence (indeed, the fates of both sides lend a surreal and mythical note to the story). And secondly, it s suggested that the island of Atlantis turned into a shallow sea of mud — a most unlikely occurrence (even more bizarrely, it is implied that the mud caused a blockage in the Atlantic Ocean for a span of nine thousand years, right up to the time of Solon!).
True Fiction
Critias closes his report of Solon's story by emphasising the amazing correspondence between the ancient Athenians and the citizens of Socrates' ideal state.23 Referring to his opening speech as merely 'a concise version' of Solon's story, he proposes that he and Timaeus will now take turns to provide further details. Their plan is to fulfil Socrates' wish by supposing that the citizens of his ideal state — a purely imaginary people — are identical to the ancient Athenians who really existed' nine thousand years ago:
'We'll translate the citizens and the city you described to us in mythical fashion'yesterday to the realm of fact, and place it before us as though it is ancient Athens itself. And we'll say that the citizens you imagined are the very ones the [Egyptian] priest spoke about, our actual ancestors. The congruence will be complete and our song will be in tune if we say that your imaginary citizens are the ones who really existed at that time."24
There can be no clearer statement that the story of Athens and Atlantis is a literary fiction, designed for the purpose of bringing Socrates' ideal state to life. Nevertheless, whilst this fictional dimension must always be borne in mind, there is an emphasis, too, on the essential 'truth' of the story; hence the idea here that the ancient Athenians 'really existed at that time'. The question is this: are we dealing with people who 'really /Page 229 / existed' in the sense of history, or with sense of myth?
Returning to the text of Timaeus, Critias friend Timaeus who embarks on a for the subject of the origin of the Universe this connects with Socrates' ideal state Athens and Atlantis remains something of a mystery, It should be noted, however, that Timaeus' subject is Pythagorean cosmogony, and that his mystical God-Sphere, Derniourgos, i (see chapter eleven and appendix a). I and Atlantis story has a cosmic dimension?
Bearing this in mind, let us continue Timaeus' speech and proceeding to the next of Plato's works: that which is entitled Critias."

 

POSE IDEA ON I SUPPOSE

I DIE DIE I

 

 

-
POSEIDON
-
-
-
3
P+O+S
50
14
5
3
EID
18
18
9
2
O+N
29
11
2
8
POSEIDON
97
43
16
-
-
9+7
4+3
1+6
8
POSEIDON
16
7
7
-
-
1+6
-
-
8
POSEIDON
4
7
7

 

 

-
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
1
-
9
-
6
5
+
=
27
2+7
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
-
15
19
-
9
-
15
14
+
=
72
7+2
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
5
-
4
-
-
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
-
7
-
7
-
-
16
-
-
5
-
4
-
-
+
=
25
2+5
=
7
-
7
-
7
-
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
16
15
19
5
9
4
15
14
+
=
97
9+7
=
16
1+6
7
-
7
-
-
7
6
1
5
9
4
6
5
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
-
7
-
7
-
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
1
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
TWO
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
2
=
12
1+2
3
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
-
7
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
-
9
13
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
32
-
-
8
-
43
-
25
1+3
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
3+2
-
-
-
-
4+3
-
2+5
4
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
7
-
7
-
-
7
6
1
5
9
4
6
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
7
-
7

 

 

8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
1
-
9
-
6
5
+
=
27
2+7
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
15
19
-
9
-
15
14
+
=
72
7+2
=
9
-
9
-
9
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
5
-
4
-
-
+
=
16
1+6
=
7
-
7
-
7
-
16
-
-
5
-
4
-
-
+
=
25
2+5
=
7
-
7
-
7
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
16
15
19
5
9
4
15
14
+
=
97
9+7
=
16
1+6
7
-
7
-
7
6
1
5
9
4
6
5
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
-
7
-
7
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
-
4
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
2
=
12
1+2
3
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
-
9
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
32
-
-
8
-
43
-
25
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
3+2
-
-
-
-
4+3
-
2+5
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
7
-
7
-
7
6
1
5
9
4
6
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
P
O
S
E
I
D
O
N
-
-
5
-
-
8
-
7
-
7

 

 

PLATO

DROPS IDEAS IDEAS DROPS

 

-
DROPIDES
-
-
-
4
DROP
53
26
8
4
IDES
37
19
1
8
DROPIDES
90
45
9
-
-
9+0
4+5
-
8
DROPIDES
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
DROPIDES
-
-
-
1
D
4
4
4
1
R
18
9
9
2
OP
31
13
4
1
I
9
9
9
2
DE
9
9
9
1
S
19
1
1
8
DROPIDES
90
45
9
-
-
9+0
4+5
-
8
DROPIDES
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ATHENIAN
-
-
-
2
AT
21
3
3
3
HEN
27
18
9
1
I
9
9
9
2
AN
15
6
6
8
ATHENIAN
72
36
27
-
-
7+2
3+6
2+7
8
ATHENIAN
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
I
9
9
9
4
LOVE
54
18
9
6
DIVINE
63
36
9
4
PLATO
64
19
1

 

 

TO

PLATO BELOVED BELOVED PLATO

TO

PLAY

DROPS IDEAS ASIDE PRODS

PRODUCE IDEAS IDEAS PRODUCE

 

IDEAS

I

DIE AS DIE

 

"1,2,3,4: Pythagoras and the Cosmology of Number ... to multiplicity via duality and trinity, is expressed even more graphically in ... Michell, The Dimensions of Paradise: The Proportions and Symbolic Numbers of ... vedicmaths.org/Free Resources/Articles/1234_pythagoras.asp - Cached

Free Resources
1,2,3,4: PYTHAGORAS

1,2,3,4: PYTHAGORAS AND THE COSMOLOGY OF NUMBER

At the heart of vedic mathematics lies a principle that underscores most, if not all, of the ancient wisdom traditions, the conveying of knowledge through cryptic, highly compressed expressions, open to multiple levels of interpretation. A prime example of this is the teaching of the Greek mathematician and sage Pythagoras. According to his ancient biographers:

"In the Pythagorean school, knowledge was transmitted symbolically, through the use of cryptic statements and riddles, in which a small number of words was pregnant with multiple levels of interpretation. Students were required to find meaning in these enigmatic lessons, sometimes through questioning and dialogue, sometimes by meditating upon their many possible meanings." (1)

If this was true of Pythagorean teachings, it was even more significant in more ancient schools of knowledge; it was, after all, at these schools, in Egypt, Babylon, and elsewhere, that Pythagoras gained his knowledge. In the case of the Indian tradition, both in Vedic times and later in the Hindu and Buddhist periods, the term most commonly encountered for this kind of cryptic literature was the sutra or collection of sutras. While this is often translated as "aphorism," or "formula," the word comes from the Sanskrit root for "thread," a usage that persists in the modern word "suture." As doctors use sutures to sow us up after surgery, the ancient sutras tie together our knowledge and integrate our awareness. There is no better example than the teachings contained in Patanjali's Yoga Sutras whose terse expressions contain instructions for the development of higher states of consciousness. Similarly, all the principles of vedic mathematics are encapsulated in sixteen sutras, which, along with thirteen sub-sutras, provide the basis for all the operations described in "The Cosmic Computer" (2).
If vedic mathematics can be counted as part of vedic literature, its ultimate source is the Rg Veda. This is certainly not concise, consisting of over 10,000 verses, but, as His Holiness Maharishi Mahesh Yogi has explained, it has a unique structure in which the essence of the whole text is essentially contained in one highly compressed expression--its first word. "It is the purpose of all ciphers to invest a few signs with much meaning," Carlo Suarès tells us. "In the severity of its beginning, in its first chapter, in its first sequence of letter numbers, is the seed, and in the seed is the whole." (3)
Suarès is referring to the beginning of Genesis, in which the process of creation is described, using the symbolism of gematria, in which each letter is given a numerical value. (4) According to Maharishi, the Rg Veda also sets forth a cosmogony in its first word-- Agni, but using a purely linguistic symbolism based on the physiology of speech. The first letter, or sound, AAAAAA…, pronounced with the mouth and throat fully open, and thus with a fully open sound, represents the fullness of the unmanifest, unbounded Brahman. But the letter G, a full glottal stop, introduces the first boundary on the full openness of the sound AAAAAA…. As the wave value of a sub-atomic particle collapses onto a point value when observed, so the unity, or samhita, value of Brahman collapses onto a point and becomes the triadic value of rishi, devata and chhandas, observer, process of observing, and object of observation. From here the process of manifestation begins. As the full stream of manifestation emerges, it leads on to the fullness of creation, and this is represented by the syllable NI, the same name given to the leading tone in Indian music (Sa, Re, Ga, Me Pa, Dha, Ni.....). The details of the process, and the content of manifestation and evolution, are unfolded through the rest of the verses of Rg Veda and commented upon by the rest of Vedic literature, including vedic mathematics.
Unity, duality, diversity, wholeness. These are the mechanics of creation described in different symbolic formulations in different knowledge traditions. To find it in purely mathematical or numerical form we return to the Pythagorean tradition, and its most concise expression comes from his successor Plato. Considered the most Pythagorean of Platonic dialogues, the Timaeus begins with a question by Socrates: "One, two, three ? but where, my dear Timaeus, is the fourth of my guests of yesterday who were to entertain me today?" (5) Commentators usually ignore this statement, but, as we have seen, in ancient literature every expression is "pregnant with multiple levels of meaning." This is particularly true when dealing with numbers.

"He [Pythagoras] held that the ultimate substances of all things, material and immaterial, were numbers, which had two distinct and complimentary aspects. On the one hand, they had a spatial and dynamic existence, and, on the other, they were fundamental formulating principles which were purely abstract. Thus, for example, the monad was understood by the Pythagoreans both as the number one, which had physical properties that could be manipulated in nature, and as an idea, which embodied the original unity at the source of all creation." (6)

The fundamental formulating principles in the universe are those values of unity, duality, diversity and wholeness we have already encountered. In Pythagorean thought these principles are clearly expressed in the first four numbers. Furthermore, this symbolism can be interpreted in terms of the Quadrivium, the four Pythagorean mathematical disciplines: arithmetic, music, geometry and astronomy.
Arithmetic was seen as the study of the abstract essence of things. Thus each number had a cosmological, as well as mathematical, significance. The monad, manifest as the number one, denotes the primordial unity at the basis of creation. The transition from one to two, from the monad to the dyad, represents the first step in the process of creation--unity polarizing within itself becomes duality. Three, the triad, is the first true number. One contains the seed, and two introduces potential. Three brings number into being, causing the potential contained within the monad to manifest into its true expression, the world of plurality and multitude.
If one and two initiate creation, three and four complete the process. Therefore, the tetrad, four, represents completion. Everything in the universe, both natural and numerical, is completed in the progression from one to four as 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 = 10, which brings us to the decad, also known to the Pythagoreans as the tetraktys, and representing their most sacred symbol. The same sequence, from unity to multiplicity via duality and trinity, is expressed even more graphically in the simplest and most basic musical relationships, those expressed through the numbers 1,2,3,4. The simplest and most fundamental musical relationship is the octave, discovered by Pythagoras to be the 1:2 relationship, and by Joseph Saveur (1653-1716) many centuries later, to be the first relationship in the harmonic overtone series. The experience of the octave is of two notes that are the same and yet different, and these values, sameness and difference are the fundamental substances used by the Demiurge to create the World-Soul in the Timaeus. Further, the octave provides the boundary conditions within which the musical universes contained within scales are formed, the values of Do in Do, Re, Mi, Fa, So, La, Ti, Do. Of these intervals, the central ones are those found to be next in the overtone series, 2:3, known as the fifth and 3:4 known as the fourth. These values are found in the first four harmonics of the overtone series, first 1:2 (octave), then 2:3 (fifth) then 3:4 (fourth) recapitulating the octave at the next power of two. In four simple sounds the whole process of unity, duality, multiplicity and wholeness is presented to the awareness.
In subsequent centuries, the science of geometry was developed into a sacred form in which the same process is represented by the circle (unity), contrasted with the square (diversity), and reconciled in the squaring of the circle, in alchemical practice, and the development of the mandala in Eastern art and architecture. "The object of sacred geometry being to depict that fusion of opposites, the squared circle is therefore its first symbol. Temples and cosmological cities throughout antiquity were founded on its proportions." (7) For Pythagoras, the symbolism of wholeness (kosmos) and order (harmonia) extended beyond mathematical to astrological phenomena. A theoretical planet called the counter-earth was posited to bring the number of heavenly bodies in the Pythagorean firmament to ten, the perfect number, the number of the tetraktys. And over time, an association between planets and musical notes was developed and elaborated into the famous "music of the spheres," a beautiful image of the kosmos as a divine harmony.
Having seen its range of implications, it could almost be stated that the sequence 1,2,3,4 sums up, in a compressed symbolism, the whole range of Pythagoreanism. But if we delve deeper into Platonic thought, a further dimension is revealed. In one of his most potent allegories, known as the "Divided Line," Plato sets out his theories of ontology and epistemology, and again it is done in terms of the number four. In this analogy, Plato makes a distinction between the outer realm of the world, illuminated by the sun and the inner realm of the mind, illuminated by the Good. The Divided Line passage divides each of these realms into two further sections. Plato also deals with the state of mind in which the resultant four realms are apprehended, resulting in the following scheme:

Level Object Faculty Type of Knowledge

IV Forms dialectic transcendental cognition } internal III mathematics thinking, scientific understanding } world Etc. reasoning

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

II physical sense common-sense belief } external objects perception } world I shadows illusory illusion (8) perception

It can be seen from this scheme that within the subjective realm of the mind, Plato posits a level of knowledge higher than that which deals with mathematical objects through the processes of thinking and reasoning. This is the level of the forms and it is reached, Plato tells us, through the use of the "second phase" of the dialectic, a technique that, according to Jonathan Shear is similar to the practice of jñana yoga. (9) This again reflects the Pythagorean approach to mathematics, one that must, on some level at least, apply to vedic maths also:

"For Pythagoras, mathematics served as a bridge between the visible and invisible worlds. He pursued the discipline of mathematics not only as a way of understanding and manipulating nature, but also as a means of turning the mind away from the physical world, which he held to be transitory and unreal, and leading it to the contemplation of eternal and truly existing things that never vary. He taught his students that by focusing on the elements of mathematics, they could calm and purify the mind, and ultimately, through disciplined effort, experience true happiness." (10)

Notes:

(1) John Strohmeier and Peter Westbrook. Divine Harmony: The Life and Teachings of Pythagoras. (Berkeley, CA: Berkeley Hills Books, 1999), p. 54.
(2) Williams and Gaskell, The Cosmic Computer (Inspiration Books, 1997.
(3) Carlo Suarès The Cipher of Genesis (York Beach, Maine: Samuel Weiser, Inc., 1992), p. 72.
(4) For more information on gematria see John Michell, The New View Over Atlantis (London: Thames & Hudson Ltd., 1983) and Gordon Strachan, Jesus the Master Builder: Druid Mysteries and the Dawn of Christianity. (Edinburgh: Floris Books, 1998).
(5) Plato, Timaeus, 17a.
(6) Strohmeier & Westbrook (1999), p. 66.
(7) John Michell, The Dimensions of Paradise: The Proportions and Symbolic Numbers of Ancient Cosmology (San Francisco: Harper & Row, 1988), pp. 66-67.
(8) Jonathan Shear, The Inner Dimension: Philosophy and the Experience of Consciousness (New York: Peter Lang, 1990), p. 12, n2.
(9) It is interesting note that the Greek word harmonia has a similar etymology to the Sanskrit yoga, viz. a joining together of opposite values.
(10) Strohmeier & Westbrook (1999), p. 66"

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
6
COSMOS
84
21
3
9
Add to Reduce
117
36
9
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+1+7
3+6
-
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

-
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
6
1
-
6
1
+
=
22
2+2
=
4
=
4
-
4
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
15
19
-
15
19
+
=
76
7+6
=
13
1+3
4
-
4
-
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
3
-
-
4
-
-
+
=
14
1+4
=
5
1+0
5
-
5
-
-
20
-
5
-
3
-
-
13
-
-
+
=
41
4+1
=
5
=
5
-
5
-
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
20
8
5
-
3
15
19
13
15
19
+
=
117
1+1+7
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
2
8
5
-
3
6
1
4
6
1
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
1+0
9
-
9
-
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
=
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
1
=
5
=
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
2
=
12
1+2
3
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
=
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
-
-
16
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
29
-
-
9
-
36
-
27
1+6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+9
-
-
-
-
3+6
-
2+7
7
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
11
-
-
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
2
8
5
-
3
6
1
4
6
1
-
-
1+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
2
-
-
9
-
9
-
9

 

 

9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
6
1
-
6
1
+
=
22
2+2
=
4
=
4
-
4
-
-
8
-
-
-
15
19
-
15
19
+
=
76
7+6
=
13
1+3
4
-
4
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
3
-
-
4
-
-
+
=
14
1+4
=
5
1+0
5
-
5
-
20
-
5
-
3
-
-
13
-
-
+
=
41
4+1
=
5
=
5
-
5
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
20
8
5
-
3
15
19
13
15
19
+
=
117
1+1+7
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
2
8
5
-
3
6
1
4
6
1
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
1+0
9
-
9
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
=
2
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
--
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
1
=
5
=
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
2
=
12
1+2
3
--
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
=
8
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
29
-
-
9
-
36
-
27
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+9
-
-
-
-
3+6
-
2+7
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
11
-
-
9
-
9
-
9
-
2
8
5
-
3
6
1
4
6
1
-
-
1+1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
T
H
E
-
C
O
S
M
O
S
-
-
2
-
-
9
-
9
-
9

 

 

-
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
1
+
=
7
-
=
7
=
7
-
-
-
-
15
-
19
+
=
34
3+4
=
7
=
7
-
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
1
2
-
4
-
+
=
7
-
=
7
=
7
-
-
1
20
-
13
-
+
=
34
3+4
=
7
=
7
-
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
1
20
15
13
19
+
=
68
6+8
=
14
1+4
5
-
-
1
2
6
4
1
+
=
14
1+4
=
5
=
5
-
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
32
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
13
-
-
5
-
14
3+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+4
5
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
4
-
-
5
-
5
-
-
1
2
6
4
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
4
-
-
5
-
5

 

 

5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
1
+
=
7
-
=
7
=
7
-
-
-
15
-
19
+
=
34
3+4
=
7
=
7
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
1
2
-
4
-
+
=
7
-
=
7
=
7
-
1
20
-
13
-
+
=
34
3+4
=
7
=
7
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
1
20
15
13
19
+
=
68
6+8
=
14
1+4
5
-
1
2
6
4
1
+
=
14
1+4
=
5
=
5
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
13
-
-
5
-
14
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+4
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
4
-
-
5
-
5
-
1
2
6
4
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
A
T
O
M
S
-
-
4
-
-
5
-
5

 

 

-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
+
=
6
-
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
15
-
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
1
2
-
4
+
=
7
-
=
7
=
7
-
-
1
20
-
13
+
=
34
3+4
=
7
=
7
-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
1
20
15
13
+
=
49
4+9
=
13
1+3
4
-
-
1
2
6
4
+
=
13
1+3
=
4
=
4
-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
32
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
13
-
-
4
-
13
3+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+3
5
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
4
-
-
1
2
6
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
4

 

 

-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
+
=
6
-
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
15
-
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
1
2
-
4
+
=
7
-
=
7
=
7
-
-
1
20
-
13
+
=
34
3+4
=
7
=
7
-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
1
20
15
13
+
=
49
4+9
=
13
1+3
4
-
-
1
2
6
4
+
=
13
1+3
=
4
=
4
-
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
32
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
13
-
-
4
-
13
3+2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+3
-
-
-
-
1+3
5
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
4
-
-
1
2
6
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
4
A
T
O
M
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
4

 

THE ATOM THE

 

THE ATUM THE

 

6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
6
A
T
U
M
-T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
10
-
-
4
-
10
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
Q
1+0
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
1
-
-
4
-
2

 

 

THE HERMETICA

THE LOST WISDOM OF THE PHARAOHS

Timothy Freke & Peter Gandy

To the Memory of Giordano Bruno 1548 - 1600

Mundus Nihil Pulcherrimum

The World is a Beautiful Nothing

Page 23

"Although we have used the familiar term 'God' in the explanatory notes which accompany each chapter, we have avoided this term in the text itself. Instead we have used 'Atum - one of the ancient Egyptian names for the Supreme One God."

 

Page 45

The Being of Atum

"Atum is Primal Mind."

 

Page 45

The Being of Atum

Give me your whole awareness, and concentrate your thoughts, for Knowledge of Atum's Being requires deep insight, which comes only as a gift of grace.

It is like a plunging torrent of water whose swiftness outstrips any man who strives to follow it, leaving behind not only the hearer, but even the teacher himself.

To conceive of Atum is difficult.

To define him is impossible.

The imperfect and impermanent cannot easily apprehend the eternally perfected.

Atum is whole and conconstant.

In himself he is motionless, yet he is self-moving.

He is immaculate, incorruptible and ever-lasting.

He is the Supreme Absolute Reality. He is filled with ideas which are imperceptible to the senses, and with all-embracing Knowledge.

Atum is Primal Mind.

Page 46

He is too great to be called by the name 'Atum'. He is hidden, yet obvious everywhere.

His Being is known through thought alone, yet we see his form before our eyes.

He is bodiless, yet embodied in everything. There is nothing which he is not. He has no name, because all names are his name. He is the unity in all things, so we must know him by all names and call everything 'Atum'.

He is the root and source of all. Everything has a source, except this source itself, which springs from nothing.

Atum is complete like the number one, which remains itself whether multiplied or divided, and yet generates all numbers.

Atum is the Whole which contains everything. He is One, not two.

He is All, not many.

The All is not many separate things, but the Oneness that subsumes the parts.

The All and the One are identical.

You think that things are many when you view them as separate, but when you see they all hang on the One, /Page 47/ and flow from the One, you will realise they are united­linked together, and connected by a chain of Being from the highest to the lowest, all subject to the will of Atum.

The Cosmos is one as the sun is one, the moon is one and the Earth is one.

Do you think there are many Gods? That's absurd - God is one.

Atum alone is the Creator of all that is immortal, and all that is mutable.

If that seems incredible, just consider yourself. You see, speak, hear, touch, taste, walk, think and breathe.

It is not a different you who does these various things, but one being who does them all.

To understand how Atum makes all things, consider a farmer sowing seeds; here wheat - there barley,
now planting a vine - then an apple tree.

Just as the same man plants all these seeds, so Atum sows immortality in heaven and change on Earth.

Throughout the Cosmos he disseminates Life and movement­the two great elements that comprise Atum and his creation, and so everything that is.

Page 48

Atum is called 'Father' because he begets all things, and, from his example, the wise hold begetting children the most sacred pursuit of human life. Atum works with Nature, within the laws of Necessity, causing extinction and renewal, constantly creating creation to display his wisdom.

Yet, the things that the eye can see are mere phantoms and illusions.

Only those things invisible to the eye are real. Above all are the ideas of Beauty and Goodness.

Just as the eye cannot see the Being of Atum, so it cannot see these great ideas.

They are attributes of Atum alone, and are inseparable from him.

They are so perfectly without blemish that Atum himself is in love with them.

There is nothing which Atum lacks, so nothing that he desires.

There is nothing that Atum can lose, so nothing can cause him grief. Atum is everything.

Atum makes everything, and everything is a part of Atum.

Atum, therefore, makes himself.

This is Atum's glory - he is all-creative, and this creating is his very Being.

It is impossible for him ever to stop creating­for Atum can never cease to be.

Page 49

Atum is everywhere.

Mind cannot be enclosed, because everything exists within Mind.

Nothing is so quick and powerful.

Just look at your own experience. Imagine yourself in any foreign land, and quick as your intention you will be there!

Think of the ocean - and there you are.

You have not moved as things move, but you have travelled, nevertheless.

Fly up into the heavens - you won't need wings!

Nothing can obstruct you - not the burning heat of the sun, or the swirling planets.

Pass on to the limits of creation. Do you want to break out beyond the boundaries of the Cosmos?

For your mind, even that is possible.

Can you sense what power you possess? If you can do all this, then what about your Creator?

Try and understand that Atum is Mind.

This is how he contains the Cosmos. All things are thoughts which the Creator thinks."

 

 

-
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
1
-
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
1
-
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
1
-
6
A
T
U
M
-T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
FIVE
5
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
SIX
6
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
7
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
9
-
-
-
35
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
10
-
-
4
-
10
3+5
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
Q
1+0
8
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
1
-
-
4
-
2

 

 

6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
1
20
21
13
+
=
55
5+5
=
10
1+0
1
-
1
2
3
4
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
6
A
T
U
M
-T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
10
-
-
4
-
10
-
1
2
3
4
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
Q
1+0
6
A
T
U
M
-
-
1
-
-
4
-
2

 

 

A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
T
20
2
2
-
-
-
-
-
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
-
-
M
13
4
4
A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
55
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
5+5
1+0
1+0
A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
10
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
1
1
1

 

 

 

 

A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
A
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
T
20
2
2
-
-
-
-
-
U
21
3
3
-
-
-
-
-
M
13
4
4
A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
55
10
10
-
-
-
-
-
-
5+5
1+0
1+0
A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
10
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
A
=
1
-
4
ATUM
1
1
1

S
=
1
-
6
SOPHIA
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
S
19
10
1
-
-
-
-
-
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
P
16
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
H
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
I
9
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
A
1
1
1
S
=
1
-
6
SOPHIA
68
41
14
-
-
-
-
-
-
6+8
4+1
1+4
S
=
1
-
6
SOPHIA
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
-
S
=
1
-
6
SOPHIA
5
5
5

 

 

CIVILIZATION, SCIENCE AND RELIGION

A. D. RITCHIE 1945

THE ART OF THINKING

Page 38

"In the sphere of the natural sciences and of mathematics there have been endless disputes as to how much the Greeks borrowed from their neighbours, and the disputes are likely to continue, for the evidence is scanty and unreliable. It is safe to assume that the Greeks (noted then as now for commercial enterprise) took all they could get. Their own writers say as much, for they attribute the origin of very many useful inventions to other peoples. But this one thing, the scientific outlook and method, was not there to take; they had to invent it themselves. It is well to be clear on this point, for European civilization rests on three legs. They are Greek science, Jewish religion and Roman law. / Page 39 / Roman law may well be considered the Roman development of Greek scientific method. I will therefore deal with two examples in some little detail. These are taken from the sphere of mathematics and astronomy, for it was in these two sciences that the Greeks had their most outstanding success, doing about as much as could possibly be done under the conditions of their day and laying the foundations on which all subsequent work has been based.

The Egyptians knew of many useful methods of -geo- metrical calculation, for finding the area of a field, the volume of a barrel and so on. The Babylonians and earlier Mesopotamians had made accurate observations of sun, moon and stars over long periods and developed ingenious methods for calculating their future positions in the sky. In these arts of calculation these people had nothing to learn from the Greeks; it was the other way about. But there is no evidence that they ever dreamt of turning the art of calculation into the science of mathematics. Solving particular problems, however ingeniously, is not necessarily science any more than is playing chess (though all chess problems are geometrical) or keeping accounts (though all money reckoning is arithmetical). Mathematical science in the proper sense of the word attains its end by two means : (1) generalizing as far as is possible all problems and their solutions, so that one solution solves any number of particular cases; (2) finding proofs that solutions are correct as opposed to finding solutions which might be right by chance, not by necessity. The method used is the method of discussion in its specifically mathematical form.

The Egyptians could set out a right-angle on the ground, for building or for land surveying, by means of a cord knotted at intervals of 3, 4 and 5 units of length. They adjusted three pegs to make a triangle with the knots at the pegs when the cord was stretched tight round them. The Greeks, seeing this trick, generalized the problem and looked for a proof of the solution. The final result, after two centuries of effort, is the First Book of Euclid's Elements, leading up to Proposition 47that the square on the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle equals the sum of / Page 40 / the squares on the other sides, and that this must be so, granted the assumptions made at the beginning. (The proposition is further generalized in, Euclid VI, 31.) In this way a technical dodge of the land surveyor, depending upon the fact that 32+42= 52, was turned into science.

Page 38 Notes

1 Thucydides IV, 104—V, 26.
2 Hippocrates, Vol. ii, pp. 138 seq. Loeb Classical Library.

 

 

3
ONE
34
16
7
4
ZERO
64
28
1
5
EIGHT
49
31
4
12
First Total
147
75
12
1+2
Add to Reduce
1+4+7
7+5
1+2
3
Second Total
12
12
3
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+2
1+2
-
3
Essence of Number
3
3
3

 

 

9
EIGHTY ONE
108
54
9

 

 

-
EIGHTY ONE
-
-
-
1
E
5
5
5
1
I
9
9
9
2
G+H
15
15
6
2
T+Y
45
9
9
3
ONE
34
16
7
9
EIGHTY ONE
108
54
36
-
-
1+0+8
5+4
3+6
9
EIGHTY ONE
9
9
9

 

 

-
EIGHTY ONE
-
-
-
7
EIGHTYO
89
44
9
2
N+E
19
10
1
9
EIGHTY ONE
108
54
36
-
-
1+0+8
5+4
3+6
9
EIGHTY ONE
9
9
9

 

 

8
+
6
EIGHTY
74
38
2
1
+
3
ONE
34
16
7
9
-
9
Add to Reduce
108
54
9
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0+8
5+4
-
9
+
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

-
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
8
-
-
+
6
5
-
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
-
-
9
-
8
-
-
-
15
14
-
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
-
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
2
7
+
-
-
5
+
=
26
2+6
=
8
=
8
=
8
-
-
5
-
7
-
20
25
+
-
-
5
+
=
62
6+2
=
8
=
8
=
8
-
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
9
7
8
20
25
+
15
14
5
+
=
108
1+0+8
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
5
9
7
8
2
7
+
6
5
5
+
=
54
5+4
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
-
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
+
-
-
-
+
=
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
+
-
5
5
+
=
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
6
-
-
+
=
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
7
+
-
-
-
+
=
7
occurs
x
2
=
14
1+4
5
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
+
-
-
-
+
=
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
=
8
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
=
9
8
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
+
+
37
-
-
9
-
54
-
36
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
+
-
5
5
-
-
3+7
-
-
-
-
5+4
-
3+6
8
-
E
I
G
H
T
Y
-
O
N
E
-
-
10
-
-
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
-
9
7
8
2
7
+
6
5
5
+
+
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
+
+
2
-
-
9
-
9
-
9

 

 

9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
8
-
-
+
6
5
-
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
-
9
-
8
-
-
-
15
14
-
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
-
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
7
-
2
7
+
-
-
5
+
=
26
2+6
=
8
=
8
=
8
-
5
-
7
-
20
25
+
-
-
5
+
=
62
6+2
=
8
=
8
=
8
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
5
9
7
8
20
25
+
15
14
5
+
=
108
1+0+8
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
5
9
7
8
2
7
+
6
5
5
+
=
54
5+4
=
9
=
9
=
9
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
-
O
N
E
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
-
-
-
-
2
-
+
-
-
-
+
=
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
+
5
-
-
-
-
-
+
-
5
5
+
=
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
+
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
6
-
-
+
=
6
occurs
x
1
=
6
=
6
+
-
-
7
-
-
7
+
-
-
-
+
=
7
occurs
x
2
=
14
1+4
5
+
-
-
-
8
-
-
+
-
-
-
+
=
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
=
8
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
=
9
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
+
+
37
-
-
9
-
54
-
36
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
+
-
5
5
-
-
3+7
-
-
-
-
5+4
-
3+6
-
E
I
G
H
T
Y
-
O
N
E
-
-
10
-
-
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
9
7
8
2
7
+
6
5
5
+
+
1+0
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
E
I
G
H
T
Y
+
O
N
E
+
+
2
-
-
9
-
9
-
9

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
ONE TWO SIX
-
-
-
1
-
O
=
6
-
3
ONE
34
16
7
2
-
T
=
2
-
3
TWO
58
13
4
6
-
S
=
1
-
3
SIX
52
16
7
9
-
-
-
9
-
9
ONE TWO SIX
144
45
18
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1+4+4
4+5
1+8
9
-
-
-
9
-
9
ONE TWO SIX
9
9
9

 

 

-
9
O
N
E
-
T
W
O
-
S
I
X
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
5
-
-
-
-
6
-
1
9
6
+
=
33
3+3
=
6
-
6
-
6
-
-
15
14
-
-
-
-
15
-
19
9
24
+
=
96
9+6
=
15
1+5
6
-
6
-
9
O
N
E
-
T
W
O
-
S
I
X
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
2
5
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
12
1+2
=
3
-
3
-
3
-
-
-
-
5
-
20
23
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
48
4+8
=
12
1+2
3
-
4
-
9
O
N
E
-
T
W
O
-
S
I
X
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
14
5
-
20
23
15
-
19
9
24
+
=
144
1+4+4
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
-
6
5
5
-
2
5
6
-
1
9
6
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
-
9
-
9
-
9
O
N
E
-
T
W
O
-
S
I
X
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
-
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
3
=
15
1+5
6
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
6
-
-
6
occurs
x
3
=
18
1+8
9
7
-
-