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Evokation
 
 
Index
 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
5
GRAND
44
26
8
5
CROSS
74
20
2
13
Add to Reduce
151
61
16
1+3
Reduce to Deduce
1+5+1
6+1
1+6
4
Essence of Number
7
7
7

 

 

5
THE SOLAR SYSTEM
-
-
-
3
THE
33
15
6
5
SOLAR
65
29
2
6
SYSTEM
101
38
2
14
THE SOLAR SYSTEM
199
82
10
1+4
-
1+9+9
8+2
1+0
5
THE SOLAR SYSTEM
19
10
1
-
-
1+9
1+0
-
5
THE SOLAR SYSTEM
10
10
1
-
-
1+0
-
-
5
THE SOLAR SYSTEM
1
1
1

 

 

3
SUN
54
9
9
7
MERCURY
103
40
4
5
VENUS
81
18
9
5
EARTH
52
25
7
4
MOON
57
21
3
4
MARS
51
15
6
7
JUPITER
99
36
9
6
SATURN
93
21
3
6
URANUS
94
22
4
7
NEPTUNE
95
32
5
5
PLUTO
84
21
3
59
First Total
863
260
62
5+9
Add to Reduce
8+6+3
2+6
6+2
16
Second Total
17
8
8
1+6
Reduce to Deduce
1+7
-
-
7
Essence of Number
8
8
8

 

 

3
SUN
54
9
9
5
EARTH
52
25
7
4
MOON
57
21
3
12
First Total
163
55
19
1+2
Add to Reduce
1+6+3
5+5
6+2
3
Second Total
10
10
10
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
1+0
3
Essence of Number
7
7
7

 

 

ADVENT 197

http://www.national-lottery.co.uk

"DRAW 973 WED 20 APRIL 05"

13, 26, 27, 38 41, 43, bonus ball 35

 

5
URIMM
61
25
7
7
THUMMIM
97
34
7

 

 

GOD

Alexander Waugh

Page 162

Einstein's blunder. - When Einstein tried to refute quantum physics with his now famous dictum 'God does not play dice' He revealed his ignorance of scripture, for God does indeed play dice in the form of a game called urim and thummim. These flat stone dice are mentioned many times in the Hebrew Bible. Although urim and thummim actually belonged to God (Ps.-Philo 47:2) they were jealously guarded by the high priest either in his ephod (an oracular pouch) or in a pocket by his chest. The exact manner in which urim and thummim was played has been lost to the mysteries of time, but it is thought they provided the same function as a coin when it is flipped for heads or tails. When Saul wished to establish a question of blame he set up the urim and thummim asking: '"Lord God of Israel, if fault lies-with me or my son Jonathan give urim: if the fault lies with your people Israel, give thummim." Jonathan and Saul were indicated and the people went free. Saul then said: "Cast the lot between me and Jonathan," and Jonathan was indicated' (1 Sam. 14:41-2).
After a while it dawned on the people of Israel that urim and thummim did not always give reliable results (Ps.-Philo 47:2) and so God ceased to be addressed through this medium, probably as early as the seventh century BCE. The whole matter might well have been forgotten had it not been for God lending his urim and thummim nearly two thousand years later to Joseph Smith in order to help the prophet interpret the 'revised Egyptian' squiggles of the Book of Mormon. Smith had to return them to the angel, Moroni, and regrettably failed to make accurate drawings before handing them back. However, in a /Page 163/ bewildering twist, God later informed Smith (2 April 1843) that he (God) was now living inside a giant urim and thummim.
The place where I reside [said God] is a great Urim and Thummim. This earth in its sanctified and immortal state, will be made like unto crystal and will be a Urim and Thummim to the inhabitants who dwell thereon, whereby all things pertaining to an inferior kingdom, or all kingdoms of a lower order, will be manifest to those who dwell on it; and this earth will be Christ's. Then the white stone mentioned in Revelation 2:17, will become a Urim and Thummim to each- individual who receives one, whereby things pertaining to a higher order of kingdoms will be made known. (Doctrine and Covenants, 130:8-10)

And Einstein thought that the cosmological constant was his 'biggest blunder'!

 

 

20
COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT
-
-
-
-
C+O+S+M+O+L+O+G
99
36
9
-
I
9
9
9
-
C+A+L
16
7
7
-
C+O
18
9
9
-
N+S+T+A
54
9
9
-
N+T
34
7
7
20
COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT
230
77
50
2+0
-
2+3+0
7+7
5+0
-
5
14
5
-
-
-
1+4
-
2
COSMOLOGICAL CONSTANT
5
5
5

 

 

20
C
O
S
M
O
L
O
G
I
C
A
L
-
C
O
N
S
T
A
N
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
1
-
6
-
6
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
6
5
1
-
-
5
-
+
=
45
4+5
=
9
-
-
9
--
-
15
19
-
15
-
15
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
15
14
19
-
-
14
-
+
=
135
1+3+5
=
9
-
-
9
20
C
O
S
M
O
L
O
G
I
C
A
L
-
C
O
N
S
T
A
N
T
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
15
19
13
15
12
15
7
9
3
1
12
-
3
15
14
19
20
1
14
20
+
=
230
2+3+0
=
5
-
-
5-
-
3
6
1
4
6
3
6
7
9
3
1
3
-
3
6
5
1
2
1
5
2
+
=
77
7+7
=
14
1+4
=
5
-
 
1
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
1
-
-
+
=
4
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
2
+
=
4
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
3
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
3
-
3
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
4
-
-
4
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
5
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
-
-
1
-
-
6
-
-
6
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
24
2+4
=
6
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
7
-
-
7
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
=
9
-
-
9
-
-
9
20
C
O
S
M
O
L
O
G
I
C
A
L
-
C
O
N
S
T
A
N
T
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-

 

 

1
occurs
x
4
=
4
-
-
4
2
occurs
x
2
=
4
-
-
4
3
occurs
x
5
=
15
1+5
=
6
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
-
-
4
5
occurs
x
2
=
10
1+0
=
1
6
occurs
x
4
=
24
2+4
=
6
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
-
-
7
8
               
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
-
-
9
37
-
-
20
-
77
-
-
41
3+7
-
-
2+0
-
7+7
-
-
4+1
10
-
-
2
-
14
-
-
5
1+0
-
-
-
-
1+4
-
-
-
1
-
-
2
-
5
-
-
5

 

HERO WITH A THOUSAND FACES

Joseph Campbell 1949

'I)IE~!ect-<>f thesuccessful,adventure of the hero is the unlod~ing
.and reiease again .oftlie flow ~fdi£eJIito the body of the world. Themirack.ofthis flow;;maybe.representedjn~physical terms as
c. a dr<itJ,latiort, of" f{)od ~ubstance, dynamically as a streaming of~ energy,"or spiritually as "a manifestation of grace. Such varieties of im~ge alternate easilY~Tepresenting,thre~ degrees oJcondensa­
- 1ion pf t!1e op.e life force. Ancabundan1;~harvest is the'signo£ God's
grace;.God's grace is the tood of rl!eJoph the lightning boIl; is the
c"~arb1~ger of fertilizing rain, aqd at the same time th~ manifesta­
tion of th~ reAeased energy of God. Grace, food substanfe, el1ergy: ~~es~~P9ur ipto,;ct~e livjng woi1d~ and wherever they 'Cf~flj life de.
composes~iIlto death. C' ",c ~
"The torrent pours.£rom an invisible source, the point of entry being the center of the symbolic circLe of the unverse, the Im/C45Quoted by Epiphanius, Adversus haereses, xxvi, 3­
AD

41

HERO WITH A THOUSAND FACES

Joseph Campbell 1949

THE WORLD NAVEL

Page 40/41

"The torrent pours.£rom an invisible source, the point of entry being the center of the symbolic circle of the unverse, the Im/movable Spot of the Buddha legend,46 around which the ,world may be said to revolve. Beneath this spot is the earth-supporting head of the cosmic serpent, the dragon, symbolical of the waters of the abyss, which are the divi!le life-creative energy and sub­stance of the demiurge, the world-generative aspect of immortal being.47 The tree of life, i.e., the universe itself, grows from this point. It is rooted in the supporting darkness; the golden sun bird perches on its peak; a spring, the inexhaustible well, bubbles at its foot. Or the figure may be that of a cosmic mountain, with the city of the gods, like a lotus of light, upon its summit, and-in its hollow the cities of the demons, illuminated by precious stones. Again, the figure may be that of the cosmic man or woman (for example the Buddha himself, or the dancing Hindu goddess Kali) seated or standing on this spot, or even fixed to the tree (Attis, Jesus, Wotan); for the hero as the incarnation of God is himself the navel of the world, the umbilical point through which the energies of eternity break into time. Thus the World Navel is the symbol of the continuous creation: the mystery of the main­tenance of the world through that continuous miracle of vivification which wells within all things.
Among the Pawnees of northern Kansas and southern N e­braska, the priest, during the ceremonial of the Hako, draws a circle with his toe. "The circle represents a nest," such a priest is reported to have said, "and it is drawn by the toe because the eagle builds its nest with its claws. Although we are imitating the bird making its nest, there is another meaning to the action; we are thinking of Tirawa making the world for the people to live in. If you go on a high hill and look around, you will see the sky touch­ing the earth on every side, and within this circular enclosure the people live; So the circles we have made are not only nests, but they also represent the circle Tirawa-atius has made for the dwell­
46 Supra, p. 32. ­
47 This is the serpent that protected the Buddha, the fifth week after his
enlightenment. See supra, p. 33. .

 

 

SATURN IN TRANSIT

BOUNDARIES OF MIND BODY AND SOUL

Erin Sullivan

1990

Page 10

unique to his or her personal ,background and the ordeal unlike anyone else's. With the same transit that brings forth the monsters comes the solution to the problem and it, too, is specific to what each individual seems to need to face at that time of life. As we shall see, the duality of Saturn often poses the problem and the solution in the same shape.
Finally, notwithstanding the conflicting reports of the battles of the Giants and the Titans, and the problematic interpretations of the wars'; Kronos' conclusive fate was to retire, rather grace­fully considering the magnitude of his crimes and the circum­stances of his banishment, to the Islands of the Blessed w~ere, on the Elysian Fields, he ruled benignly over returned heroes and other chthonian inhabitants. Saturn, born of earth, returned to earth.
The Mythic Kronos aild the Roman Saturn
The greatest difficulty we have in understanding myth today is our tendency to think of sequence or of duration in chronological time, which is what Mircea Eliade called 'profane time' because it exists in the realm of everyday life. The origins of myth lie in oral tradition (muthos), songs of adventures which took place in 'sacred time', in an atemporal realm, not in a literate society which measures time in a linear fashion.lo Because of the mythopoeic mind, the voice of the collective as heard through the poets of this ancient oral tradition, it is difficult for us to differentiate between what happened, when and to whom; for in sacred time there is no chronology. Eliade demonstrates that all human action is repre­sentative of an ancient ritual from a distant past, primarily actions of gods, and that we re-enact these prototype gestures in imitation of the gods in all subsequent behaviour. This view adds a dimen­sion not only to astrology and planetary dynamics, but to our

THE EVOLUTION OF AN ARCHETYPE


11
modern lives also, insofar as it points to a sacred precedent. The horoscope is peopled by anCient gods, each with their individual nature. The relationship that each of these gods had with the others is enacted in the horoscope in a most astounding way. The actions ofthose gods seem uncannily like our own, even if not in detail - usually ours are not quite so dramatic; but they ,are identical in essence - they are archetypal experiences. Specifically, the anCient Greek Titan god, Kronos, has been one of the most durable of all the mythological images and symbols, sllrviving several cultural transitions and becoming assimilated into sub­sequent religions, philosophies and occult traditions as we shall see.
To begin with the marriage of heaven and earth: ~the union of Gaia and Ouranos - Earth and Sky - is paralleled by the marriage of their children Kronos and Rhea, and subsequently by Zeus and Hera. The archetypal mother and father' and the politics of such polarities in our own male-female relationships are analogous to the hieros gamos, the original, or sacred, marriage. Intrafamilial struggles become clearer when we see what gods did before us. Kronos' castration of his father is the sacred precedent for all father and son rites of maturation and separation, and the sub­sequent rejection of Kronos by his mother in preference for Rhea establishes an archetype for the necessary defection of the son from maternal rule. Saturn transits can sever one from the past as brutally as the infinite realm of Gaia and Ouranos was terminated. The seemingly paradoxical but entwined combination of fear of authority, the desire to overcome authority and the will to power, i.e. to become an authority, is embodied in the mythology and the archetype of Saturn.
The ambivalence of Saturn is better understood when we realize that he occupied concurrently two positions in the minds of the anCients: that of the benign, compassionate and liberal ruler of the Golden Age as well as the ruthless son who castrated his father and later, as a father himself, devoured his own children. A realized Saturn brings a peace of mind that cannot be paralleled, but an unacknowledged, unassimilated or projected Saturn can afflict an individual with chronic problems and power struggles. The covetous, callous ruler contrasts with the gentle monarch of

 

THE WISE WOUND

169
powerful .hypnotic' image indeed to which a woman by choice or training, may link her menstrual cycle. In addition modem work shows that the moon's light, or any other indirect night-time lighting at mid-cycle, may actually stimulate ovulation physiologically.
With these linked ideaS in mind, what evidence is there that these capacities have actually been used in the past, as they may be used in the future?
The name .Hera' means .Womb'. If, as has sometimes been said, .Hera' means 'Mistress' this is because she gives the laws, and the women's laws are the ways of the womb. .Thesmophoria', the great Greek women's fertility festival, means .Iaw-bearing'. These laws include las reglas, or the .way of all women', the menstrual rhythm. A reasonable derivation from Hesiod and Homer of the name 'Hera' is 'womb', and this interpretation is backed,by the fact that she is called panton genethla, 'origin of all things', which is the 'womb'. The great Goddess's name in most cultures in derivation means .womb' or .vulva': the Goddess is Genetrix. The womb gives birth, and it also menstruates.
'Astarte' or 'Ashtaroth' means 'womb', or 'that which issues from the womb'. 'Pallas Athena' means literally .Vulva-vulva'. The name of the Greek Goddess of childbirth is Eileithyia, and her name means .fluid of generation' which in this context is 'menses', which was thought to enter into the composition of the child and the milk.
The original home, or dwelling-place, was the womb of the woman, so cities may be called by the name of a goddess. Thus, the capital city of the ancient land of Og was called. Ashtaroth-Qamaim' which means .Womb of the Two Horns', since the human (and divine) womb is two-homed with its Fallopian tubes. It is the emblem of fertility and containment, and the sacred bucranium or"ox-head decorating Greek and Roman temples, was a womb-emblem. A locality is where you lie in childbed (Gk. lokhos) and produce the child and Jhe magical lochial blood of childbirth: the blood of the person's first place of arrival. The Queen is cwen or wife with the quim, which is a combe or cwm, the gune (woman) is a goddess when she#is gana and ;ani (woman) with a yoni, or cunt. Gens is wife, as in generation, or .great tribe'. This is all natural, as all human beings are born from a womb, and without this first .magic' there would be no consciousness and therefore no human religion, or anything else. So Hera's womb is literally panton genethla.1

Page 170

170
The Wise Wound
The Heraion, the temple of Hera, the cunt-place, was for centUries in Ancient Greece 'the sanctuary of the whole country, originally in the same way as the temple of Jerusalem, for instance, was a unique temple of Israel', says Carl Kerenyi. When you have an altar, you have to have a facing-partner: that is, an emblem of the diety whose rites are celebrated at this place. On the Christian altar this is a crucifix. A Poseidon altar would have the sea 'in its incalculable mobility'. An ahar of Helios might have the sun's ecliptic. The terrace of the Argive Heraioll was an immer.se cult stage for viewing the moon, and Hera herself was a single goddess in 'three phases'. Her myth in JakT times, as in Homer, is assGdated with Hera's 'sulks' but in the true cult sense this was a descent of Hera into the underworld, the low point (or, as we might say, PMT) being associated with the new moon. Hera is sometimes shown with a pomegranate, the red fruit full of seeds which associates her with the Queen of the Underworld, Persephone. Pausanias says the story of the pomegranate is 'rather secret'. These goddesses guided through the underworld. Prosymne is the new moon, and Prosymnos was Dionysos' guide to the underworld, as, according to Graves, Eurydice was the guide of Orpheus. Prosymne was Demeter's epithet, the earth-mother in her underworld aspect. The Goddess Prosymna was summoned in the name of the new moon when it lingered in the darkness. In Athens, Pallas Athena ('Vulva­vulva') was reborn with the new moon, just as Hera was reborn from a bath in which she had her virginity restored, in the same manner as the womb is restored after the menstruation for a fresh cycle, with a fresh womb-lining. There was a ceremony of the washing of Athena's 'laundry'. In the Hera cult there would similarly be a pwcession of 'freed' women after the purification of a wooden figure of the goddess, shortly after the new moon had appeared, following 'the low point of Hera's periodic being'.
It is possible that the original temple on the Acropolis at Athens belonged to such a cult. Hera was worshipped in her 'great part-secret, part-public cult. .. in her transformations according to the Moon's phases' and so was Athena. That is to say, that the Acropolis was dedicated to Vulva. This is as shocking as supposing that where St Paul's great dome now stands in London was originally the site of moon-worship, and that the name 'London' was originally 'Laun­don' in Celtic, or Moon-Town. There is however evidence for this also.2

 

Page 1 6 2
MYTHS TO LIVE BY
through which she is happily strolling is not of Heaven but H~ll. She is indignant. "I tell you, I know I am not in Hell," she insistS, "because I feel no pain." Well, if she likes (she is told), she can easily stroll on over the hill into Heaven. However, the strain of remaining there has been found intolerable (she is warned) .for those who are happy in Hell. There are a few-and they are mostly English-who nevertheless -remain, not because they are happy, but because they think they owe it to their position to be in Heaven. "An Englishman," states her informer, "thinks he is moral when he is only uncomfortable." And with that telling
Shavian quip, I am carried to my final reflections on this chapter's
theme. . .
For it was in the legend of the Holy Grail that the healing work was symbolized through which the world torn between honor and love, as represented in the Tristan legend, was to be cured of its irresolution. The intolerable spiritual disorder of the period was represented in this highly symbolic tale in the figure of a "waste land" -the same that T. S. Eliot in his poem of that name, pub­lished in 1922, adopted to characterize the condition of our own troubled time. Every natural impulse in that period of ecclesiasti­cal despotism was branded as corrupt, with the only recognized means of "redemption" vested in sacraments administered by au­thorities who were themselves indeed corrupt. People were forced to profess and live by beliefs they did not always actu~lly hold. The imposed moral order held precedence over the claims of both truth and love. The pains of Hell were illustrated on earth in the torture of adulteresses, heretics, and other villains, torn apart or set afire in publk squares. And all hope of anything better was pitched high aloft to that celestial estate of which Gottfried spoke with such scorn, where those who could bear neither grief nor de­sire were to be bathed in a bliss everlasting.
In the legend of the Grail, as rendered in the Parzival of Gottfried's very great contemporary and leading literary rival, Wolfram von Eschenbach, this devastation of Christendom is symbolically attributed to the awesome wounding of the young

Page 184 I 8 f
MYTH S TO L I "y E :B Y
as ChunKuo, "of the Warring States," the first ruler of a united empire, Shih Huang Ti "(22 1-"207 B.C.), gov~rried, according to his claim, by the mandate of Heaven, under Heaven's law. ,.
It is then liardly to be wondered if the,enthusiastic Hebrew <!u"­tho(of IsaiaI140--"55, who was a contemporary of Cyrus,ihe-Great and living witness of the Persian restoration-to Jerusalem of its people, gives evidence in his prophecies of the influence of Zo­roastrian ideas; for example, in the famous passages of Chapter 45: "Thus says the Lord to .his anointedlc tq,Cyru~ . . . 'I form light and create darkness, I make weal and create woe, -I am the Lord, who do all these things.' " It is in these chapter-s of the so­called Second or Deutero Isaiah that we find the earliest celeJ:>ra­tions of Yahweh not simply as the greatest and most powerful god among.,gods, but as the one God of the universe, in whom not only Jews but also the gentiles a,re to find salvation: "Turn to me and be saved, all the ends ~of the earth!" we read, for instance. "For I am God; and there is nb other" (Isaiah 45:22). Moreover, whereas the earlier idea of the Messiah of the pre-exilic prophets had been simply of an ideal king on- David's throne, "to uphold it," as in Isaiah 9:6-7;; "with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and for evermore"; in the post-exilic period, and pa;ticularly In the very late, apocalyptic writings of the Alexandrian age-as, f(jr instance, in the Book of Daniel ~7: I3-27-there is the notion qf one who, at the end>pf historic time, should be given, over "all peoples, nations, and l~hguages," "an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass a\Xay." And at that time, furtherm.ore, "Many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake1; some to ever­lasting life, and some to shame and everlasting co!ltempt" (Daniel
)2:2)." - ,-'ii
There can be no doubt of the influence of Zoroastrian eschatol­. ogy on such ideas as these of the.end of the world and resurrec­
tion of the dead. Moreover, 'in the Essene Dead Sea Scrolls oLthe
- .
last century B.c.,,,,-the influel1c~ of Persian thought is apparent-""at
every turn. ~heir period itself, in fact, w~ one of such te~rible tu.. omIt that' the end~f the world and comirtg of the savior Saoshyant

Joseph Campbell

[ I 54
M Y T H S T 0 L I V E ,8 Y
God. And that Christ may not have actually suffered in that lov­ing act we may take from a saying of the mystic Meister Eckhart: "To him who suffers but not for love, to suffer is suffering and hard to bear. But one who suffers for love suffers not, and his suf­fering is fruitful in God's sight."
Indeed, the very idea of a descent of God, into the world in love to invoke, in return, man's love to God, seems to me to imply ex­actly the contrary to the statement 1 have just quoted of Saint Paul. Implied, rather, it seems to me, is the idea that as mankind yearns for the grace of God, so God for the homage of mankind, the two yearnings being reciprocal. And the image,of the crucified as both true God and true man would then seem to bring to focus the matched terms of a mutual sacrifice-in the way not of atone­ment .in the penal sense, but of at-one-ment in the marital. And further: when extended to symbolize not only the one historic mo­ment of Christ's crucifixion on Calvary, but the mystery through all time and space of God's presence and participation in the agony of all living things, the sign of the cross would then have to be looked, upon as the sign of an eternal affirmation of all that is, ever was, or shall ever be. One thinks of Christ's words reported
in the Gnostic Gospel According to Thomas: "Cleave a piece of wood, I am there; lift up the stone, you will find me there." Also, those of Plato in the Timaeus, where he states that time is "the moving image of Eternity." Or again, those of William Blake: "Eternity is in love with the productions of time." And there is a memorable passage in the writings of Thomas Mann, where he celebrates ,man as "a noble meeting [eine hohe Begegnung] of Spirit and Nature in their yearning way to each other."
, We can safely say, therefore, that whereas some moralists may find it possible to make a distinction between two spheres and reigns-one of flesh, the other of the spirit, one of time, the other of eternity-wherever love arises such definitions vanish, and a sense of life awakens in which all such oppositions are at one.
The most widely revered Oriental personification of such a world-affirming attitude, transcending opposites, is that figure of

Page 156

 

Page 157

The Mythology of Love e
I 5'7 ]
yourself!-.and even better, beyond that, in the words that I take to be the highest, the noblest and boldest, of the Christian teach­ing: "Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute y<>,u, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for he makes his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. . . ."
In all the great traditional representations of love as compas­sion, charity, .or agape, the operation of the virtue is described as general and impersonal, transcending differences and even loyal­ties..,And against this higher, spirityal order of love there is set
,generally in opposition the lower, of lust, or, as it is so often called, "animal passion," which is equally general and impersonal, transcending qifferences and even loyalties. Indeed, one could de­scribe the latter most accurately, perhaps, simply as the zeal of the organs, male and female, for each other, and designate the writ­ings of Sigmund Freud as the definitive modern text on the subject of such love. However, in the European twelfth and early thir­teenth centurie~, in the poetry first of the troubadours of Provence, and then, with a new accent, of the Minnesingers, a way of experiencing love came to expression that was altogether different from either of those two as traditionally opposed. And since I re­gard this typically and exclusively European chapter of our subject as one., of the most important mutations not only of human feeling,
"
but also of the spiritual consciousness of our human race, I am
going to dwell on it a little, before proceeding to the final passages of this chapter.
To begin with, then: Marriage in the Middle Ages was almost exclusively asocial, family concern-as it has been forever, of
course, in Asia, and is to this day for many in the West. One was married according to family arrangements. Particularly in' aristo­cratic circles, young women hardly out of girlhood were married off as political pawns. And the Church, meanwhile, was sacra­mentalizing such unions with its inappropriately mystical language about the two that were now to be of one ft~sh, united thrQugh love and by God: and let no man put asunder what God. hath

Page 158

 

Page 159

The Mythology of Love
I 59 ]
that is to say, neither of Heaven nor of Hell, but of earth; grounded in the psyche of a particular individual and, specifically, the predilection of his eyes: their perception of another specific in­dividual and communication of her image to his heart-which is to be (as we are told in other documents of the time) a "noble" or "gentle" heart, capable of the emotion of love, amor, not simply lust.
And what, then, would be the nat~re of a love so born?
In the various contexts of Oriental erotic mysticism, whether of
the Near East or of India, the woman is J!lystic~ly interpreted as an occasion for the lover to experience depths beyond depths of transcendent illumination-much in the way of Dante's apprecia­tion of Beatrice. Not so among the troubadours. The beloved to them was a woman, not the manifestation of some divine princi­ple; and specifically, that woman. The love was for her. And the celebrated experience was an agony of earthly love: an effect of the fact that the union of love can never be absolutely realized on this earth. Love's joy is in its savor of eternity; love's pain, the passage of time; so that (as in Gottfried's words) "bitter sweetness and dear grief" are of its essence. And for those "who cannot bear grief, and desire but to bathe in bliss," the ambrosial potion of this greatest gift of life is a drink too strong. Gottfried even deified Love as a goddess, and brought his bewildered couple to her hidden wilderness-chapel, known as "The Grotto for People in Love," where stood, in the place of an altar, the noble crystalline bed of love.
Moreover-and this, to me, is the most profoundly moving pas­sage in Gottfried's version of the legend-when, on the ship sail­ing from Ireland (with which scene Wagner's opera commences), the young couple unwittingly drank the potion and became grad­ually aware of the love that for some time had been quietly grow­ing in their hearts, Brangaene, the faithful servant who by chance had left the fateful ftask unattended, said to them in dire warning, "That ftask and what it contained will be the death of you both!" To which Tristan answered, "So then, God's will be-done, whether

 


SATURN IN TRANSIT

BOUNDARIES OF MIND BODY AND SOUL

Erin Sullivan 1991

Page 163"

All heroes enter a wasteland, and endure times of challenge and testing. There are distinct time periods that are critical for action which are followed by experimentation and then maintenance. If the maintenance period extends beyond its usefulness then another critical period of change-on-demand occurs, and- so on. The archetypal hero's journey with all of its phases and turning-points parallels the Saturn transit as it moves over the angles and travels through the quadrants of the horoscope."

 

 

 

SATURN IN TRANSIT

BOUNDARIES OF MIND BODY AND SOUL

Erin Sullivan 1991

THE PERSONAL HEROIC JOURNEY

THE ATONEMENT (IC)

"When he arrives at. the nadir of the mythological round, he un­dergoes a supreme ordeal and gains his reward. The triumph may be represented as the hero's sexual union with the goddess-mother of the world (sacred marriage), his recognition by the father-creator (father atonement), his own divinization (apotheosis), or again - if the powers have remained unfriendly to him - his theft of the boon he came to gain (bridge-theft, fire-theft); intrinsically it is an ex­pansion of consciousness and therewith of being (illumination, transfiguration, freedom). Joseph Campbell 9

“I am He that lives, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive forevermore.” Revelation 1:18

 

 

No curved lines-A.E.F.H.I.K.L.M.N.T.V.W.X.Y.Z.No straight lines-C.O.S.No enclosed areas-C.E.F.G.H.I.J.K.L.M.N.S.T.U.V.W.X.Y.Z.Horizontal symmetry-B.C.D.E.H.I.K.O.X.Vertical symmetry-A.H.I.M.O.T.U.V.W.X.Y.Roman numerals-C.D.I.L.M.V.X.Just dots in Morse code-E.H.I.S.Just dashes in Morse code-M.O.T.Horizontal and vertical symmetry-H.I.O.X.Look the same upside down-H.I.N.O.S.X.Z.Can be drawn in one stroke-B.C.D.G.I.J.L.M.N.O.P.R.S.U.V.W.Z.

Capitals which look like lowercase-C.O.P.S.U.V.W.X.Z.

 

crystalinks.com/egyptreligion.

The ancient Greek word for interpreter/translator is Hermꮥus, directly related to the name of the god Hermes.

MYTHOLOGY

Hermes, the herald of the Olympian gods, is son of Zeus and the nymph Maia, daughter of Atlas and one of the Pleiades. Hermes is the god of shepherds, land travel, merchants, weights and measures, oratory, literature, athletics and thieves, and known for his cunning and shrewdness. Most importantly, he is the messenger of the gods. Besides that he was also a minor patron of poetry. He was worshipped throughout Greece - especially in Arcadia - and festivals in his honor were called Hermoea.

According to legend, Hermes was born in a cave on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia. Zeus had impregnated Maia at the dead of night while all other gods slept. When dawn broke amazingly he was born. Maia wrapped him in swaddling bands, then resting herself, fell fast asleep. Hermes, however, squirmed free and ran off to Thessaly. This is where Apollo, his brother, grazed his cattle. Hermes stole a number of the herd and drove them back to Greece. He hid them in a small grotto near to the city of Pylos and covered their tracks.

Before returning to the cave he caught a tortoise, killed it and removed its entrails. Using the intestines from a cow stolen from Apollo and the hollow tortoise shell, he made the first lyre. When he reached the cave he wrapped himself back into the swaddling bands. When Apollo realized he had been robbed he protested to Maia that it had been Hermes who had taken his cattle. Maia looked to Hermes and said it could not be, as he is still wrapped in swaddling bands. Zeus the all powerful intervened saying he had been watching and Hermes should return the cattle to Apollo. As the argument went on, Hermes began to play his lyre. The sweet music enchanted Apollo, and he offered Hermes to keep the cattle in exchange for the lyre. Apollo later became the grand master of the instrument, and it also became one of his symbols. Later while Hermes watched over his herd he invented the pipes known as a syrinx (pan-pipes), which he made from reeds. Hermes was also credited with inventing the flute. Apollo, also desired this instrument, so Hermes bartered with Apollo and received his golden wand which Hermes later used as his heralds staff. (In other versions Zeus gave Hermes his heralds staff).

Being the herald (messenger of the gods), it was his duty to guide the souls of the dead down to the underworld, which is known as a psychopomp. He was also closely connected with bringing dreams to mortals.

It was Hermes who liberated Io, the lover of Zeus, from the hundred-eyed giant Argus, who had been ordered by Hera, the jealous wife of Zeus, to watch over her. Hermes charmed the giant with his flute, and while Argos slept Hermes cut off his head and released Io. Hera, as a gesture of thanks to her loyal servant, scattered the hundred eyes of Argos over the tail of a peacock (Heras' sacred bird).

Known for his swiftness and athleticism, Hermes was given credit for inventing foot-racing and boxing. At Olympia a statue of him stood at the entrance to the stadium and his statues where in every gymnasium throughout Greece. Apart from herms, Hermes was a popular subject for artists. Both painted pottery and statuary show him in various forms, but the most fashionable depicted him as a good-looking young man, with an athletic body, and winged sandals and his heralds staff.

METAPHYSICS

Hermes was the Master of all arts and sciences, perfect in all crafts, Ruler of the Three Worlds, Scribe of the Gods, and Keeper of the Books of Life, Thoth Hermes Trismegistus - the Three Times, the "First Intelligencer" - was regarded by the ancient Egyptians as the embodiment of the Universal Mind. While in all probability there actually existed a great sage and educator by the name of Hermes, it is impossible to extricate the historical man from the mass of legendary accounts which attempt to identify him with the Cosmic Principle of Thought.

The Emerald Tablets of Thoth Hermes Trismegistus

Hermes was Thoth the Egyptian Scribe Who wrote the story of our reality

Hermes was Mercury - the Messenger of the Gods. Greek Gods of Mount Olympus - Mercury inherited Hermes' attributes

Hermes was the Trickster Representing the Duality of our Reality - Good vs. Evil. In the role of the Trickster he was also the god of thieves and deceit. His lessons are taught by tricking you.

Hermes was Merlin the Magician - linked to his role as the Trickster. His lessons are taught by Magic to help you see through the illusion of Time and Emotion.

Hermes - Ancient Mystery School Teachings - the Hermetic Orders - which is linked with Alchemy of Consciousness - - Moving to a higher frequency of thought - Releasing the Hermetic seals at the End of Time - Or the Illusion of Time - The release of the soul from the physical form.

An end time happens when the grid program of a reality - triggers a release into the next level of consciousness and all souls return to higher light.

 

HEINZ PAGELS

Page 90

Ateacller'" of2mathematics in 'pol'trevolutiopary"' Iran began his lec,ture onoprobabilify theory by holdfug- up a )lie which he was goingto~ use in a.-demo!}stration. 'Bewre-o he. could begin, an IslamiC fundamentalist student cried oUt, ""A satanic artifactr'~referring, of"-cours{;;' to. the die. Toe teach"et lost
5isry:ob 'and1alfuost his life.;The hotion olprobabilityis anti­
tij:«&cal~o~th(jse interpr~tafions of"l~lam which maintain that Gq"<llknows eve~ing~there is 110 placefof,chance (or many
religi()U~fifndamentalists~ . ~~ -- ,-:' - -',
'" Had the teacher been pe!Illitled to give~ h~ lecture, we
'<;ilI1 im~giIfe <what'he 'would" have told the stu<ten.t~ He IDay Ilaye emphasized the application of probability theory to"lhe
reaI"Wodd and begun with :the operational d~finition of ptob--.,
ability. This kirid""of def!nition,is 'required because we do not hav~:: aii'iritrillsic' definition of randomness-something we learlledJrom the last chapter. We cannot determine whether Q)- not iiP actual process is truly .random. All we can do is~ to check and see if the process passes lots of testsJthat random
,processes are-supposed to pass.-so that it is "sufficiently ran­dom/' III practice this works -fine, but there is al'f,ays a problem in pHnciple-we ~ever'know.Jf someone will Gevise / Page 91 / ,,~cleveJ' new test that I:eveals thaL what we thoughf was '­
~randouFreally is not. ~ - - iC
-g In spite' of th~ matllematical difficultY of deJlning~ ran-,""
domness, we. can take a'f-praginatic attitude, as dId. Richard
von MisJ!s. H~ said thatthe practical ~defInition oh randOlrt~ proces's'is:tl1at it is unbeatable. The pJ"actical defi!lition~orks~~ like this. Suppose that a gambling m:ichine'is built thaLwfu~~
iHt geQerates random numbers. Then over tl)e long run yoU::~ cannot beat it withimy strategy, and we could say that the~ numbers are really random ror.;; practical purposes. H there
~was it flaw in the machine and the numbers were not really­random"and sO!lle"specmc number came up more'often, then we could use - this knowledge~ to .b~at the machine~ ReaJ rkdomness is unbeatable. This practical definition of ran-"'" domness is good for the real world. .GambJinghouses and= insurance companie,s altuse it. And because~rand9mness is unbeatable and they base their business on that fact; they ~lwayswin. ~.
. I( we look in nature for randomness we nnd the besf place to, look for chaos "is right in the atom-there is no" 0,
randomness like qU~tum randomn~s. H we test processes :.
like nuclearnfdioactive' decays w.to particles, they pass all the ­
Aests for randomnesS: ,When and where an atom decays is..
truly random. Wl:!!le we can lmagine a flaw in.;a g~bling'7 machine, physicisfs~find no. such flaw in the quantum' world. _. Quantum randomness cannot be beat; the God that plays dice is an honest gambler. But how do we study such randomness?
~; - Laplace and other mathematicians had the great Illsight that although individuaL random events ~ere mel!ningless; the distribution of those events was not and could be the~
subjectcof an exact science-probability theory. The~ntral
idea of ~probabj)ity theory is. the notion of a probability
'distribution-the assignment or probabilities to a set of re""" lated events. A simple example is coin flipping. The probabil­
ity of heads is one-half and tails is one~half, and if you aHd up­the probabilities, they add up to one. A probability of one is the same as certainty: If you flip a coin it must come up=
either heads or tails. .
. Q!lce you have assigned the elementary probabilities, it is possible to go much further. It 'is possible. to comp!,1te probabilities for complex events. Take a single die., The probability of a single number from 1 to 6 coming up js assigned 1/6. Now suppose we throw two dice" as~is common

 

Page 92

THE COSMIC CODE
"In most dice games. The sum of the numbers on each die can run from 2 to 12. But they are not all equally probable. For example, the only way to throw a total of 2 is for each die to come up with a 1. Since the probability for each die to come up 1 is 1/6 and each event is independent, the joint probabil­ity is given by the product 1/6 X 1/6 = 1/36. On the average, throwing two dice, you will throw a 2 only once every 36 rolls.
.. You can throw a 3 in two different ways. The first die comes up 1 and the second die 2. This event also has a probability of 1/6 x 1/6 = 1/36. However, one could also achieve a total of 3 by the first die coming up 2 and the second die 1. This also has a probability 00/36. So the total probability of rolling a 3 is 1/36 + 1/36 = 1/18. Proceeding in this way of counting options, one can make a table of how the probability is distributed over the various throws.

 

The probability of different throws from a pair of dice. It seems as if

there is, a "force" or an "invisible hand" which makes the 7 come up

most often, but actually this is just a consequence of mathematical

probabilities

If you had to bet on a single number's coming up, the number to bet on is 7; it has the highest probability. If you had to bet on five out of the eleven numbers coming up, then bet on 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 because they come up two out of three times; the remaining six numbers 2, 3, 4, 10, 11, and 12, . come up only one out of three times. What tells these numbers to turn up with these frequencies? We see that this probability distribution is just a consequence of mathematical combinatorics-adding up the different combinations by which a specific throw can be achieved. But it seems as if there is an "invisible hand" that pushes for the 7 more often than the other numbers. The remarkable feature of probability distri­/ Page 94 /

 

mtions}ror re:[events is4hat the:o:distnbutio'h isn't tnaterlal­

y~f it it manifested as a~kind 6f invisible force~ 011 material ­

mings"fil{e dice. ,-" "" s ~ "".­

Prooilbili!y= distributions"'of real, events like tho~eAor 0: thrOwing- dice are part of the invisible world. The cdis-tribu- ­

C'~tiR~s are invisible not because like atoms theyare-:mat~rially

small but because they art?"11ot material at all. What isvil'ible~ is~1ndividual material events like the throw o[dice. Pro1Ja:bil-~

ity;distril:mtions, are~like invisible hands thafdo not touch. A

c g<fo<I exanJple';iS" the slow, invisib1e processoof biological- evo--;

: lution. =-Tlfis process'becomes real only-when.we go beyond

th~, ~eemingly, random events and, examin~ the ,probability ~

di~tributJonstliat gi,[5\-objectivesignmcanceto environmental : pressure on a species to'-evolve into another species more­ likely to survive in - that environI:IJPnt. Distributions of ev~nts ~ seem to .have an obje6tivity nqCpossessedby anAndividual random event. -In the microscopic world of atoms wethave already'seen tfiat it is the distribution of events that is speci- os fled by the quantum-'- theory; not the~ individual event. The quantum pro~bility distributiofis, the--invisible hands af tl)e atomic level, are actUally responsible for the chemical forces.

that _bind'atoms tog~ther., ~ ­

- We might imagine that"probability distributions, beFause they haye some kind of objectivity, have an exisfenceiQ.de­p~fi.denfof toe individual event. This errpr can result In _'f-= thinking thatth~ .distributlon""cau~es"the events to fall inter-a :is; spe~mccpatteI1l" Thisis secular fatalism-the belief that Ilrob~ ~ ability distribri.!ions influence toe outcome of single events,,- ;­Bur this is "backwar-d" reasoning, because it is the sin~e events 'which establish the distiibution, not the other~way aroung. By introducing a nonrandom element, an,..elemeIit of ~ organizatiim on the lev_el of individual events, one changes

the probability distribution. If you load dice they~will fall - :­ differently. -:0­

While the invisibility and objectivity of distributions is amazing, another remarkable feature of probability distribu­tionsis their stability, whether they are distriqutions of atomic. motions in matter, chemical reactions, or biological and social events. A stable distribution, one which does not change/With

time, is called", ail equilibrium distribution. ;The probability ­distributions of dice-throws we do not expect to- change in' tiIpe, because the dice are not subject to temporal forces., But what abQ!lt the probability of breaking a leg in a ski accident

 

 

Joseph Campbell

[ I 54
M Y T H S T 0 L I V E ,8 Y
God. And that Christ may not have actually suffered in that lov­ing act we may take from a saying of the mystic Meister Eckhart: "To him who suffers but not for love, to suffer is suffering and hard to bear. But one who suffers for love suffers not, and his suf­fering is fruitful in God's sight."
Indeed, the very idea of a descent of God, into the world in love to invoke, in return, man's love to God, seems to me to imply ex­actly the contrary to the statement 1 have just quoted of Saint Paul. Implied, rather, it seems to me, is the idea that as mankind yearns for the grace of God, so God for the homage of mankind, the two yearnings being reciprocal. And the image,of the crucified as both true God and true man would then seem to bring to focus the matched terms of a mutual sacrifice-in the way not of atone­ment .in the penal sense, but of at-one-ment in the marital. And further: when extended to symbolize not only the one historic mo­ment of Christ's crucifixion on Calvary, but the mystery through all time and space of God's presence and participation in the agony of all living things, the sign of the cross would then have to be looked, upon as the sign of an eternal affirmation of all that is, ever was, or shall ever be. One thinks of Christ's words reported
in the Gnostic Gospel According to Thomas: "Cleave a piece of wood, I am there; lift up the stone, you will find me there." Also, those of Plato in the Timaeus, where he states that time is "the moving image of Eternity." Or again, those of William Blake: "Eternity is in love with the productions of time." And there is a memorable passage in the writings of Thomas Mann, where he celebrates ,man as "a noble meeting [eine hohe Begegnung] of Spirit and Nature in their yearning way to each other."
, We can safely say, therefore, that whereas some moralists may find it possible to make a distinction between two spheres and reigns-one of flesh, the other of the spirit, one of time, the other of eternity-wherever love arises such definitions vanish, and a sense of life awakens in which all such oppositions are at one.
The most widely revered Oriental personification of such a world-affirming attitude, transcending opposites, is that figure of

Page 156

 

Page 157

The Mythology of Love e
I 5'7 ]
yourself!-.and even better, beyond that, in the words that I take to be the highest, the noblest and boldest, of the Christian teach­ing: "Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute y<>,u, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for he makes his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust. . . ."
In all the great traditional representations of love as compas­sion, charity, .or agape, the operation of the virtue is described as general and impersonal, transcending differences and even loyal­ties..,And against this higher, spirityal order of love there is set
,generally in opposition the lower, of lust, or, as it is so often called, "animal passion," which is equally general and impersonal, transcending qifferences and even loyalties. Indeed, one could de­scribe the latter most accurately, perhaps, simply as the zeal of the organs, male and female, for each other, and designate the writ­ings of Sigmund Freud as the definitive modern text on the subject of such love. However, in the European twelfth and early thir­teenth centurie~, in the poetry first of the troubadours of Provence, and then, with a new accent, of the Minnesingers, a way of experiencing love came to expression that was altogether different from either of those two as traditionally opposed. And since I re­gard this typically and exclusively European chapter of our subject as one., of the most important mutations not only of human feeling,
"
but also of the spiritual consciousness of our human race, I am
going to dwell on it a little, before proceeding to the final passages of this chapter.
To begin with, then: Marriage in the Middle Ages was almost exclusively asocial, family concern-as it has been forever, of
course, in Asia, and is to this day for many in the West. One was married according to family arrangements. Particularly in' aristo­cratic circles, young women hardly out of girlhood were married off as political pawns. And the Church, meanwhile, was sacra­mentalizing such unions with its inappropriately mystical language about the two that were now to be of one ft~sh, united thrQugh love and by God: and let no man put asunder what God. hath

Page 158

 

Page 159

The Mythology of Love
I 59 ]
that is to say, neither of Heaven nor of Hell, but of earth; grounded in the psyche of a particular individual and, specifically, the predilection of his eyes: their perception of another specific in­dividual and communication of her image to his heart-which is to be (as we are told in other documents of the time) a "noble" or "gentle" heart, capable of the emotion of love, amor, not simply lust.
And what, then, would be the nat~re of a love so born?
In the various contexts of Oriental erotic mysticism, whether of
the Near East or of India, the woman is J!lystic~ly interpreted as an occasion for the lover to experience depths beyond depths of transcendent illumination-much in the way of Dante's apprecia­tion of Beatrice. Not so among the troubadours. The beloved to them was a woman, not the manifestation of some divine princi­ple; and specifically, that woman. The love was for her. And the celebrated experience was an agony of earthly love: an effect of the fact that the union of love can never be absolutely realized on this earth. Love's joy is in its savor of eternity; love's pain, the passage of time; so that (as in Gottfried's words) "bitter sweetness and dear grief" are of its essence. And for those "who cannot bear grief, and desire but to bathe in bliss," the ambrosial potion of this greatest gift of life is a drink too strong. Gottfried even deified Love as a goddess, and brought his bewildered couple to her hidden wilderness-chapel, known as "The Grotto for People in Love," where stood, in the place of an altar, the noble crystalline bed of love.
Moreover-and this, to me, is the most profoundly moving pas­sage in Gottfried's version of the legend-when, on the ship sail­ing from Ireland (with which scene Wagner's opera commences), the young couple unwittingly drank the potion and became grad­ually aware of the love that for some time had been quietly grow­ing in their hearts, Brangaene, the faithful servant who by chance had left the fateful ftask unattended, said to them in dire warning, "That ftask and what it contained will be the death of you both!" To which Tristan answered, "So then, God's will be-done, whether

 


SECRET CHAMBER

THE QUEST FOR THE HALL OF RECORDS

Robert Bauval

1

999

The Hall of Records

Page 167

"Gerald Massey published between 1883 and 1907. Massey, who is described as 'a poet, Shakespearean scholar, mythographer and radical Egyptologist', wrote this of the Sphinx of Giza:
The great Sphinx as keeper of these secrets was couched in mountainous repose upon the horizon in the eastern equinox, when the gate of 'fair exit' was in the lion sign and the gates of 'fair entrancc' was in Aquarius, the water sign, that is figured over the abyss of source on the celestial globe. The Sphinx thcn is a figure of the double horizon and the duality of Har-Makhu when the place of conjunction was at the point of precession in thc lion sign. And if, as is the Egyptian way, the fact was registered forthwith, we may date the Sphinx as a monument which was reared by thcse great builders and thinkers, who lived so largely out of themselves, some thirteen thousand years ago. 58
Other ideas in Cayce's readings, such as the 'Great White Brother­hood' and the initiatory function of the Great Pyramid of the 'last' or higher 'degrees', can be found in the popular literature of Helena Blavatsky and the Theosophical movement that was also widely circu­lating at the times Edgar Cayce gave his first readings on the pyramids in 1931. In two particular works by Blavatsky, The Secret Doctrine and Isis Unveiled, both published in the late 1870s, there is much talk of the 'root races' of the world, the White Brotherhood and the Masonic style by degree initiations in the Great Pyramid of Giza. 59 Blavatsky also claimed that the empty coffer in the King's Chamber of the Great Pyramid was 'a baptismal font upon emerging from which the neophyte was born again and became an adept', meaning that the neophyte experienced death and learnt of its mystery.60 Blavatsky herself had apparently spent a whole night alone in the King's Chamber in 1886 where 'she had some remark­able experiences'.61 This idea, too, is expressed in the Cayce readings; for when asked about the meaning of the empty sarcophagus in the King's Chamber and what could be learnt from it, the following answer was given:
That there will be no more death. Don't misunderstand or misintcrpret! But the interpretation of dcath will be made plain.62"

 

 

CIRCLE CIRCLES CIRCLEING CIRCLED

39933E 39933ES 39933E9NG 399339

 

ENCIRCLE ENCIRCLES ENCIRCLEING ENCIRCLED

EN39933E EN39933ES EN39933E9NG EN399339

 

CIRCUMFERENCE CIRCUMCISION CIRCUMCISING CIRCUMCISED

CIRCU465RENCE CIRCU43I1I65 CIRCU43I1I53 CIRCU43I1ED

 

 

I

ATEN

ZERO = O = ZERO

ONE AND ZERO ZERO AND ONE

ISISIS ZERO = ONE = ONE = ZERO ISISIS

RA OSIRIS ERECT PENIS = I = PENIS ERECT OSIRIS RA

ISISIS ZERO CIRCLE VAGINA = O = VAGINA CIRCLE ZERO ISISIS

999999999666666666101010101010101010010101010101010101666666666999999999

 

 

 

AUGERIES OF INNOCENCE

"Every Night and every Morn
Some to Misery are Born.
Every Morn and every Night
Some are Born to sweet Delight.
Some are Born to sweet Delight,
Some are born to Endless Night.
We are led to Believe a Lie
When we see not Thro' the Eye
Which was Born in a Night to Perish in a Night
When the Soul Slept in Beams of Light.
God Appears and God is Light
To those poor Souls who dwell in the Night,
But does a Human Form Display
To those who Dwell in Realms of day."

William Blake 1757 - 1827

 

5
MYRRH
     
-
M+Y
38
11
2
-
R
18
9
9
-
R
18
9
9
-
H
8
8
8
5
MYRRH
82
37
1
-
-
8+2
3+7
-
5
MYRRH
10
10
1
-
-
1+0
1+0
-
5
MYRRH
1
1
1

 

 

HOLY BIBLE

Scofield References

GENESIS

C 17 V 23

Page27

AND ABRAHAM WAS NINETY YEARS OLD AND NINE

WHEN HE WAS CIRCUMCISED IN THE FLESH OF HIS FORESKIN

 

 

FORESKIN FORCE KIN KIN FORCE FORESKIN

 

 

38
SIMULATIONS OF GOD
is a Star Maker who has any knowledge of what humans do. This in a sense is the existential position,
- without religion and without the kinds of experiences about which I and others have written. In other words, in order to make one's self God. in the sense of he who controls our planet, with nuclear power, chemical and biological warfare, and political means of exerting power within a very limited framework, one assumes God-like powers and believes there is nothing else but one's self and one's own species.
With this belief system, the be-all and end-all is humanity. There is nothing on the planet comparable to humanity. All other species are potential victims of the human species. There are no unknowns in com­munication with either these species or at-present­undiscovered species elsewhere in our galaxy. This view is quite as dogmatic and dangerous as the view of the Catholic Church during the Inquisition, of the Moham­medans following Mohammed, of the hordes of Genghis Khan coming into Europe, or of Attila the Hun.
Currently the depredations in oui disturbed ecology permitted by this point of view are endangering all humans and other species on our planet. "I am God" in this limited sense is a very dangerous assumption on which to operate. It is unbalanced, limited and closed; it is not an open system of belief nor of thought nor of doing. The kinds of difficulties that this belief system can lead to were seen in the Senate hearings concerning the Nixon Administration. If there is no accountability of the human species to the planet or to the solar system or to the universe; if the human species are isolates and their survival depends only upon themselves and upon nobody else, they cannot afford this arrogant belief system. Their God would be too small.
In other words, a God who is trapped by human belief systems and accountable within those systems is really not large enough for the univers~ as we know it. With the proper belief systems concerning other species, concerning communication pathways at present

I AM GOD
39
unavailable to our science as we believe it and know it, "I am God" become a humanistic solipsism: hu­manity stewing in its own juices, unable to see beyond nuclear weapons, chemical and biological warfare, in­dustrial waste, pollution of the seas and the atmosphere, the killing of one another and the preying upon of all other species of the planet. Man's inhumanity to man is a result of lack of knowledge of the states of consciousness which I and others have described, and of lack of respect for the human potential as opposed to the human past.
One thing I do know, and that is that my seIf­metaprogrammer does not believe that it is God. My self-metaprogrammer cannot say, "I am God." In every area in which my self-metaprogrammer has attempted to take that position, I have been taught, and very carefully taught, by horrendous experiences, that my self-metaprogrammer is not omniscient, is not omnipo­
tent, is not omnipresent, and is not "the Creator" of .
the rest of the universe. Nor is it the creator of itself.
In my experiences with essence, I began to feel a connection with a something far greater than I as a single human being, than all of humanity as we know it, much greater than this planet, this solar system, this
universe-a something that does contact those humans.
who are willing to enter those states of consciousness in which contact is possible and probable. We are learning some of the parameters, some of the self­metaprograms which lead to connections of these kinds. I myself maintain a certain skepticism until I can demonstrate unequivocally that which I know to be tru~an demonstrate it to those open-minded skeptics who are willing to try the experiments that I and others have tried. I feel that we are now on the threshold of being able to demonstrate the phenomena we have discovered to those who will listen and to those who will experiment.
The human software for changing belief systems, expanding them, opening them up and incorporating the unknown as a part of our belief systems is becom­

Foppish dandy
prince of prose,
balls held high by silken hose.
Eyes putout are in.
To know, such a joy,
and taste the irony,
sweet pungent bitterness wrought,
and graciously accept, the price/prize your freedom bought/brought.
Trans-moggyeyed, moggyfried.
Katweazle, the very mirror doubts a copy cat.
Making chiaroscuro, of those savants of the taste buds.
Sweated, sweet relief released.
Pure enjoyment, albeit for self.

When gay is to guy. But why?

And can on a blink,

of quilled pen, stroke, n' ink.

See gay guy

become gayguygay counter.

When speaking in tongues.

Is freaking in puns,

of words, so miss-spelt, and ill-used/misused:

then evil is live

and death not survive.

Museum,

two mews, n', the cat

and Hugh Heifer the rabbit spell.

The calf said, I'm half the man of half the man I was before

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Friday, May 25, 2007

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Compiled by George Legge

QUESTION

Is the biblical Commandment
'thou shalt not kill' a mistranslation?
Should it be 'thou shall not murder'?

THE Hebrew word rawh-tsach (literally 'to dash to pieces') translates more accurately as murder, but the definition of 'murder' in the Bible is somewhat broader than today's. It included causing accidental death. Ending a human life wasn't always viewed as 'murder.' Avenging a proven murder was taken as appropriate punishment. Criminals and offenders could also be hanged (Deuteronomy 21, v 22), stoned or even burned in public executions.

According to Numbers 35, a law was passed that provided refuge from the revenge by the family of the deceased for a person who killed another 'without intent'.

This was in the form of three cities of refuge on either side of the River Jordan. The refugee could remain safely in these six cities
until the death of the 'Cohen' - or high priest - after which they could return home with impunity.
John Smith Wilkinson, Stockport.

 

 

www.britannica.com/eb/topic-124525/cohen

Cohen or Cohanim or Kohanim or Kohen (Jewish Priest)

Main article

Jewish Priest, one who is a descendant of Zadok, founder of the priesthood of Jerusalem when the First Temple was built by Solomon (10th century BC) and through Zadok related to Aaron, the first Jewish Priest, who was appointed to that office by his younger brother, Moses. Though laymen such as Gideon, David, and Solomon offered sacrifice as God commanded, the Hebrew priesthood was hereditary.

comparison with Israelites

In liturgical usage, an Israelite is a Jew who is neither a cohen (descendant of Aaron, the first high priest) nor a Levite (descendant of early religious functionaries). The distinction is significant, for if a cohen is present for synagogue service, he must be called up first for the reading of the Law; he is then followed by a Levite.

 

Page 274

CHAPTER XXI

The Great Pan Is Dead

EVERYONE HAS ONCE READ, for it comes up many times in litera ture, of that pilot in the reign of Tiberius, who, as he was sailing along in the Aegean on a quiet evening, heard a loud voice an­nouncing that "Great Pan was dead." This engaging myth was interpreted in two contradictory ways. On the one hand, it an­nounced the end of paganism: Pan with his pipes, the demon of still sun-drenched noon, the pagan god of glade and pasture and the rural idyll, had yielded to the supernatural. On the other hand the myth has been understood as telling of the death of Christ in the 19th year of Tiberius: the Son of God who was everything from Alpha to Omega was identified with Pan = "All."l
Here is the story, as told by a character in Plutarch's dialogue "On why oracles came to fail" (419 B-E):
The father of Aemilianus the orator, to whom some of you have listened, was Epitherses, who lived in our town and was my teacher in grammar. He said that once upon a time in making a voyage to Italy he embarked on a ship carrying freight and many passengers.

Page 276

It was already evening when, near the Echinades Islands, the wind dropped and the ship drifted near Paxi. Almost everybody was awake, and a good many had not finished their after-dinner wine.
Suddenly from the island of Paxi was heard the voice of someone loudly calling Thamus, so that all were amazed. Thamus was an Egyptian pilot, not known by name even to many on board. Twice he was called and made no reply, but the third time he answered; and the caller, raising his voice, said, "When you come opposite to Palodes, announce that Great Pan is dead." On hearing this, all, said Epitherses, were astounded and reasoned among themselves whether it were better to carry out the order or to refuse to meddle and let the matter go. Under the circumstances Thamus made up his mind that if there should be a breeze, he would sail past and keep quiet, but with no wind and a smooth sea about the place he would announce what he had heard. So, when he came opposite Palodes, and there was neither wind nor wave, Thamus from the stern, looking toward the land, said the words as he heard them: "Great Pan is dead." Even before he had finished there was a great cry of lamenta­tion, not of one person, but of many, mingled with exclamations of amazement. As many persons were on the vessel, the story was soon spread abroad in Rome, and Thamus was sent for by Tiberius Caesar. Tiberius became so convinced of the truth of the story that he caused an inquiry and investigation to be made about Pan; and the scholars, who were numerous at his court, conjectured that he was the son born of Hermes and Penelope.
Plutarch has not been accepted, and a "simple" explanation was suggested. As the ship drifted along shore by a coastal village, the passengers were struck by the ritual outcry and lamentations made over the death of Tammuz-Adonis, the so-called grain god, as was common in the Middle East in high summer. Other confused shouts were understOod by the pilot Thamus as directed to him.2 Out of that, gullible fantasy embroidered the tale, adding details for credi­bility as usual. This sounded good enough. The story had been normalized, that is, disposed of as insignificant.
One is still allowed to wonder why such a fuss was made at the time about exclamations which must have been familiar to contem­poraries, and why, unless Plutarch be a liar, that most learned of mythologists, the Emperor Tiberius himself, thought the matter worth following up.
2 See F. Liebrechr, Des Gervasius van Tilbury Otia hnperialia (1856) pp. 179-80; J. G. Frazcr, Tbe Dying God (Golden Bougb 3), pp. 7f.

 

 

Note 1

1 O Weinreich ("Zum Tode des Grossen Pan," ARW 13 [1910] pp. 467-73) has collected the evidence for such strange notions, first found in 1549 (GuiJIaume Bigot), then three years later in Rabelais' Pantagruel, and ridiculed in later times, e.g., by Fontenelle, in the beginning of the 18th century: "Ce grand Pan qui meurt sous Tibere, aussi bien que Jesus-Christ, est le Maistre des Demons, dont l'Empire est ruine par cette mort d'un Dieu si salutaire a l'Univers; ou si cette expli­cation ne vous plaist pas, car enfin on peut sans impiete donner des sens contraires a une mesme chose, quoy qu'elle regarde la Religion; ce grand Pan est Jesus-Christ luy-mesme, dont la mort cause une douleur et une consternation generale parmy les Demons, qui ne peuvent plus exercer leur tirannie sur les hommes. C'est ainsi qu'on a trouve moyen de donner a ce grand Pan deux faces bien differentes" (Weinreich, pp. 472-73).

 

Page 274

CHAPTER XXI

The Great Pan Is Dead

EVERYONE HAS ONCE READ, for it comes up many times in litera ture, of that pilot in the reign of Tiberius, who, as he was sailing along in the Aegean on a quiet evening, heard a loud voice an­nouncing that "Great Pan was dead." This engaging myth was interpreted in two contradictory ways. On the one hand, it an­nounced the end of paganism: Pan with his pipes, the demon of still sun-drenched noon, the pagan god of glade and pasture and the rural idyll, had yielded to the supernatural. On the other hand the myth has been understood as telling of the death of Christ in the 19th year of Tiberius: the Son of God who was everything from Alpha to Omega was identified with Pan = "All."l
Here is the story, as told by a character in Plutarch's dialogue "On why oracles came to fail" (419 B-E):
The father of Aemilianus the orator, to whom some of you have listened, was Epitherses, who lived in our town and was my teacher in grammar. He said that once upon a time in making a voyage to Italy he embarked on a ship carrying freight and many passengers.

Page 276

It was already evening when, near the Echinades Islands, the wind dropped and the ship drifted near Paxi. Almost everybody was awake, and a good many had not finished their after-dinner wine.
Suddenly from the island of Paxi was heard the voice of someone loudly calling Thamus, so that all were amazed. Thamus was an Egyptian pilot, not known by name even to many on board. Twice he was called and made no reply, but the third time he answered; and the caller, raising his voice, said, "When you come opposite to Palodes, announce that Great Pan is dead." On hearing this, all, said Epitherses, were astounded and reasoned among themselves whether it were better to carry out the order or to refuse to meddle and let the matter go. Under the circumstances Thamus made up his mind that if there should be a breeze, he would sail past and keep quiet, but with no wind and a smooth sea about the place he would announce what he had heard. So, when he came opposite Palodes, and there was neither wind nor wave, Thamus from the stern, looking toward the land, said the words as he heard them: "Great Pan is dead." Even before he had finished there was a great cry of lamenta­tion, not of one person, but of many, mingled with exclamations of amazement. As many persons were on the vessel, the story was soon spread abroad in Rome, and Thamus was sent for by Tiberius Caesar. Tiberius became so convinced of the truth of the story that he caused an inquiry and investigation to be made about Pan; and the scholars, who were numerous at his court, conjectured that he was the son born of Hermes and Penelope.
Plutarch has not been accepted, and a "simple" explanation was suggested. As the ship drifted along shore by a coastal village, the passengers were struck by the ritual outcry and lamentations made over the death of Tammuz-Adonis, the so-called grain god, as was common in the Middle East in high summer. Other confused shouts were understOod by the pilot Thamus as directed to him.2 Out of that, gullible fantasy embroidered the tale, adding details for credi­bility as usual. This sounded good enough. The story had been normalized, that is, disposed of as insignificant.
One is still allowed to wonder why such a fuss was made at the time about exclamations which must have been familiar to contem­poraries, and why, unless Plutarch be a liar, that most learned of mythologists, the Emperor Tiberius himself, thought the matter worth following up.
2 See F. Liebrechr, Des Gervasius van Tilbury Otia hnperialia (1856) pp. 179-80; J. G. Frazcr, Tbe Dying God (Golden Bougb 3), pp. 7f.

 

DAILY MAIL

Thursday, May 24, 2007

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS

Compiled by George Legge

More taxation, vicar?

QUESTION

Page 80

"How did Conrad Noel come to be called The Red Vicar of Thaxted?

THE Hon Rev. Conrad Noel (1869­1942) was an ancestor of mine. He was the son of respected minor poet Roden Baptist Wriothesley Noel, and grandson of Charles Noel, Viscount Campden and first Earl (second creation) of Gains borough.

Conrad was much influenced by his poet father's socialism, thoUgh the latter advocated peaceful means to change society while Conrad's political views verged on the revolutionary.

Roden's effect on Conrad was particularly strong in giving him an imaginative sympathy for the outcasts of society.

Intending to follow a family tradition by going into the Church, Conrad was originally refused ordination because he was regarded as a Pantheist, subscribing to the belief that God and the universe were identical, denying the person­ality and transcendence of God.

His suspected support of Panthe­ism was based on his known approval of his father's opinion, expressed in a letter, that: 'Pan is
not dead
, save in the sense that God manifest in Nature is now, since the revelation of Our Lord Jesus Christ, to be less worshipped than God manifest in Divine humanity.'

Once accepted by the Church, he veered away from the Anglican Church's evangelical wing, traditionally supported by his family, to embrace extreme Anglo-Catholicism.

But he disapproved of anything he deemed 'Romeish', despite the conversion of the main line of his family to Roman Catholicism. Conrad held that the Church of England was the only true home of Catholic Christianity.

He was a colourful character of diverse talents whose chief claim to fame was his championing of Christian Socialism.

As vicar of Thaxted, Essex, from 1910 until his death in 1942, he became famous for his fiery ser­mons in favour of High Anglican­ism ,and Socialism - hence the 'Red Vicar"tag.

Actively assisted by his curate, Jack Putterill (dubbed 'the other Red Vicar ofThaxted'), he founded the Order of Christian Socialists.

He wrote several books on social­ism, particularly in connection with ecclesiastical matters, and, just before he died, dictated an autobiography published after his death entitled Conrad Le Despencer Roden Noel: An Autobiography, edited by Sidney Dark (J.M. Dent & Sons, London 1945)

Gerard Noel,
Chipping Camp den, Glos.

"His suspected support of Panthe­ism was based on his known approval of his father's opinion, expressed in a letter, that'Pan is
not dead
,"

 

GREAT PAN IS NOT DEAD

 

 

6
NIMROD
73
37
1
4
KING
41
23
5
2
OF
21
12
3
11
MESOPOTAMIA
127
46
1
23
First Total
262
118
10
2+3
Add to Reduce
2+6+2
1+1+8
1+0
5
Second Total
10
10
1
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
-
5
Essence of Number
1
1
1

 

 

4
KING
41
23
5
2
OF
21
12
3
11
MESOPOTAMIA
127
46
1
17
First Total
189
81
9
1+7
Add to Reduce
1+8+9
8+1
-
8
Second Total
18
9
9
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
-
8
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
5
EAGLE
30
21
3
3
HAS
28
10
1
6
LANDED
40
22
4
17
First Total
131
68
14
1+7
Add to Reduce
1+3+1
6+8
1+4
8
Second Total
5
14
5
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
14
-
8
Essence of Number
5
1+4
5

 

 

-
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
+
=
22
2+2
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
19
-
-
-
14
-
-
-
+
=
49
4+9
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
5
1
7
3
5
-
-
1
-
-
3
1
-
4
5
4
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
-
20
-
5
-
5
1
7
12
5
-
-
1
-
-
12
1
-
4
5
4
+
=
82
8+2
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
20
8
5
-
5
1
7
12
5
-
8
1
19
-
12
1
14
4
5
4
+
=
131
1+3+1
=
5
=
5
=
5
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
1
7
3
5
-
8
1
1
-
3
1
5
4
5
4
+
=
68
6+8
=
14
1+4
5
=
5
-
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
1
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
2
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
2
=
8
=
8
-
-
-
-
5
-
5
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
5
=
25
2+5
7
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
=
7
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
2
=
16
1+6
7
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
17
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
30
-
-
17
-
68
-
41
1+5
1+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3+0
-
-
1+7
-
6+8
-
4+1
6
8
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
3
-
-
8
-
14
-
5
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
1
7
3
5
-
8
1
1
-
3
1
5
4
5
4
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
1+4
-
-
6
8
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
3
-
-
8
-
5
-
5

 

 

15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
1
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
+
=
22
2+2
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
19
-
-
-
14
-
-
-
+
=
49
4+9
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
5
1
7
3
5
-
-
1
-
-
3
1
-
4
5
4
+
=
46
4+6
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
20
-
5
-
5
1
7
12
5
-
-
1
-
-
12
1
-
4
5
4
+
=
82
8+2
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
20
8
5
-
5
1
7
12
5
-
8
1
19
-
12
1
14
4
5
4
+
=
131
1+3+1
=
5
=
5
=
5
-
2
8
5
-
5
1
7
3
5
-
8
1
1
-
3
1
5
4
5
4
+
=
68
6+8
=
14
1+4
5
=
5
15
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
1
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
4
=
4
=
4
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
2
=
6
=
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
2
=
8
=
8
-
-
-
5
-
5
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
5
=
25
2+5
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
occurs
x
1
=
7
=
7
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
2
=
16
1+6
7
17
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
30
-
-
17
-
68
-
41
1+7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3+0
-
-
1+7
-
6+8
-
4+1
8
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
3
-
-
8
-
14
-
5
-
2
8
5
-
5
1
7
3
5
-
8
1
1
-
3
1
5
4
5
4
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
1+4
-
-
8
T
H
E
-
E
A
G
L
E
-
H
A
S
-
L
A
N
D
E
D
-
-
3
-
-
8
-
5
-
5

 

 

12
CLYTEMNESTRA
155
47
2
8
DAUGHTER
84
39
3
2
OF
21
12
3
9
TYNDAREUS
-
-
-
6
T+Y+N+D+A+R
82
28
1
3
E+U+S
45
18
9
9
TYNDAREUS
127
46
10
-
-
1+2+7
4+6
1+0
9
TYNDAREUS
10
10
1
-
-
1+0
1+0
-
9
TYNDAREUS
1
1
1

 

 

I

SAY

THREAD THAT THREAD

THREAD READ DEATH DEATH READ THREAD

THREAD R DEATH DEATH R THREAD

THREAD READ DEAR DAERHT

 

 

THE NEW ELIZABETHAN

REFERENCE DICTIONARY

An up-to-date vocabulary of the living English language

Circa 1900

FOURTH EDITION

Page 1472

thread (thred) [A.-S. thraed, from thrawan, to THROW (cp. Dut. draad, G. draht, Icel. thrathr)], n. A slender cord consisting of two or more yarns doubled or twisted ; a single filament of cotton, silk, wool, etc., esp. Lisle thread ; anything resembling this ; a fine line of colour etc. ; a thin seam or vein ; the spiral on a screw ; (fig.) a continuous course (of life etc.). v.t. To pass a thread through the eye or aperture of ; to string (beads etc.) on a thread ; (fig.) to pick (one's way) or to go through an intricate or crowded place, etc. ; to streak (the hair) with grey etc. ; to cut a thread on (a screw). thread and thrum : Good and bad together, all alike. threadbare, a. Worn so that the thread is visible, having the nap worn off ; (fig.) worn, trite, hackneyed. threadbareness, n. thread-mark, n. A mark produced by coloured silk fibres in banknotes to prevent counterfeiting. thread-paper, n. Soft paper for wrapping up thread, thread-worm, n. A thread-like nematode worm, esp. one infesting the rectum of children. threader, n. threadlike, a. and adv. thready, a. threadiness, n.

 

 

THE NEW ELIZABETHAN

REFERENCE DICTIONARY

An up-to-date vocabulary of the living English language

FOURTH EDITION

Circa 1900

Page 1472

thread (thred) [A.-S. thraed, from thrawan, to THROW (cp. Dut. draad, G. draht, Icel. thrathr)], n. A slender cord consisting of two or more yarns doubled or twisted ; a single filament of cotton, silk, wool, etc., esp. Lisle thread ; anything resembling this ; a fine line of colour etc. ; a thin seam or vein ; the spiral on a screw ; (fig.) a continuous course (of life etc.). v.t. To pass a thread through the eye or aperture of ; to string (beads etc.) on a thread ; (fig.) to pick (one's way) or to go through an intricate or crowded place, etc. ; to streak (the hair) with grey etc. ; to cut a thread on (a screw). thread and thrum : Good and bad together, all alike. threadbare, a. Worn so that the thread is visible, having the nap worn off ; (fig.) worn, trite, hackneyed. threadbareness, n. thread-mark, n. A mark produced by coloured silk fibres in banknotes to prevent counterfeiting. thread-paper, n. Soft paper for wrapping up thread, thread-worm, n. A thread-like nematode worm, esp. one infesting the rectum of children. threader, n. threadlike, a. and adv. thready, a. threadiness, n.

 

 

lisle thread: lisle thread

A strong tightly twisted cotton thread (usually made of long-staple cotton) - lisle. Derived forms: lisle threads. Type of: cotton. Nearest ... www.wordwebonline.com/en/LISLETHREAD

 

 

Definition - of Lisle from Dictionary.net

Lisle thread, a hard twisted cotton thread, originally produced at Lisle. Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) ... www.dictionary.net/lisle - 9k

 

 

CASSELL'S ENGLISH DICTIONARY

1974

Lisle thread (lil thred) [ town in France, now Lille], n, A fine, hard thread orig. made at Lille.

 

 

THE GAELIC OTHERWORLD

John Gregorson Campbell's 1900/1902

 

SUPERSTITIONS of the highlands and islands of scotland and witchcraft and second sight

IN THE HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

Edited by Ronald Black 2005

Page 161

THE RED BOOK OF APPIN


This celebrated book contained charms for the cure of cattle, and was so powerful that its owner had to place an iron hoop about his head every time he opened it. All accounts agree that it was got from the devil, but they differ as to how this was done. Very likely the book was a treatise on the treatment and diseases of cattle, and the origin of the stories of its magic virtue lay in the fact that the Stewarts who owned it had a magnificent fold of Highland cattle.554

The first who got the book rode an entire horse (an animal that no evil power can touch) to a meeting of witches.555 The devil wrote in a red book the names of the assembled company. The man, instead of letting the devil write his name, asked to be allowed to do so himself. On getting the book for that purpose he made off with it.

By another account (and the person from whom it was heard was positive as to its being the only correct account) it was got by a young lad under the following circumstances. The youth was apprenticed to the miller at Bearachan on Loch Awe- side. His master was unkind, and made him work more than he was fit for. One night he was up late finishing a piece of work. About midnight a gentleman, whom he did not recognise, entered the mill and accosted him kindly. Turning the conversation that ensued on the harsh conduct of the miller, the stranger promised to better the unhappy prentice's condition if they met at the Cama-Linn (`Crooked Pool') in the Monadh Meadhonach ('Middle Mountain') on a certain night.'556

An assignation to that effect was made, but after the strange gentleman went away the lad got frightened, and next day told about the visitor he had. A conclave of sixteen ministers was called, and the matter was deliberated upon. As the youth had given his promise it was deemed necessary he should keep it, but he was advised to take a wand with him and at the place appointed trace a circle with it round himself, out of which he was not to move,, whatever temptation or terrors the stranger might bring to bear upon him. A committee of the clergy went to watch on a neighbouring eminence the result of the interview.

The strange gentleman came at the appointed hour, and before giving the money promised, civilly asked the lad to write his name in a book. For this purpose the book was not handed but thrown to the youth, and he, on getting it into his possession, refused to give it up again.

The strange gentleman now showed himself in his true colours. Finding remon-/ Page 162 / strances and coaxing of no avail to get the book or the lad out of the circle, he got wild, and tried the effects of terror. First he became a grizzled greyhound (mial-chu riabhach) and came wildly dashing against the circle; then a roaring bull; then a flock of crows (sgaoth rocais) sweeping above the youth, so near that the wind caused by their wings would have carried him out of the circle if he had not clung to the heather.

When cock-crowing time came the devil abandoned his attempts and disappeared. The book became the 'Red Book of Appin', and was last in possession of the Stewarts of Invernahyle (Inbhir na h-Aoile).557

Page 178


A horseshoe was of great power for the protection of cattle against witchcraft. As in England, it must be found by accident. It was put above the byre door, and a nail from it, driven into the lowest hoop (cearcall) of the milk-dish (mias), kept its substance in the milk. It preserved horses when put above the stable door, and ships when nailed to the mast. 606

An entire horse could not be touched by evil spirits, and its rider was safe from the attacks of witchcraft. A person in the neighbourhood of Luing, Argyllshire, returning from a funeral, found himself unable to make any progress on his road home, though he did his utmost all night to get on. He was retarded by some unseen influence. He rode an entire horse, and found himself safe at daybreak. His safety lay in the horse he rode.' 607

The famed 'Red Book of Appin', according to one version of the tale, was got by one who rode an entire horse to a meeting of witches, and having got hold of the book, made off with it in despite of the devil and all his servants. In a West Highland tale (ii., 87), the owner of the 'Red Book' advises the shoe of an entire horse to be nailed on the byre door to counteract the witches who were taking the milk from the cows.'608 The shoes of entire horses probably are the proper kind to use, though others came into use from being found equally efficacious.

 

 

The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, which was one of the events that led up to the Trojan War and (in slightly later versions of the ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judgement_of_Paris

 

THE JUDGEMENT OF PARIS was a contest between the three most beautiful goddesses of Olympos--Aphrodite, Hera and Athena--for the prize of a golden apple ... www.theoi.com/Olympios/JudgementParis.html

 

 

The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, in which the legendary roots of the Trojan War can be found. As with many mythological tales, ... www.mlahanas.de/Greeks/Mythology/JudgsmentOfParis.html

The Judgement of Paris is a story from Greek mythology, in which the legendary roots of the Trojan War can be found. As with many mythological tales, details vary depending on the source. (For a more complete treatment, see Paris)

Zeus (Jupiter) held a banquet in celebration of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis. Left off the guest list was Eris (goddess of discord), and upon turning up uninvited she threw a golden apple on to the table, with the inscription καλλιστι ('for the fairest'). Three goddesses claimed the apple: Hera (Juno), Athena (Minerva) and Aphrodite (Venus). They asked Zeus to judge which of them was fairest, and eventually Zeus declared that Paris, a Phrygian mortal, would judge their cases.

All three of the candidates attempted to bribe Paris; Hera offered to make him king of Europe and Asia, Athena offered skill in wisdom and war, and Aphrodite offered the love of the world's most beautiful woman. This was Helen of Sparta, wife of the Greek king Menelaus. Paris accepted Aphrodite's gift, receiving Helen and the enmity of the Greeks. The Greeks' expedition to retrieve Helen is the borderline mythological basis of the Trojan War.

 

 

Cybele - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia ... and that many a time he cried out evoe saboe, and hyes attes, attes hyes; for these words are in the ritual of Sabazios and the Mother [Rhea]." ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cybele

Aegean Cybele

The worship of Cybele spread from inland areas of Anatolia and Syria to the Aegean coast, to Crete and other Aegean islands, and to mainland Greece. She was particularly welcomed at Athens. The geographer Strabo (book x, 3:18) made some useful observations:

"Just as in all other respects the Athenians continue to be hospitable to things foreign, so also in their worship of the gods; for they welcomed so many of the foreign rites ... the Phrygian [rites of Rhea-Cybele are mentioned] by Demosthenes, when he casts the reproach upon Aeskhines' mother and Aeskhines himself, that he was with her when she conducted initiations, that he joined her in leading the Dionysiac march, and that many a time he cried out evoe saboe, and hyes attes, attes hyes; for these words are in the ritual of Sabazios and the Mother [Rhea]."

 

 

CULT OF KYBELE

Ancient Greek and Phyrgian religion

... he cried out 'evoe saboe,' and 'hyes attes, attes hyes' ; for these words are in the ritual of Sabazios [the Phrygian Dionysos] and the Meter (Mother)." ... www.theoi.com/Cult/KybeleCult.

Strabo, Geography 10. 3. 18 :
"The Phrygia [i.e. the rites of Kybele] [are mentioned] by Demosthenes [Athenian statesman C4th B.C.], when he casts the reproach upon Aiskhines' mother and Aiskhines himself that he was with her when she conducted initiations, that he joined her in leading the Dionysiac march, and that many a time he cried out 'evoe saboe,' and 'hyes attes, attes hyes' ; for these words are in the ritual of Sabazios [the Phrygian Dionysos] and the Meter (Mother)."

 

 

SHEBA CONQUERS KYBELE

Going back again to the Kabeiri shouting of, "evoe saboe," and "'hyes attes," we might translate "evoe," as do many websites, as Eve, but this may not be ... www.tribwatch.com/sheba.htm

"It's interesting that Zagreus was cut into pieces with a knife by Titans (Dedanites?), this having the meaning that a single peoples was scattered in many directions so as to make many branches (and such were the Apiru as per historical documents, clinging to various peoples/rulers wherever they found acceptance). And so I went to a website explaining Zagreus, and when I came across the phrase written by Strabo, "...Aeskhines' mother and Aeskhines himself...", my mind focused in because I had been looking for such a term to describe the Ashkenazi Hebrews of Iran, for it was in Iran that the Ashkenazi Aryans lived, and so I expected that the proto-Kabala Hebrews had mixed with them there. Ashkenaz was the literal brother of Togarmah, and they were literal sons of Gomer (Genesis 10:3), for we can't compare the literal approach of the Bible to the non-literal approach of mythology.

I also noticed the spelling of "Aeskhines," starting with "Aes" as it does, and wondered if the Aesir pantheon of Scandinavia wasn't from this very Hebrew-Aryan mix. I was about to be proven correct within minutes, for immediately afterward, in the same Strabo sentence, there was this that caught my eye : "...when [Aeskhines' mother] conducted initiations, that [Aeskhines] joined her in leading the Dionysiac march, and that many a time he cried out 'evoe saboe,' and 'hyes attes, attes hyes'; for these words are in the ritual of Sabazios [Zagreos] and the Mother... - Strabo, Geography 10.3.18" (Zagreos brackets not mine).

http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Zagreus.html

I stared at that cry. What did it mean. I went searching online to find the meaning because it wasn't given in the article. I couldn't find the translation. But as I stared at the phrase, knowing that "attes" was Attis, it hit me like a ton of bullion that "saboe" was Kybele! And when I saw that Zagreus was the same as Sabazios, it was like when a man searches for pecans under a pecan tree, months after harvest when nuts are scarce, and when he sees one and stoops to pick it up, he looks forward and sees two more, and as he picks them up he looks slightly to the side and sees four more. Then he looks up and sees that he is directly under a pay-load branch that had held its fruit for an extra-ordinary span of time."

 

 

COLLINS ENGLISH GEM DICTIONARY OF THE BIBLE

REV James L. D ow 1964

Page 262

"Israelite. A desc. of Jacob, therefore an heir to the covenant. When Nathaniel is described as ' an Israelite indeed' (John], 47), there is the sense expressed in the 1st ch. of John, 'His own received him not: That was what made Nathaniel exceptional-he did receive the Lord. He was what an Israelite should be.

Issachar [Is'-sa-char]. The 9th son of Jacob (Gen. 30, 18). Jacob did not think very much of him (Gen. 49, 14 & 15). As with all the sons of Jacob he was founder of a tribe or clan, the 5 sub­divisions or septs of it being founded by his sons (Num. 26, 23 & 24). By the reign of David there were 87,000 of them (J Chron. 7, 5). Moses fore­told a peaceful future for them (Deut. 33, 18). After the settlement they were allotted territory / Page 263 / bounded by Zebulon, Naphtali and with the Jordan as their E frontier."

 

 

THUS HAVE I HEARD

 

 

WISDOM OF THE EAST

by Hari Prasad Shastri 1948

Page 8

"There is no such word in Sanscrita as 'Creation' applied to the universe. The Sanscrita word for Creation is Shristi, which means 'projection' Creation means to bring something into being out /Page 9/ of nothing, to create, as a novelist creates a character. There was no Miranda, for example, until Shakespeare created her. Similarly the ancient Indians (this term is innacurately used as there was no India at that time). who were our ancestors long, long ago. used a word for creation that means 'projection'.

 

 

-
SHRISTI
-
-
-
2
SH
27
18
9
1
R
18
9
9
1
I
9
9
9
2
ST
39
12
2
1
I
9
9
9
7
SHRISTI
102
32
14
-
-
7+7
3+2
1+4
7
SHRISTI
14
5
5

 

 

4
GODS
45
18
9
6
SPIRIT
91
37
1
4
ISIS
89
35
8
6
OSIRIS
89
35
8
6
VISHNU
93
30
3
5
SHIVA
59
59
4
7
KRISHNA
80
35
3
7
SHRISTI
102
39
3
5
RISHI
63
36
9
4
ISHI
45
27
9
6
CHRIST
77
32
5

 

 

GODS SPIRIT GODS

ISIS OSIRIS VISHNU SHIVA SHRI KRISHNA SHRISTI RISHI ISHI CHRIST

SING A SONG OF NINES OF NINES A SONG SING

 

 

I SAY ISHI SAY I

I SAY I SAY I

I SAY S+H SAY I

I SAY I SAY I

I SAY ISHI SAY I

I SAY 9 SAY I

I SAY 9 SAY I

I SAY 9 SAY I

I SAY ISHI SAY I

 

 

"His watchmen are all blind: they are ignorant…" (v 10). This verse begins a new section of five verses continuing until chapter 57 v 2 (notwithstanding the ... www.azamra.org/Bible/Isaiah

Avraham Ben Yaakov

 

ISAIAH CHAPTER 55

"Ho all who are thirsty, come to water…" (v 1). "After the war of Gog and Magog the nations will recognize that God rules over all and that there is none beside Him, and then they will come to Jerusalem to learn God's laws and teachings… Water is a metaphor for Torah and wisdom – for just as the world cannot survive without water, so the world cannot survive without wisdom, and just as a thirsty person craves for water, so the wise soul craves for Torah and wisdom… The Torah is also compared to wine and milk. Just as wine makes the heart rejoice, so do words of Torah. And just as milk keeps a baby alive and makes it grow, so words of Torah keep the soul alive and make it grow" (RaDaK ad loc.).

"Why do you spend money for that which is not bread?" (v 2) – "Why should you pay your enemies money without receiving bread?" (Rashi ad loc.) "Why do you pay a high price to study alien systems of wisdom and philosophy that have no benefit?" (Metzudas David ad loc.)

"Hear and your soul shall live" (v 3) – "Listen to Me and you will merit to stand in the resurrection in the days of Mashiach" (Metzudas David ad loc.). "And I will make an everlasting covenant with you, even the sure loving promises of David" (v 3) – "This is Mashiach, for he will be called by the name of David… He will be the teacher of the nations 'and he will judge between the nations and rebuke many peoples' (Is. 2:4)" (RaDaK ad loc.).

"Seek HaShem while He may be found…" (v 6). Isaiah now addresses the people in exile, calling on them to repent. They should seek God "while He may be found" – i.e. "BEFORE the decree is finalized, while He is still telling you to seek Him out" (Rashi). "…while He is NEAR" – "seek Him in such a way that He will be near, i.e. when you seek Him WITH ALL YOUR HEART" (RaDaK). "Seek out the fear of HaShem while you are still alive" (Targum).

"For My thoughts are not as Your thoughts…" (v 8) "My laws are not like the laws of flesh and blood. In your world, if a man admits to a crime he is judged guilty, but by My law, 'Whoever confesses and forsakes [his sins] shall be shown mercy' (Proverbs 28:13)" (Rashi on v 8). "If a man commits an offense against his fellow, he takes vengeance on him and will not forgive him, and even if he forgives him on the surface he nurses a grudge in his heart… But I am full of forgiveness. And when I forgive, I do so in truth, and no trace of the sin remains" (RaDaK on v 8).

"For as the rain comes down… and does not return there but waters the earth…" (v 9) – "The rain and the snow do not return to the skies through evaporation without first watering the earth… Sometimes a person sends someone to do something but the agent comes back without accomplishing his mission. But 'My word… shall not return to Me empty'" (Metzudas David ad loc.).

"For you shall go out with joy…" (v 12). The redemption will bring great joy. Moreover, joy – SIMCHAH – itself is the avenue that leads to redemption. "It is a great mitzvah to be joyful always" (Rabbi Nachman of Breslov).

"Instead of the thorn, the cypress shall arise…" (v 13) – "In place of the wicked, the righteous will rise up" (Rashi ad loc.). The "thorn" and the "nettle" refer to Haman and Vashti, while the "cypress" and the "myrtle refer to Mordechai and Esther (Megillah 10b).

CHAPTER 56

"Guard justice and practice charity, for My salvation is near to come…" (v 1). "Great is charity for it brings the redemption closer" (Bava Kama 10a). "Great is Teshuvah for it brings the redemption closer. Great is charity for it brings salvation closer" (Yoma 87a).

"Happy is the man that does this… that keeps the Sabbath…" (v 2). "The Sabbath is mentioned specifically at this juncture because the prophet is addressing the people in exile, urging them to improve their ways in order to leave their exile, and the best of all pathways is the observance of the Sabbath, while the exile from the land came about because of the transgression of the Sabbath" (RaDaK on v 2). "Whoever observes the Sabbath according to its laws, even if he worshiped idols as in the days of Enosh, he will be forgiven… If Israel kept two Sabbaths according to the law, they would be redeemed immediately" (Shabbos 118b).

"Let not the son of the stranger who has joined himself to HaShem say, HaShem will surely separate me from His people, nor let the eunuch say, Behold I am a dry tree" (v 3). The "son of the stranger" is a convert who does not have children after his conversion; he is similar to a "eunuch" who has no children… Such a convert may think that he will not be considered a member of HaShem's people either in this world or in the world to come, and likewise the childless may think that if he leaves no son after him it is as if he never came into the world and God takes no favor in him, since God created the world for the sake of procreation…" (RaDaK on v 3).

But quite the contrary, God promises that those childless "that will observe My Sabbaths" (=the weekly Sabbaths and the Sabbatical years, RaDaK) will receive "in My House and within My walls (=the Temple in Jerusalem ) a place and a name (YAD VASHEM) better than sons and daughters" (v 5). [The name YAD VASHEM has been given to Israel 's Holocaust Museum in Jerusalem .] Likewise God promises the "children of the stranger" that "I shall bring them to My holy mountain and make them joyful in My House of Prayer…" (v 7). "Just as a person brings a guest into his home and receives him gladly, so God says, I shall command the priests to accept them gladly when they come to convert, and they will rejoice when they see themselves in the Temple courtyard year by year with the people of Israel" (RaDaK).

"For My house shall be called the House of Prayer for all the nations (v 7) – "Not only for Israel alone but also for those of the nations who convert" (see Rashi and Metzudas David ad loc.).

"HaShem God who gathers the outcasts of Israel says, Yet will I gather others to him, besides those of him that are already gathered" (v 8): "I shall gather in more converts to be added to all the ingathered people of Israel " (Metzudas David).

"All you beasts of the field: come into the forest to devour all the beasts thereof" (v 9). "The beasts of the field do not have as much strength as the beasts of the forest. The 'beasts of the field' refers to the gentiles who will not harden their hearts but will convert. They shall 'devour' (win over?) those who harden their hearts and continue their rebellion" (Metzudas David ad loc.).

"His watchmen are all blind: they are ignorant…" (v 10). This verse begins a new section of five verses continuing until chapter 57 v 2 (notwithstanding the conventional chapter break in printed Bibles, which violates the continuity of the Hebrew text).

"After completing the previous prophecy of consolation, the prophet returns to rebuking the wicked people of his generation" (RaDaK on v 10).

"The prophet began by saying, 'Seek out HaShem' (Is. 55:6) but the people do not listen. He therefore now says: See how the prophets are crying to them to repent for their own wellbeing, but their leaders are all like blind men who do not see what is developing. They are like a watcher appointed to see if the sword is approaching in order to warn the people, but he is blind and fails to see the sword coming, dumb and unable to warn the people – like a dog appointed to guard the house but he is dumb and does not bark. Likewise the leaders of Israel fail to warn the people to repent… Just as dogs never know satisfaction, these 'shepherds' do not know or understand what will happen at the end of days… 'Every one is out for his own gain': They rob the rest of the people over whom they are appointed" (Rashi on vv 10-11).

Let us be the ones who hear the call of HaShem in order that our souls shall live!

 

 

I SAY HASHEM SAY I

I SAY H+A SAY I

I SAY S+H SAY I

I SAY E+M SAY I

I SAY HASHEM SAY I

I SAY 9 SAY I

I SAY 9 SAY I

I SAY 9 SAY I

I SAY HASHEM SAY I

 

 

THE HOLY BIBLE

Scofield References

Isaiah Chapter 56

Page 752

10

"His watchmen are blind: they are all ignorant, they are all dumb dogs, they cannot bark; sleeping, lying down, loving to slumber.

11

Yea, they are greedy dogs which can never have enough, and they are shepherds that cannot understand: they all look to their own way, every one for his gain, from his quarter"

 

 

H
=
8
-
3
HIS
36
18
9
W
=
5
-
8
WATCHMEN
87
33
6
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
B
=
2
-
5
BLIND
41
23
5
-
-
16
4
19
First Total
188
89
26
-
-
1+6
-
1+9
Add to Reduce
1+8+8
8+9
2+6
Q
-
7
-
10
Second Total
17
17
8
-
-
-
-
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+7
1+7
-
-
-
7
-
1
Essence of Number
8
8
8

 

 

T
=
2
-
4
THEY
58
22
4
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
I
=
9
-
8
IGNORANT
98
44
8
-
-
13
4
18
First Total
205
88
25
-
-
1+3
-
1+8
Add to Reduce
2+0+5
8+8
2+5
Q
-
4
-
9
Second Total
7
16
7
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
1+6
-
-
-
4
-
9
Essence of Number
7
7
7

 

 

T
=
2
-
4
THEY
58
22
4
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
D
=
4
-
4
DUMB
40
13
4
D
=
4
-
4
DOGS
45
18
9
-
-
12
4
18
First Total
192
75
30
-
-
1+2
-
1+8
Add to Reduce
1+9+2
7+5
3+0
Q
-
3
-
9
Second Total
12
12
3
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+2
1+2
-
-
-
3
-
9
Essence of Number
3
3
3

 

 

T
=
2
-
4
THEY
58
22
4
C
=
3
-
6
CANNOT
67
22
4
B
=
2
-
4
BARK
32
14
5
-
-
7
4
14
First Total
157
58
13
-
-
-
-
1+4
Add to Reduce
1+5+7
5+8
1+3
Q
-
7
-
5
Second Total
13
13
4
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+3
1+3
-
-
-
7
-
5
Essence of Number
4
4
4

 

 

S
=
1
-
8
SLEEPING
87
42
6
L
=
3
-
5
LYING
67
31
4
D
=
4
-
4
DOWN
56
20
2
-
-
8
4
17
First Total
210
93
12
-
-
-
-
1+7
Add to Reduce
2+1+0
9+3
1+2
Q
-
8
-
8
Second Total
3
12
3
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
1+2
-
-
-
8
-
8
Essence of Number
3
3
3

 

 

L
=
3
-
6
LOVING
79
34
7
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
S
=
1
-
7
SLUMBER
90
27
9
-
-
6
4
15
First Total
204
69
24
-
-
-
-
1+5
Add to Reduce
2+0+4
6+9
2+4
Q
-
6
-
6
Second Total
6
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
1+5
-
-
-
6
-
6
Essence of Number
6
6
6

 

 

H
=
8
-
3
HIS
36
18
9
W
=
5
-
8
WATCHMEN
87
33
6
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
B
=
2
-
5
BLIND
41
23
5
T
=
2
-
4
THEY
58
22
4
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
I
=
9
-
8
IGNORANT
98
44
8
T
=
2
-
4
THEY
58
22
4
A
=
1
-
3
ARE
24
15
6
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
D
=
4
-
4
DUMB
40
13
4
D
=
4
-
4
DOGS
45
18
9
T
=
2
-
4
THEY
58
22
4
C
=
3
-
6
CANNOT
67
22
4
B
=
2
-
4
BARK
32
14
5
S
=
1
-
8
SLEEPING
87
42
6
L
=
3
-
5
LYING
67
31
4
D
=
4
-
4
DOWN
56
20
2
L
=
3
-
6
LOVING
79
34
7
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
S
=
1
-
7
SLUMBER
90
27
9
-
-
62
4
101
First Total
1156
472
130
-
-
6+2
-
1+0+1
Add to Reduce
1+1+5+6
4+7+2
1+3+0
Q
-
8
-
2
Second Total
13
13
4
-
-
-
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+3
1+3
-
-
-
8
-
2
Essence of Number
4
4
4

 

 

THE HOLY BIBLE

Scofield References

Isaiah Chapter 6

Page 718

In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the LORD sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple.

2

Above it stood the seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly.

3

And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.

4

And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the house was filled with smoke.

5

Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.

6

Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar:

7

And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.

8

Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.

9

And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not.

10

Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.

11

Then said I, Lord, how long? And he answered, Until the cities be wasted without inhabitant, and the houses without man, and the land be utterly desolate,

12

And the LORD have removed men far away, and there be a great forsaking in the midst of the land.

13

But yet in it shall be a tenth, and it shall return, and shall be eaten: as a teil tree, and as an oak, whose substance is in them, when they cast their leaves: so the holy seed shall be the substance thereof.

H
=
8
-
4
HOLY
60
24
6
H
=
8
-
4
HOLY
60
24
6
H
=
8
-
4
HOLY
60
24
6
-
-
24
4
12
Add to Reduce
180
72
18
-
-
2+4
-
1+2
Reduce to Deduce
1+8+0
7+2
1+8
Q
-
6
-
3
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

THE HOLY BIBLE

Scofield References

Isaiah Chapter 6

Page 718

3

"And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory."

6

Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar:

7

And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.

8

Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.

 

 

IS EL RA RA IS EL

GOD IS REAL REALITY REVEALED REALITY REAL IS GOD

 

 

Names of God in Judaism - Wikepedia, the free encyclopedia

"I am that I am" (Hebrew: אהיה אשר אהיה, pronounced Ehyeh asher ehyeh) is the ... Ehyeh asher ehyeh is generally interpreted to mean "I will be what I will ...en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_God_in_Judaism

Ehyeh-Asher-Ehyeh

The name Ehyeh (Hebrew: אֶהְיֶה) denotes God's potency in the immediate future, and is part of YHWH. The phrase "ehyeh-asher-ehyeh" (Exodus) 3:14) is interpreted by some authorities as "I will be because I will be", using the second part as a gloss and referring to God's promise, "Certainly I will be [ehyeh] with thee" (Exodus 3:12). Other authorities claim that the whole phrase forms one name. The Targum Onkelos leaves the phrase untranslated and is so quoted in the Talmud (B. B. 73a). The "I am that I am" of the Authorised Version is based on this view.

"I am that I am" (Hebrew: אהיה אשר אהיה, pronounced Ehyeh asher ehyeh) is the sole response used in (Exodus 3:14) when Moses asked for God's name. It is one of the most famous verses in the Hebrew Bible. Hayah means "existed" or "was" in Hebrew; ehyeh is the first-person singular imperfect form. Ehyeh asher ehyeh is generally interpreted to mean "I will be what I will be", I shall be what I shall be or I am that I am (King James Bible and others). The Tetragrammaton itself may derive from the same verbal root.

HASHEM

Jewish Law requires that secondary rules be placed around the primary law, to reduce the chance that the main law will be broken. As such, it is common Jewish practice to restrict the use of the word Adonai to prayer only. In conversation, many Jewish people will call God "Hashem", which is Hebrew for "the Name" (this appears in Leviticus 24:11). Many Jews extend this prohibition to some of the other names listed below, and will add additional sounds to alter the pronunciation of a name when using it outside of a liturgical context, such as kel or elokim.

While other names of God in Judaism are generally restricted to use in a Liturgicalcontext, Hashem is used in more casual circumstances. Hashem is used by Orthodox Jews so as to avoid saying Adonai outside of a ritual context. For example, when Orthodox Jews make audio recordingsof prayer services, they generally substitute Hashem for Adonai--for example, this pattern is used during all prayers in the movie Ushpizin.

 

 

-
HASHEM
-
-
-
2
H+A
9
9
9
2
S+H
27
18
9
2
E+M
18
9
9
6
HASHEM
54
36
27
-
-
5+4
3+6
2+7
6
HASHEM
9
9
9

 

 

6
H
A
S
H
E
M
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
1
=
5
=
5
-
8
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
2
=
16
1+6
7
6
H
A
S
H
E
M
-
-
18
-
-
7
-
27
-
18

 

 

W
=
5
-
8
WEPWAWET
116
35
8
O
=
6
-
6
OPENER
73
37
1
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
4
WAYS
68
14
5
-
-
24
4
23
Add to Reduce
311
113
23
-
-
2+4
-
2+3
Reduce to Deduce
3+1+1
1+1+3
2+3
-
-
6
-
5
Essence of Number
5
5
5

 

 

-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
WEPWAWET
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
-
W
23
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
-
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
-
P
16
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
W
=
5
-
-
W
23
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
-
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
-
W
23
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
-
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
-
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
WEPWAWET
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
OPENER
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
-
O
15
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
P
=
7
-
-
P
16
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
E
=
5
-
-
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
N
=
5
-
-
N
14
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
E
=
5
-
-
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
R
=
9
-
-
R
18
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
6
OPENER
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
OF
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
O
=
6
-
-
O
16
15
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
F
=
6
-
-
F
6
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
OF
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
THE
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
-
T
20
2
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
H
=
8
-
-
H
8
8
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
E
=
5
-
-
E
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THE
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
WAYS
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
W
=
5
-
-
W
23
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
-
A
1
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Y
=
7
-
-
Y
25
7
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
S
=
1
-
-
S
19
1
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
WAYS
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
23
4
23
ADD
311
113
23
4
3
4
-
-
50
18
21
8
9
-
-
2+3
-
2+3
REDUCE
3+1+1
1+1+3
2+3
-
-
-
-
-
5+0
1+8
2+1
-
-
-
5
-
5
DEDUCE
5
5
5
-
3
4
-
-
5
9
3
8
9

 

 

MAGI THE MAGIC SEE THE MAGI

C

THE

MAGIC

ART THOU MAGI THE MAGIC MAGI THE MAGIC AM I

 

-
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
-
14
14
-
-
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
5
-
-
5
1
+
=
11
1+1
=
2
=
2
=
2
-
`-
5
-
-
5
1
+
=
11
1+1
=
2
=
2
=
2
-
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
5
14
14
5
1
+
=
39
3+9
=
12
1+2
3
=
3
-
-
5
5
5
5
1
+
=
21
2+1
=
3
=
3
=
3
-
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
TWO
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
4
=
20
2+0
2
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
SIX
2
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
3
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
8
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
2
-
-
-
-
-
39
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
21
-
3
3+9
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+1
-
-
12
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
3
-
3
1+2
-
5
5
5
5
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
3
-
3

 

 

5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
14
14
-
-
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
5
-
-
5
1
+
=
11
1+1
=
2
=
2
=
2
`-
5
-
-
5
1
+
=
11
1+1
=
2
=
2
=
2
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
`-
5
14
14
5
1
+
=
39
3+9
=
12
1+2
3
=
3
-
5
5
5
5
1
+
=
21
2+1
=
3
=
3
=
3
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
4
=
20
2+0
2
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
21
-
3
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2+1
-
-
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
3
-
3
-
5
5
5
5
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
3
-
3

 

 

-
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
-
14
14
-
-
-
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
-
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
14
14
5
1
4
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
+
=
25
2+5
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
TWO
2
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
4
=
20
2+0
2
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
SIX
2
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
3
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
EIGHT
2
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
3
-
-
-
-
-
35
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
10
-
-
6
-
25
-
7
3+5
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
-
2+5
-
-
8
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
7
-
-
6
-
7
-
7
-
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
8
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
7
-
-
6
-
7
-
7

 

THE FIVES HAVE IT HAVE IT HAVE THE FIVES

 

E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
+
=
10
1+0
=
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
14
14
-
-
-
+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
1
=
1
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
=
6
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
15
1+5
=
6
=
6
=
6
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
14
14
5
1
4
+
=
43
4+3
=
7
=
7
=
7
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
+
=
25
2+5
=
7
=
7
=
7
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
4
=
20
2+0
2
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
10
-
-
6
-
25
-
7
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
1+0
-
-
-
-
2+5
-
-
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
7
-
-
6
-
7
-
7
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
6
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
7
-
-
6
-
7
-
7

 

 

-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
+
=
18
1+8
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
14
14
-
-
-
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
22
2+2
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
20
-
5
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
`-
20
8
5
-
5
14
14
5
1
4
+
=
76
7+6
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
5
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
5
=
25
2+5
7
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
SIX
2
-
-
-
-
-
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
SEVEN
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
NINE
2
-
-
-
-
-
25
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
20
-
-
9
-
40
-
22
2+5
-
-
-
5
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
2+0
-
-
-
-
4+0
-
2+2
7
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
2
-
-
9
-
4
-
4
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
2
-
-
9
-
4
-
4

 

 

-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
-
+
=
18
1+8
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
14
14
-
-
-
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
22
2+2
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
20
-
5
-
5
-
-
5
1
4
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
`-
20
8
5
-
5
14
14
5
1
4
+
=
76
7+6
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
+
=
40
4+0
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
5
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
5
=
25
2+5
7
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
occurs
x
1
=
8
-
8
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
25
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
20
-
-
9
-
40
-
22
2+5
-
-
-
5
-
5
5
5
5
-
-
-
-
2+0
-
-
-
-
4+0
-
2+2
7
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
2
-
-
9
-
4
-
4
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
5
5
5
1
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
7
9
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
D
-
-
2
-
-
9
-
4
-
4

 

 

-
8
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
5
5
-
-
+
=
18
1+8
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
14
14
-
-
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
8
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
2
-
5
-
5
-
-
5
1
+
=
18
1+8
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
`-
20
-
5
-
5
-
-
5
1
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
8
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
`-
20
8
5
-
5
14
14
5
1
+
=
72
7+2
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
-
2
8
5
-
5
5
5
5
1
+
=
36
3+6
=
9
=
9
=
9
-
8
T
H
E
-
E
N
N
E
A
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
occurs
x
1
=
1
=
1
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
occurs
x
1
=
2
=
2
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
THREE
3
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
FOUR
2
-
-