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SECRETS OF THE CODE

The Unauthorised Guide to the Mysteries Behind The Da Vinci Code

Edited By Dan Bursten

SECRET SOCIETIES

Page 178

" Granted, Guillaume [de Tyre] does provide us with certain basic information, and it is this information on which all subsequent accounts of the Templars, all explanation of their foundation, all narratives of their activities have been based. But because of Guillaume's vagueness and sketchiness, because of the time at which he was writing [1175-85], because of the dearth of documented sources, he constitutes a precarious basis on which to build a definitive picture. Guillaume's chronicles are certainly useful. But it is a mistake-and one to which many historians have succumbed-to regard them as unimpugnable and wholly accurate. Even Guillaume's dates, as Sir Steven Runciman stresses, "are confused and at times demonstrably wrong."1

According to Guillaume de Tyre the Order of the Poor Knights of Christ and the Temple of Solomon was founded in 1118. Its founder is said to be one Hugues de Payen, a nobleman from Champagne and vassal of the count of Champagne. One day Hugues, unsolicited, presented himself with eight comrades at the palace of Baudouin 1, king of Jerusalem, whose elder brother, Godfroi de Bouillon, had captured the Holy City nineteen years earlier. Baudouin seems to have received them most cordially, as did the patriarch of Jerusalem-the religious leader of the new kingdom and special emissary of the Pope.
The declared objective of the Templars, Guillaume de Tyre continues, was, "as far as their strength permitted, they should keep the roads and highways safe. . . with especial regard for the protection of pilgrims."2 So worthy was this objective apparently that the king vacated an entire wing of the royal palace and placed it at the knights' disposal. And despite their declared oath of poverty the knights moved mto this lavish accommodation. According to tradition their quarters were built on the foundations of the ancient temple of Solomon, and from this the fledgling order derived its name.
For nine years, Guillaume de Tyre tells us, the nine knights admitted no new candidates to their order. They were still supposed to be living in poverty-such poverty that official seals show two knights riding a single horse, implying not / Page 179 / only brotherhood, but also a penury that precluded separate mounts. This style of seal is often regarded as the most famous and distinctive of Templar devices, descending from the first days of the order. However, it actually dates from a full century later, when the Templars were hardly poor-if; indeed, they ever were.
According to Guillaume de Tyre, writing a half century later, the Templars were established in 1118 and moved into the king's palace-presumably sallying out from there to protect pilgrims on the Holy Land's highways and byways. And yet there was at the time an official royal historian employed by the king. His name was Fulk de Chartres, and he was writing not fifty years after the order's purported foundation, but during the very years in question. Curiously enough, Fulk de Chartres makes no mention whatever of Hugues de Payen, Hugues' companions, or anything even remotely connected with the Knights Templar. Indeed, there is a thunderous silence about Templar activities during the early days of their existence. Certainly there is no record anywhere-not even later-of their doing anything to protect pilgrims. And one cannot but wonder how so few men could hope to fulfill so mammoth a self-imposed task. Nine men to protect the pilgrims on all the thoroughfares of the Holy Land? Only nine? And all pilgrims? If this was their objective, one would surely expect them to welcome new recruits. Yet according to Guillaume de Tyre, they admitted no new candidates to the order for nine years.
Nonetheless, within a decade the Templars' fame seems to have spread back to Europe. Ecclesiastical authorities spoke highly of them and extolled their Christian undertaking. By 1128 or shortly thereafter, a tract lauding their virtues and qualities was issued by no less a person than Saint Bernard, abbot of Clairvaux and the age's chief spokesman for Christendom. Bernard's tract, "In Praise of the New Knighthood," declares the Templars to be the epitome and apotheosis of Christian values.
After nine years, in 1127, most of the nine knights returned to Europe and a triumphal welcome, orchestrated in large part by Saint Bernard. In January 1128 a Church council was convened at Troyes-court of the count of Champagne, Hugues de Payen's liege Lord-at which Bernard was again the guiding spirit. At this council the Templars were officially recognized and incorporated as a religious-military order. Hugues de Payen was given the title of grand master. He and his subordinates were to be warrior-monks, soldier-mystics, combining the austere discipline of the cloister with a martial zeal tantamount to fanaticism-a "militia of Christ" as they were called at the time. And it was again Saint Bernard
who helped to draw up, with an enthusiastic preface, the rule of conduct to which the knights would adhere-a rule based on that of the Cistercian monastic order, in which Bernard himself was a dominant influence.
The Templars were sworn to poverty, chastity, and obedience. They were obliged to cut their hair but forbidden to cut their beards, thus distinguishing themselves in an age when most men were cleanshaven. Diet, dress, and other as­peers of daily life were stringently regulated in accordance with both monastic and / Page 180 / Military routines.

Page 178. 1Runciman, History of the Crusades, Vo1. 2. p. 477.
2 William of Tyre, History of Deeds Done Beyond the Sea, Sea, Vol. 1 p. 525ff.

Page 178

"One day Hugues, unsolicited, presented himself with eight comrades at the palace of Baudouin 1, king of Jerusalem"

"For nine years, Guillaume de Tyre tells us, the nine knights admitted no new candidates to their order"

 

Page 179

"Nine men to protect the pilgrims on all the thoroughfares of the Holy Land? Only nine? And all pilgrims? If this was their objective, one would surely expect them to welcome new recruits. Yet according to Guillaume de Tyre, they admitted no new candidates to the order for nine years."

"After nine years, in 1127, most of the nine knights returned to Europe and a triumphal welcome"

 

 

OUT OF ZERO COMETH ONE

OUT

OF

NOTHINGNESS

I

HAVE

COME

THAT ME THAT

I

AM

 

 

 

WATCHING THE TREE

Adeline Yen Mah 2000

A Chinese daughter reflects on happiness spiritual beliefs and universal wisdom

Page 156

..." Turn your paper around and look at the word che from a different angle. Does it not look like a cart with a wheel on each side and an axle running down the middle?
'In future, when you look at any Chinese word, keep in mind the phrase Zi xing cang li (Chinese symbols omitted) (Hidden logic within the shape of words). Li means logic, reason, truth and principle. Dissect each word and search for the li represented by the characters.
'For example, how we Chinese regard the ant might be seen by looking at the word for "ant" (omitted) (yi). On the left is (omitted) which means "insect". On the right is (omitted) which means "justice, loyalty, relationship and unselfishness".'
Of all the animals, only we humans are endowed with the ability to communicate through language. Described by philosophers as a 'mirror of man's mind', language reflects the essence of our perceptions and concepts. We use it to clarify our thoughts, feelings or ideas and express them to others.
Ideas define how we perceive reality. At first glance, having ideas may seem to be a natural function separate from the domain of language. Indeed, in some instances, it is. Although it is mainly through words that we express our ideas, it is by no means the only way.
Emotional and spiritual concepts are probably best conveyed by music, art, meditation or physical disciplines such as dance, qi gong, tai chi or yoga. A skilful artist is able to erase the boundary between observation, feeling and expression, thereby creating a conduit directly to the mind of the beholder.

Page 156

Ideas in mathematics, however, are better interpreted by a special numerical 'alphabet' that is able to represent an infinite variety of concepts with a small and simple assemblage of symbols. Galileo wrote,

Philosophy is written in that great book which ever lies before our eyes - I mean the universe. But we cannot understand it [the universe 1 if we do not first learn the languagc and grasp the symbols in which it is written. This book [of the universe] is written in the mathematical language, and the symbols are triangles, circles, and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word of it, without which one wanders in vain through a dark labyrinth

The way in which we think - and the degree of sophistication of the culture we create - is highly dependent on our vocabulary. The importance of mathematics in the development of science was recognised by the Chincse only relatively recently, and the Hindu-Arabic number system was not adopted or taught at schools in China until the twentieth century. Yet according to Lconardo da Vinci, 'a science is perfect to the degree that it is mathcmatical'. In the 1880s, when my grandfather was a boy, numbers were still being written in Chinese characters with a brush. Besides being cumbersome and time-consuming, the traditional Chinese method of recording numbers lacked two vital components: positional value and the symbol zero.

When my son Roger was seven years old, I gave him a record called Multiplication Rock, which he loved. Morning, noon and night he would play it over and ovcr, driving our whole / Page 157 / family crazy with the same tunes, same beat, same words. One of the songs was named 'My Hero Zero'. It went something like this:

My hero Zero,
When you stand to the right of the number one
The number becomes ten
;
When you stand to the right of the number ten
The number beeomes one hundred
;
When you stand to the right of the number one hundred The number becomes one thousand.

Roger loved the song so much that, for his eighth birthday, I wrote him a short story featuring his hero Zero (dressed in a bright red military uniform) coming to the rescue of all the other nine numbers which had moeked and belittled him for being of no value.
In a way, this story symbolises the reason why China fell behind the west in mathematics and science. The symbol zero,
invented in India in the ninth century and adopted as part of the Hindu-Arabic number system, is indeed very much a hero. However, zero's value was never truly recognized by my Chinese ancestors before the twentieth century.
For one thing, zero is different from any other number. Like the mysterious, ineffable tao in Lao Zi's Tao Te Ching, zero

. . . resembles an empty bowl

Which, while being used, can never be filled.

Bottomless, it seems to be the source of everything.

Blunting all sharpness, / Page 58 /

Unravelling all complications,

Harmonising all glare,

Uniting the world into common dust.

Hidden and invisible,

Yet it appears to exist.

I know not whose offspring it is;

It looks like the ancestor of all.

Before its invention, zero played a hidden role as a blank space on the abacus. Its incarnation as a symbol (and its establishment as a place-holder) is what gave zero its unique power aud status. I have been fascinated by zero ever sincc I studied it as a schoolgirl in Hong Kong. Trying to discover the logic hidden within its shape (zi xing cang li), [ became bewitched and enchanted. I was taught that adding a number to zero or subtracting zero from a number changcd nothing. In such cases, zero counted for naught. however, any number multiplied by zero became zero itself, whereas any number divided by zero became infinity. I remember being thrilled by zero's paradoxical powers, seemingly so insignificant. To me at the age of twelve, zero and infinity, like yin and yang, or nothing and eternity, appeared to represent the two opposite ends of the universe. Between them, they held all the secrets of a magical world.
My feelings towards zero have not changed over the years. Like the tao, zero will always remain enigmatic and beautiful.
Indian astronomical tables were first translated into Arabic in Baghdad and later into Latin. The great scholar and intellectual Pope Silvester II (who was pontiff for only four years. from AD 999 to 1003 was one of tbe earliest proponents of these numbers. but it was Leonardo Fibonacci of Pisa (1170-1230) who, in his book Liber Abace. first pointed out zero's / Page 160 / unique significance. He also noted that the ten Hindu-Arabic numbers (987654321 and zero) possess the ability to express an infinite variety of numbers.
Four centuries later. Leibniz. while reading the I Ching. recognised that instead of using ten numbers. any number can also be written by using only zero and 1. This is the binary (base 2) system of mathematics that is used in computers today. To Leibniz. one stood for God. zero stood for the void and binary mathematics symbolised the creation of the universe out of nothing (Creation ex nihila). In 1703 he published an article in the French Academy of Sciences discussing the relationship between binary mathematics and the I Ching. His correspondence with the Jesuit missionaries Bouvet. Foucquet and Gaubil showed an intense desire to learn from Chinese thought and philosophy.
The advantages of using Hindu-Arabic numerals were so manifest that they gradually replaced all other number systems. They have now been accepted internationally as the basic 'alphabet' in the language of mathematics, called by some the 'one and only truly universal language' . Though the same numbers and mathematical symbols are pronounced differently in different countries, their meanings remain the same throughout the world. This has greatly facilitated the advancement and exchange of scientific knowledge.
As mentioned before. the invention of zero simultaneously introduced the other key concept that produced such a revol­ution in mathematical thought. That concept is known as 'position'.
The great eighteenth-century mathematician Laplace said of position, 'The idea is so simple that this very simplicity is the reason for our not being sulliciently aware how much admiration it deserves.'
160

unique significance. He also noted that the ten Hindu-Arabic numbers (987654321 and zero) possess the ability to express an infinite variety of numbers.
Four centuries later, Leibniz, while reading the I Ching, recognised that, instead of using ten numbers, any number can also be written by using only zero and 1. This is the binary (base 2) system of mathematics that is used in com­puters today. To Leibniz, one stood for God, zero stood for the void and binary mathematics symbolised the creation of the universe out of nothing (Creation ex nibilo). In 1703 he published an article in the French Academy of Sciences dis­cussing the relationship between binary mathematics and the I Chiny, His correspondence with the Jesuit missionaries Bouvet, Foucquet and Gaubil showed an intense desire to learn from Chinese thought and philosophy,
The advantages of using Hindu-Arabic numerals were so manifest that they gradually replaced all other number systems. They have now been accepted internationally as the basic 'alphabet' in the language of mathematics, called by some the 'one and only truly universal language'. Though the same numbers and mathematical symbols are pronounced differently in different countries, their meanings remain the same throughout the world. This has greatly facilitated the advancement and exchange of scientific knowledge.
As mentioned before. the invention of zero simultaneously introduced the other key concept that produced such a revol­ution in mathematical thought. That concept is known as 'position' .
The great eighteenth-century mathematician Laplace said of position, 'The idea is so simple that this very simplicity is the reason for our not being sufficiently aware how much admiration it deserves,'

Page 160

These two inventions (positional value of a digit and the symbol for zero) are considered by many to be among the most important developments in mathematics in the last 3000 years. Zero allows every number to be put in its rightful place. The number 2 in front of three zeros (2000) has an entirely difTerent value from the same number 2 in front of six (2.000,000) or nine (2,000,000,000) zeros. Each given number could be considered to have two values: a fundamen­tal value indicated by the isolated numeral itself. and a place value dependent on the numeral's location within the sequence of digits used to express a particular number.
China invented the abacus (swm pal! ~~) or counting board in the sixth century BC and continued to use it for the next 2500 years. There is an implied understanding of both positional value and the concept of zero whenever a number is 'registered' on the abacus. For instance, the number lOO}
involves placing a single disc in the fourth box from the right, leaving the third and second boxes empty to signify zeros. and putting another single disc in the first box. However. when this same number was written down as Chinese charac­ters, it was transcribed as yi qial! yi - 'f - (onc thousand one).
But like old Roman numerals. the three words yi (lian yi possess neither place value nor the symbol for zero. This meant that Chinese mathematicians were unable to transpose numbers on to paper quickly and easily for accurate calcu­lation. Mathematical thought lacked an adequate alphabet for expression. progression or development. As a result, calcu­lus was never invented, the development of science was hin­dered and China fell behind the west in technology.*
. Note: According to Robert Temple in Tile Cm;us of CIIi/1lI (l9X6), the zero symhol orst appeared in print in China in 1247. However. the Chinese were secretive and seldom puhlished their work. It was also traditional not to reveal step-by-step calculations in solving mathematical problems.
J61

If one compares the writings of Marco Polo (1254-1324), describing the Yuan dynasty, with those of Matteo Ricci (1552-1610), who was in China during the Ming dynasty,
the differences are astonishing. Marco Polo's The Book of
Marco Polo is tilled with the might, power and marvels (print­ing, paper money, grand canals) of a rich and amazingly advanced country, while Matteo Ricc!' s China in the Sixteenth Century describes a nation ignorant of physics, geometry and astronomy; one whose people suffered from illiteracy and superstition and practised foot-binding and female infanticide. Far from being in awe of his host-country, Ricci was attracting potential converts (including some of the best and brightest scholar-mandarins) by dazzling them with Euro­pean clocks, prisms, telescopes, globes, maps, paintings and books on mathematics and astronomy. In a period of less than 300 years the west had caught up with and surpassed China in science and technology.
During the summer of 1951, when I was thirteen, my stepmother allowed me to come home for a few days to recuperate from pnellmonia (see page 9°). My brother James had just escaped from China to Hong Kong and was sharing a room with my grandfather. They placed a eot bebNeen their two beds and the three of us would talk deep into the night, with Jamcs and me bombarding Ye Ye with questions about his past. His life as a boy in the city of Nantao, Shanghai, during the Qing dynasty fascinated me.
'V/hat was it like, wearing a queue?' I asked one night.
'My older brothers used to tease me by tying my queue to
a bed post when I was sleeping. I always hated my hairstyle but the queue was mandated by the Qing emperors and dis­
162

obedicnce meant dcath by bchcading. The only permitted ;dlcrnativc was to shave off all the hair on my head and I soon did so.'
'What was Father like as a young man?' James said.
'He was so intelligent! I remember when he first joined my
finn, Hwa Chong Hong, at eighteen. He had just come to Tianjin from Shanghai and was with us for barely three months when our boss, K. C. Li, called me into his office. "This son of yours is rcally something!" he exclaimed. "In less than three months he has already cleared up our messy accounts and caught the thief in our midst."
'In those days, accounts werc added, subtracted, multiplied or dividcd only by nsing the abacus. ':' Now the abacus is a wonderful instrument, but there is no written record of the steps a person goes throngh in arriving at his final number. In fact, it is traditional in China not to write down the sequence of calculations one goes through in solving mathcmatical prob­lems. What your father did was to teach everyone the foreigners' number system and insist that everyone write down his calculations on paper one step at a time.
'For over two thousand years additions, subtractions, multi­plications and divisions involving large numbers could only be carried out on the abacus because written Chinese numbers contain neithcr zcro nor position. After learning the Hindu­Arabic numbers, young c1erks at our firm were successfully challenging traditional abacists [those using the abacus] in their daily calculations. Not only were they fast and accurate, these
, It is possible, but highly cumbersome. to do mathematical calculations on paper while using Chinese characters alone. Until the adoption of the Hindu-Arabic number system. almost all calculations were carried out on the abacus in China out of necessity. not preference.
163

 

 

THE

I

CHANGING

I

CHING

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Wednesday, April 26, 2006

By Ben Taylor and Ian Drury

Page35

"Despite five 999 calls, police took 90 minutes. . . "

"Police took an hour and and a half to react to 999 calls. . ."

"In the 90 minutes. . . "

"90 minutes earlier on Friday night when the first in a series of 999 calls was made. . ."

"One 999 caller claimed. . . "

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Friday, January 20, 2006

By Steve Doughty

Page 13

"Nine in ten"

"More than nine out of ten. . ."

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Friday, January 20, 2006

By David Wilkes and Andre Levy

Page 31

"90 years on, love letters of soldier's sweetheart have a happy ending"

 

 

UNITARIAN CHURCH

WAKEFIELD

"William Thomas Marriot of Sandal Grove"

"Died February 2nd 1899"

 

 

WAKEFIELD MUSEUM

DISCOVERING ANCIENT EGYPT

23rd September 05 - 23rd April 06

Scientific American

updated from the 1996 issue

Page 68

Daily Life in Ancient Egypt

Andre G Mc Dowell

"Workmen and their families lived some 3000 years ago in the village now known as

Deir el Medina

 

 

-
DEIR EL MEDINA
-
-
-
-
DE
9
9
9
-
I
9
9
9
-
R
18
9
9
-
EL
17
8
8
-
ME
18
9
9
-
D
4
4
4
-
I
9
9
9
-
NA
15
6
6
12
DEIR EL MEDINA
99
63
63
1+2
-
9+9
6+3
6+3
3
DEIR EL MEDINA
18
9
9
-
-
1+8
-
-
3
DEIR EL MEDINA
9
9
9

 

 

-
DEIR EL MEDINA
-
-
-
-
DE
9
9
9
-
I
9
9
9
-
R
18
9
9
-
EL
17
8
8
-
ME
18
9
9
-
DINA
28
19
1
12
DEIR EL MEDINA
99
63
45
1+2
-
9+9
6+3
4+5
3
DEIR EL MEDINA
18
9
9
-
-
1+8
-
-
3
DEIR EL MEDINA
9
9
9

 

 

-
DEIR EL MEDINA
-
-
-
-
DEIR
36
27
9
-
EL
17
8
8
-
MEDINA
46
28
1
12
DEIR EL MEDINA
99
63
18
1+2
-
9+9
6+3
4+5
3
DEIR EL MEDINA
18
9
9
-
-
1+8
-
-
3
DEIR EL MEDINA
9
9
9

 

 

Definition of deeded in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of deeded. What does deeded mean? deeded synonyms, deeded antonyms. Information about deeded in the ...
www.thefreedictionary.com/deeded

1. Something that is carried out; an act or action.
2. A usually praiseworthy act; a feat or exploit.
3. Action or performance in general: Deeds, not words, matter most.
4. Law A document sealed as an instrument of bond, contract, or conveyance, especially relating to property.
tr.v. deed·ed, deed·ing, deeds
To transfer by means of a deed: deeded the property to the children.

 

 

DAILY MAIL

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Pages 32/33

MIND YOUR LANGUAGE

Page 32

"Do you remember learning your ABCs? As children we are taught to recite the alphabet forwards backwards and inside out. Twenty six letters which can be arranged in upwards of half a million combinations, many seemingly random, to form the basis of the English language."

Page 33

"Only word comprising two letters used three times: Deeded"

 

 

No curved lines - A.E.F.H.I.K.L.M.N.T.V.W.X.Y.Z.

No straight lines-C.O.S.

No enclosed areas-C.E.F.G.H.I.J.K.L.M.N.S.T.U.V.W.X.Y.Z.

Horizontal symmetry-B.C.D.E.H.I.K.O.X.

Vertical symmetry-A.H.I.M.O.T.U.V.W.X.Y.

Roman numerals-C.D.I.L.M.V.X.

Just dots in Morse code-E.H.I.S. Just dashes in Morse code-M.O.T.

Horizontal and vertical symmetry-H.I.O.X.

Look the same upside down-H.I.N.O.S.X.Z.

Can be drawn in one stroke-B.C.D.G.I.J.L.M.N.O.P.R.S.U.V.W.Z.

Capitals which look like lowercase-C.O.P.S.U.V.W.X.Z.

 

 

Daily Mail

Thursday, June 11 2009

Page 37

Web 2.0 - the one millionth English word

ALMOST 1,500 years after it was first recorded, the English language has its one millionth word.

At 10.22am yesterday Web 2.0 - describing the next generation of internet services entered the dictionary.

To be accepted a word must be used at least 25,000 times across national boundaries and outside specialisms.

U.S-based Global Language Monitor surveys print publications, online news sites, blogs and social media for useage.

Jai Ho!, a Hindi phrase signifying the joy of victory became the 999,999th word thanks to the Oscar-Winning film Slumdog millionaire.

At 1,000,001 is Financial Tsunami - a sudden financial restructuring.

 

 

"JAI HO! A HINDI PHRASE SIGNIFYING THE JOY OF VICTORY BECAME THE 999,999TH WORD..."

 

 

FIRST CONTACT

STAR TREK

A novel by J.M. Dillard based on the film

STAR TREK; FIRST CONTACT

Story by Rick Berman & Brannon Braga & Ronald D. Moore

Screenplay by Brannon Braga & Ronald D. Moore

1996

First

STAR TREK

FIRST CONTACT

Second

STAR TREK

FIRST CONTACT

This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, places and incidents are products of the author's imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

Third

STAR TREK

FIRST CONTACT

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki_HaTorah

Aish HaTorah ("Fire of the Torah") is an Orthodox Jewish outreach organization and yeshiva. The organization's stated mission is "providing opportunities for Jews of all backgrounds to discover their heritage." Its headquarters are in the Old City of Jerusalem. The government of Israel awarded it a piece of land facing the Western Wall.

The organization has "branches" or franchises in many cities around the world which contain large populations of Jews. Each branch has independent governance and funding.

In Jerusalem, the Aish HaTorah yeshiva offers both beginners' drop-in classes and full-time, intensive study programs for Jewish men and women of all backgrounds and levels of knowledge. Areas of study include Hebrew Bible, Talmud, Jewish history, Jewish philosophy, and Hebrew language ulpan. A US-accredited college, the yeshiva offers degrees to college and university age students.

The rabbinic ordination program combines classical Talmudic training with intensive instruction in outreach and leadership skills. Over 200 men have graduated from its rabbinic program, assuming leadership and religious roles in many Jewish communities around the world.

AISH HA TORAH

 

 

Meir : Middle Egypt / Asyut / Meir Meir A-1 : Middle Egypt / Asyut / Meir (Niankh-hpepy) ..... Ukhhotep, Tomb of : Middle Egypt / Asyut / Meir

EGYPTIAN SITES - INDEX

Meir lies at the edge of the cultivation, about 50km north-west of Asyut. The modern town of el-Qusiya, about 8km to the east of Meir, probably derives its name from the ancient Qis, classical Cusae during Graeco-Roman times. Although Qis was capital of the 14th Upper Egyptian nome, there are few remaining traces of the ancient town. It was in the necropolis at Meir that the provincial rulers, or nomarchs of the region were buried in tombs high in the hillside, with the more humble population further down the slope.

 

 

Sacred Geometry is the theory of dimensional evolution which assumes the ... door to his academy stating,

"Let no one unacquainted with geometry enter here.". ...
ezinearticles.com/?An-Overview-Of-Sacred-Geometry

 

AN OVERVIEW OF SACRED GEOMETRY

Gregg Hall

Sacred Geometry is the theory of dimensional evolution which assumes the universe is a living system kept together by the existence of a sacred geometry that encompasses the entire cosmos and makes for the blueprint for the mani-festation of what we know as our material universe and in addition organizes the context through which all love evolves.

Our universe was designed to be highly efficient and is capable of performing a wide range of multiple functions at the same time. The very same geometry which provides structure to physical reality also allows for the perceptual environments that people and civilizations must move through as part of a systematic learning process on the path towardsevolution.

Each dimension of this sacred geometry holds a unique place of perceptual space and a context of learning both for personal and social evolution. As each new dimension appears a new set of perceptions and potentials is awakened which we are free to accept and actualize or ignore. It is in understanding the dimensional structure which exists all around us that allows us to be able to understand the path and direction of personal and social evolution.

Even though our modern science generally believes there is nothing of deeper meaning to the dimensional geometry of the universe other than the actual physical aspects, there is a view that is almost diametrically opposed to this that began with the Greek philosopher Pythagoras in 500 B.C. Pythagoras believed and taught the theory or belief that all of the mathematical patterns in the universe were actually expressions of divine intelligence and signified a divine intention.

According to Pythagoras, we are surrounded by organizational intelligence that is shown in its purest from through mathematical formulas and musical harmonies and allowing ourselves to be at the center of our experience; we can know and share the organizing patterns and principles that pervade the universe. This is a thought that was even held by Albert Einstein, who stated that he received his greatest breakthroughs after praying and sleeping. The answers to the questions he was seeking came to him from the Universe while he slept! This is also the way that it can be explained for someone who is blind to be able to sculpt and for a deaf person, such as Beethoven to be able to compose intricate musical scores.

Plato, who taught over a hundred years after Pythagoras, continued in the teachings of Pythagorean thought in espousing that the universe or cosmos as Pythagoras termed it was a place of "harmonious and beautiful order" and placed such a high regard on geometry that he placed a sign above the door to his academy stating, "Let no one unacquainted with geometry enter here."

Sacred Geometry is the theory of dimensional evolution which assumes the ... door to his academy stating,

"Let no one unacquainted with geometry enter here.". ...
ezinearticles.com/?An-Overview-Of-Sacred-Geometry

 

 

AN OVERVIEW OF SACRED GEOMETRY

Gregg Hall

Sacred Geometry is the theory of dimensional evolution which assumes the universe is a living system kept together by the existence of a sacred geometry that encompasses the entire cosmos and makes for the blueprint for the mani-festation of what we know as our material universe and in addition organizes the context through which all love evolves

Plato, who taught over a hundred years after Pythagoras, continued in the teachings of Pythagorean thought in espousing that the universe or cosmos as Pythagoras termed it was a place of "harmonious and beautiful order" and placed such a high regard on geometry that he placed a sign above the door to his academy stating,

"Let no one unacquainted with geometry enter here."

 

SIGNALS WHAT SIGNALS

SIGNALS

OF

THAT THAT THAT

HOLY

ISISISIS

 

. . .

I

THAT I THAT

I

AM

ISISIS

THAT QUEST THAT

I

AM ON

O

NAMUH

THAT

DIVINE CREATORS CREATORS DIVINE

QUEST THAT THE HE AZIN SHE THAT IZ THEE THAT IZ ME IZ ON THAT QUEST

THAT

ISISIS

THAT

I THAT ME THAT I

THAT YOU THAT

I

THOUGHT

ME

YOU THAT YOU

THAT

DIVINE THOUGHT IS IS IS THOUGHT DIVINE

ISISIS EVERYTHING EVERYTHING ISISIS

I AM LIFE EVERLASTING EVERLASTING LIFE AM I

THEREFORE THOU ART EVERLASTING LIFE LIFE EVERLASTING ART THOU THEREFORE

 

 

2061

ODYSSEY THREE

Arthur C. Clarke 1987

Page 13 (number omitted)

"THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN"

 

 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

Thomas Mann 1924

Page 706

THE

THUNDERBOLT

 

 

WHY SMASH ATOMS

A. K. Solomon 1940

Page 77

"Once the fairy tale hero has penetrated the ring of fire round the magic mountain he is free to woo the heroine in her castle on the mountain top."

 

 

ROUNDANDROUNDROUNDANDROUNDROUNDANDROUNDROUND ANDROUNDROUNDANDROUND

 

 

AWAKE

August issue

NEWS FROM THE DIOCESE OF WAKEFIELD

Received With Thanks

Wakefield Cathedral 9/9/08 12-45 am

 

 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

Thomas Mann 1875-1955

Page 169

".........99.6.........."

Ninety-nine and six"

".........99.6.........."

 

 

THE MAGIC MOUNTAIN

Thomas Mann 1875-1955

Page 10

Number 34

Page 95

"Room 34"

 

 

I

AM HERE HERE AM

I

 

 

AWAKE

August issue

NEWS FROM THE DIOCESE OF WAKEFIELD

Received With Thanks

Wakefield Cathedral 9/9/08 12-45 am

 

 

THE CITIZEN

WAKEFIELD

City of Wakefield Metropolitan District Council

Issue 26 July/August 2006

THE PAPER FOR THE DISTRICT'S RESIDENTS

Page 11

"WOW What's On in Wakefield District"

"DIARY OF FORTHCOMING EVENTS"

 

 

FIRST CONTACT

THE SEARCH FOR EXTRA TERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

Edited by Ben Nova and Byron Preiss 1990

Page 256

"Two types of unexplained signals were detected during this search. The first kind is quite rare, with the best example being the 'Wow' signal found in 1977. This /Page 257/ name was unintenionally applied from Jerry Ehman's comments in the margin of the computer printout when he noticed the signal. The signal was unmistakably strong and had all the characteristics of an extra-terrestrial signal."

"We searched in the direction of the 'Wow!' signal hundreds of times after its discovery and over a wide frequency range. We never found the signal again.

"...the 'Wow signal was received only once..."

"What was the wow signal? Probably we will never know."

 

 

OF TIME AND STARS

Arthur C. Clarke 1972

The Sentinel

"I can never look now at the Milky Way without wondering from which of those banked clouds of stars the emissaries are coming. If you will pardon so commonplace a simile, we have set off the fire alarm and have nothing to do but wait.

I do not think we will have to wait for long."

 

 

FIRST CONTACT

THE SEARCH FOR EXTRA TERRESTRIAL INTELLIGENCE

Edited by Ben Nova and Byron Preiss 1990

Page 330

ANSWER PLEASE ANSWER

Ben Nova

Page 339

'Holy Mother of God'

Page 340

'They're sending out a signal'

Page 340

'It must be in some form of code . . . but a code that they feel can be easily cracked by anyone with enough intelligence to realize that there's a message there.'

 

 

GODS NUMBERS NUMBERS GODS

ZERO ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX SEVEN EIGHT NINE

ZE R O, T H+R+E+E, F, O+U, R, F I V+E, S I X, S, E+V, N, E, I, GHT, N, I, NE, = 9,9,9,9,9,9,9,9,9,9

 

 

GODS OF NUMBERS NUMBERS OF GODS

GOD GO DO GOOD GOOD DO GO GOD

GODGODOGOOD GOODDOGOGOD

 

 

EVOLVE LOVE EVOLVED LOVE IS LOVE EVOLVED LOVE EVOLVE

LOVE THE LIGHT THE LIGHT IS LOVE IS LIGHT THE LIGHT THE LOVE

LOVE ALL SENTIENT BEINGS BEINGS SENTIENT ALL LOVE

 

 

ALL SENTIENT LIFE ART THOU THAT I THAT ME THAT I THOU ART LIFE SENTIENT ALL

 

 

I

ME

ART

THOU ART THAT ART THOU

CREATORS ALL ALL CREATORS

THAT ART THOU THOU ART THAT

GOD SPIRIT ART THOU THOU ART GOD SPIRIT

MIND MATTER SPIRIT GOD SPIRIT MATTER MIND

THOU ART UNIVERSAL MIND GODS UNIVERSAL MIND ART THOU

 

 

Prakrti or Prakriti (from Sanskrit language प्रकृ्रति, prakṛti) is, ... Devi Prakriti Shakti in the context of Shaktis as forces unifies Kundalini, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prakrti

 

Prakrti From Wikipedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Prakrti or Prakriti (from Sanskrit language प्रकृ्रति, prakṛti) is, according to Vedanta philosophy, the basic matter of which the Universe consists. It is composed of the three gunas or modes, known as tamas (ignorance), rajas (passion) and sattva (goodness).

It is described in Bhagavad Gita as an inferior type of energy to the living beings (jivas), and to the Supreme Person (Paramatma or Bhagavan). It is closely associated with the concept of Maya within Vedic scripture.

Devi Prakriti Shakti in the context of Shaktis as forces unifies Kundalini, Kriya, Itcha, Para, Jnana, Mantrika Shaktis. Each is in a chakra.

Prakriti also means nature. Nature can be described as environment. It can also be used to denote the 'feminine' in sense of the 'male' being the purusha.

According to ayurveda our body is made up of three doshas kapha, pitta, vayu. The balance or imbalance of these doshas defines the prakriti of our body (besides Devi Prakriti in sahasrara chakra.)

 

 

Prakrti or Prakriti (from Sanskrit language प्रकृ्रति, prakṛti) is, ... Devi Prakriti Shakti in the context of Shaktis as forces unifies Kundalini, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prakrti
 
 
 
Prakrti From Wikipedia
 
 
 
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Prakrti or Prakriti (from Sanskrit language प्रकृ्रति, prakṛti) is, according to Vedanta philosophy, the basic matter of which the Universe consists. It is composed of the three gunas or modes, known as tamas (ignorance), rajas (passion) and sattva (goodness).
 
It is described in Bhagavad Gita as an inferior type of energy to the living beings (jivas), and to the Supreme Person (Paramatma or Bhagavan). It is closely associated with the concept of Maya within Vedic scripture.
 
Devi Prakriti Shakti in the context of Shaktis as forces unifies Kundalini, Kriya, Itcha, Para, Jnana, Mantrika Shaktis. Each is in a chakra.
 
Prakriti also means nature. Nature can be described as environment. It can also be used to denote the 'feminine' in sense of the 'male' being the purusha.
 
According to ayurveda our body is made up of three doshas kapha, pitta, vayu. The balance or imbalance of these doshas defines the prakriti of our body (besides Devi Prakriti in sahasrara chakra.)

 

 

 

The Vedic divinities are considered to be the human mind's interpretation of the many facets of Purusha. According to the Rigvedic Purusha sukta, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purusha

 

PurushaFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In Hinduism, Purusha (Sanskrit puruṣa, पुरुष "man, Cosmic Man", in Sutra literature also called puṃs "man") is the "self" which pervades the universe. The Vedic divinities are considered to be the human mind's interpretation of the many facets of Purusha. According to the Rigvedic Purusha sukta, Purusha was dismembered by the devas -- his mind is the Moon, his eyes are the Sun, and his breath is the wind.

In the Rigveda, Purusha is described as a primeval giant, not unlike the Norse Ymir[citation needed], that is sacrificed by the gods (see Purushamedha) and from whose body the world and the varnas (castes) are built. He is described as having a thousand heads and a thousand feet. He emanated Viraj, the female creative principle, from which he is reborn in turn before the world was made out of his parts.

In the sacrifice of Purusha, the Vedic chants were first created. The horses and cows were born, the Brahmins were made from Purusha's mouth, the Kshatriyas from his arms, the Vaishyas from his thighs, and the Shudras from his feet.[2] The Moon was born from his spirit, the Sun from his eyes, the heavens from his skull. Indra and Agni emerged from his mouth.

The parallel to Norse Ymir is often considered to reflect the myth's origin in Proto-Indo-European religion.

In Samkhya, a school of Hindu philosophy, Purusha is pure consciousness. It is thought to be our true identity, to be contrasted with Prakrti, or the material world, which contains all of our organs, senses, and intellectual faculties.

 

 

The Vedic divinities are considered to be the human mind's interpretation of the many facets of Purusha. According to the Rigvedic Purusha sukta, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purusha
 
 
 
PurushaFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
Jump to: navigation, search
 
In Hinduism, Purusha (Sanskrit puruṣa, पुरुष "man, Cosmic Man", in Sutra literature also called puṃs "man") is the "self" which pervades the universe. The Vedic divinities are considered to be the human mind's interpretation of the many facets of Purusha. According to the Rigvedic Purusha sukta, Purusha was dismembered by the devas -- his mind is the Moon, his eyes are the Sun, and his breath is the wind.
 
In the Rigveda, Purusha is described as a primeval giant, not unlike the Norse Ymir[citation needed], that is sacrificed by the gods (see Purushamedha) and from whose body the world and the varnas (castes) are built. He is described as having a thousand heads and a thousand feet. He emanated Viraj, the female creative principle, from which he is reborn in turn before the world was made out of his parts.
 
In the sacrifice of Purusha, the Vedic chants were first created. The horses and cows were born, the Brahmins were made from Purusha's mouth, the Kshatriyas from his arms, the Vaishyas from his thighs, and the Shudras from his feet.[2] The Moon was born from his spirit, the Sun from his eyes, the heavens from his skull. Indra and Agni emerged from his mouth.
 
The parallel to Norse Ymir is often considered to reflect the myth's origin in Proto-Indo-European religion.
 
In Samkhya, a school of Hindu philosophy, Purusha is pure consciousness. It is thought to be our true identity, to be contrasted with Prakrti, or the material world, which contains all of our organs, senses, and intellectual faculties.

 

 

Shakti, meaning sacred force, power, or energy, is the Hindu concept or personification of the divine feminine aspect, sometimes referred to as 'The Divine ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakti

Shakti, meaning sacred force, power, or energy, is the Hindu concept or personification of the divine feminine aspect, sometimes referred to as 'The Divine Mother'. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. In Shaktism, Shakti is worshiped as the Supreme Being. However, in other Hindu traditions of Shaivism and Vaishnavism, Shakti embodies the active feminine energy Prakriti of Purusha, who is Vishnu in Vaishnavism or Shiva in Shaivism. Vishnu's female counterpart is called Lakshmi, with Parvati being the female half of Shiva.

Contents[ hide]
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In traditional Shiva-associated Shaktism

Shaktism regards Devi (lit., "the Goddess") as the Supreme Brahman itself, the "one without a second", with all other forms of divinity, female or male, considered to be merely Her diverse manifestations. In the details of its philosophy and practice, Shaktism resembles Saivism. However, Shaktas (Sanskrit: Śakta, शक्त), practitioners of Shaktism, focus most or all worship on Shakti, as the dynamic feminine aspect of the Supreme Divine. Shiva, the masculine aspect of divinity, is considered solely transcendent, and Shiva's worship is generally relegated to an auxiliary role.[1]

In Vaishnavism

Like Shiva-associated Shaktism, Shakti embodies the active feminine energy and power of male supreme deity Vishnu in Vaishnavism. Vishnu's female counterpart is called Lakshmi. However, in Srivaishnavism, a school of Vaishnavism, Lakshmi or Sri does not play any particular part in the creative function of the Lord, because Prakriti is the manifest aspect of the Lord. [2] In Srivaishnavism, Vishnu alone is the great creator, although Sri is coeval with Him.[3] As Vishnu is the Father who stands for absolute justice, Sri is the Mother of the universe and is considered to be important element in the redemption of mankind, and is the interceder with Vishnu on behalf of spiritual seekers.[4]

In Smarta Advaita tradition

In the Smarta Advaita sect of Hinduism, Shakti is considered to be one of five equal bonafide personal forms of God in the panchadeva system advocated by Adi Shankara. [5]

Evolution

David Kinsley believes that the concept of "Shakti" may be derived from Lord Indra's consort Sachi (Indrani), meaning power.[6] Indrani is part of a group of seven or eight mother goddesses called the Matrikas (Brahmani, Vaishnavi, Maheshvari, Indrani, Kumari, Varahi and Chamunda and/or Narasimhi), who are considered shaktis of major Hindu gods(Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, Indra, Skanda, Varaha/Yama and Devi and Narasimha respectively).

The Shakti goddess is also known as Amma (meaning 'mother') in south India, especially in the states of Tamil Nadu,Kerala and Andhra Pradesh. There are many temples devoted to various incarnations of the Shakti goddess in most of the villages in South India. The rural people believe that Shakti is the protector of the village, the punisher of evil people, the curer of diseases, and the one who gives welfare to the village. They celebrate Shakti Jataras with a lot of hue and great interest once a year. Some examples of incarnations are Gangamma, Aarti, Kamakshamma, Kanakadurga, Mahalakshmammma, Meeenakshamma, Poleramma and Perantalamma.

 

 

Shakti, meaning sacred force, power, or energy, is the Hindu concept or personification of the divine feminine aspect, sometimes referred to as 'The Divine ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakti
 
Shakti, meaning sacred force, power, or energy, is the Hindu concept or personification of the divine feminine aspect, sometimes referred to as 'The Divine Mother'. Shakti represents the active, dynamic principles of feminine power. In Shaktism, Shakti is worshiped as the Supreme Being. However, in other Hindu traditions of Shaivism and Vaishnavism, Shakti embodies the active feminine energy Prakriti of Purusha, who is Vishnu in Vaishnavism or Shiva in Shaivism. Vishnu's female counterpart is called Lakshmi, with Parvati being the female half of Shiva.
 
Contents[ hide]
 
1 In traditional Shiva-associated Shaktism
 
2 In Vaishnavism
 
3 In Smarta Advaita tradition
 
4 Evolution
 
5 Shakti Peethas
 
6 Adi Shakti
 
7 Shakti force: Devi Prakriti
 
8 Standard representation
 
9 See also
 
10 Further reading
 
11 Notes
 
12 External links
 
 
 
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In traditional Shiva-associated Shaktism
 
Shaktism regards Devi (lit., "the Goddess") as the Supreme Brahman itself, the "one without a second", with all other forms of divinity, female or male, considered to be merely Her diverse manifestations. In the details of its philosophy and practice, Shaktism resembles Saivism. However, Shaktas (Sanskrit: Śakta, शक्त), practitioners of Shaktism, focus most or all worship on Shakti, as the dynamic feminine aspect of the Supreme Divine. Shiva, the masculine aspect of divinity, is considered solely transcendent, and Shiva's worship is generally relegated to an auxiliary role.[1]
 
 
 
In Vaishnavism
 
Like Shiva-associated Shaktism, Shakti embodies the active feminine energy and power of male supreme deity Vishnu in Vaishnavism. Vishnu's female counterpart is called Lakshmi. However, in Srivaishnavism, a school of Vaishnavism, Lakshmi or Sri does not play any particular part in the creative function of the Lord, because Prakriti is the manifest aspect of the Lord. [2] In Srivaishnavism, Vishnu alone is the great creator, although Sri is coeval with Him.[3] As Vishnu is the Father who stands for absolute justice, Sri is the Mother of the universe and is considered to be important element in the redemption of mankind, and is the interceder with Vishnu on behalf of spiritual seekers.[4]
 
 
 
In Smarta Advaita tradition
 
In the Smarta Advaita sect of Hinduism, Shakti is considered to be one of five equal bonafide personal forms of God in the panchadeva system advocated by Adi Shankara. [5]
 
 
 
Evolution
 
David Kinsley believes that the concept of "Shakti" may be derived from Lord Indra's consort Sachi (Indrani), meaning power.[6] Indrani is part of a group of seven or eight mother goddesses called the Matrikas (Brahmani, Vaishnavi, Maheshvari, Indrani, Kumari, Varahi and Chamunda and/or Narasimhi), who are considered shaktis of major Hindu gods(Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, Indra, Skanda, Varaha/Yama and Devi and Narasimha respectively).
 

The Shakti goddess is also known as Amma (meaning 'mother') in south India, especially in the states of Tamil Nadu,Kerala and Andhra Pradesh. There are many temples devoted to various incarnations of the Shakti goddess in most of the villages in South India. The rural people believe that Shakti is the protector of the village, the punisher of evil people, the curer of diseases, and the one who gives welfare to the village. They celebrate Shakti Jataras with a lot of hue and great interest once a year. Some examples of incarnations are Gangamma, Aarti, Kamakshamma, Kanakadurga, Mahalakshmammma, Meeenakshamma, Poleramma and Perantalamma.

 

 

Prana is a central concept in Ayurveda and Yoga where it is believed to flow through a network of fine subtle channels called nadis. ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prana

rana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Prana (प्राण, IAST: prāṇa) is the Sanskrit for "breath" (from the root prā "to fill", cognate to Latin plenus "full"). It is one of the five organs of vitality or sensation, viz. prana "breath", vac "speech", caksus "sight", shrotra "hearing", and manas "thought" (nose, mouth, eyes, ears and mind; ChUp. 2.7.1).

In Vedantic philosophy, it is the notion of a vital, life-sustaining force of living beings and vital energy, comparable to the Chinese notion of Qi. Prana is a central concept in Ayurveda and Yoga where it is believed to flow through a network of fine subtle channels called nadis. The Pranamaya-kosha is one of the five Koshas or "sheaths" of the Atman

Prana was first expounded in the Upanishads, where it is part of the worldly, physical realm, sustaining the body and the mother of thought and thus also of the mind. Prana suffuses all living form but is not itself the Atma or individual soul. In the Ayurveda, the Sun and sunshine are held to be a source of Prana.

Contents[hide]
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[edit] Nadis
Further information: Nadi (yoga)

In Yoga, the three main channels of prana are the Ida, the Pingala and the Sushumna. Ida relates to the left side of the body, terminating at the left nostril and pingala to the right side of the body, terminating at the right nostril. In some practices, alternate nostril breathing balances the prana that flows within the body. When prana enters a period of uplifted, intensified activity, the Yogic tradition refers to it as Pranotthana.[1]

[edit] The Five Pranas

In Ayurveda, the Prana is further classified into subcategories, referred to as pranas. According to Hindu philosophy these are the vital principles of basic energy and subtle faculties of an individual that sustain physiological processes. There are five pranas or vital currents in the Hindu system:[2]

  1. Prana : Responsible for the beating of the heart and breathing. Prana enters the body through the breath and is sent to every cell through the circulatory system.
  2. Apana : Responsible for the elimination of waste products from the body through the lungs and excretory systems.
  3. Udana : Responsible for producing sounds through the vocal apparatus, as in speaking, singing, laughing, and crying. Also it represents the conscious energy required to produce the vocal sounds corresponding to the intent of the being. Hence Samyama on udana gives the higher centers total control over the body.
  4. Samana : Responsible for the digestion of food and cell metabolism (ie. the repair and manufacture of new cells and growth). Samana also includes the heat regulating processes of the body. Auras are projections of this current. By meditational practices one can see auras of light around every being. Yogis who do special practise on samana can produce a blazing aura at will.
  5. Vyana : Responsible for the expansion and contraction processes of the body, eg. the voluntary muscular system.

[edit] Pranayama

Pranayama is the practice in which the control of prana is achieved (initially) from the control of one's breathing. According to Yogic philosophy the breath, or air, is merely a gateway to the world of prana and its manifestation in the body. In yoga, pranayama techniques are used to control the movement of these vital energies within the body, which is said to lead to an increase in vitality in the practitioner. The practice of these techniques is not trivial, and Kason (2000)[3] mentions circumstances where pranayama techniques might disrupt the balance of a person's life.

[edit] See also

[edit] References
  1. ^ Sovatsky, Stuart (1998) Words from the Soul: Time, East/West Spirituality, and Psychotherapeutic Narrative. Suny Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology, New York: State University of New York Press.
  2. ^ Rammurti S. Mishra Yoga Sutras : The Textbook of Yoga Psychology
  3. ^ Kason, Yvonne (2000) Farther Shores: Exploring How Near-Death, Kundalini and Mystical Experiences Can Transform Ordinary Lives. Toronto: HarperCollins Publishers; Revised edition.

[edit] External links

 

 

Prana is a central concept in Ayurveda and Yoga where it is believed to flow through a network of fine subtle channels called nadis. ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prana
 
 
 
Prana From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Prana (प्राण, IAST: prāṇa) is the Sanskrit for "breath" (from the root prā "to fill", cognate to Latin plenus "full"). It is one of the five organs of vitality or sensation, viz. prana "breath", vac "speech", caksus "sight", shrotra "hearing", and manas "thought" (nose, mouth, eyes, ears and mind; ChUp. 2.7.1).
 
In Vedantic philosophy, it is the notion of a vital, life-sustaining force of living beings and vital energy, comparable to the Chinese notion of Qi. Prana is a central concept in Ayurveda and Yoga where it is believed to flow through a network of fine subtle channels called nadis. The Pranamaya-kosha is one of the five Koshas or "sheaths" of the Atman
 
Prana was first expounded in the Upanishads, where it is part of the worldly, physical realm, sustaining the body and the mother of thought and thus also of the mind. Prana suffuses all living form but is not itself the Atma or individual soul. In the Ayurveda, the Sun and sunshine are held to be a source of Prana.
 
Contents[hide]
 
1 Nadis
 
2 The Five Pranas
 
3 Pranayama
 
4 See also
 
5 References
 
6 External links
 
 
 
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[edit] Nadis Further information: Nadi (yoga)
 
 
 
In Yoga, the three main channels of prana are the Ida, the Pingala and the Sushumna. Ida relates to the left side of the body, terminating at the left nostril and pingala to the right side of the body, terminating at the right nostril. In some practices, alternate nostril breathing balances the prana that flows within the body. When prana enters a period of uplifted, intensified activity, the Yogic tradition refers to it as Pranotthana.[1]
 
 
 
[edit] The Five Pranas In Ayurveda, the Prana is further classified into subcategories, referred to as pranas. According to Hindu philosophy these are the vital principles of basic energy and subtle faculties of an individual that sustain physiological processes. There are five pranas or vital currents in the Hindu system:[2]
 
Prana : Responsible for the beating of the heart and breathing. Prana enters the body through the breath and is sent to every cell through the circulatory system.
 
Apana : Responsible for the elimination of waste products from the body through the lungs and excretory systems.
 
Udana : Responsible for producing sounds through the vocal apparatus, as in speaking, singing, laughing, and crying. Also it represents the conscious energy required to produce the vocal sounds corresponding to the intent of the being. Hence Samyama on udana gives the higher centers total control over the body.
 
Samana : Responsible for the digestion of food and cell metabolism (ie. the repair and manufacture of new cells and growth). Samana also includes the heat regulating processes of the body. Auras are projections of this current. By meditational practices one can see auras of light around every being. Yogis who do special practise on samana can produce a blazing aura at will.
 
Vyana : Responsible for the expansion and contraction processes of the body, eg. the voluntary muscular system.
 
 
 
[edit] Pranayama Pranayama is the practice in which the control of prana is achieved (initially) from the control of one's breathing. According to Yogic philosophy the breath, or air, is merely a gateway to the world of prana and its manifestation in the body. In yoga, pranayama techniques are used to control the movement of these vital energies within the body, which is said to lead to an increase in vitality in the practitioner. The practice of these techniques is not trivial, and Kason (2000)[3] mentions circumstances where pranayama techniques might disrupt the balance of a person's life.
 
 
 
[edit] See also Vitalism
 
Lung_(Tibetan_Buddhism)
 
Energy (esotericism)
 
Shakti
 
Yoga Sutra
 
 
 
[edit] References ^ Sovatsky, Stuart (1998) Words from the Soul: Time, East/West Spirituality, and Psychotherapeutic Narrative. Suny Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology, New York: State University of New York Press.
 
^ Rammurti S. Mishra Yoga Sutras : The Textbook of Yoga Psychology
 
^ Kason, Yvonne (2000) Farther Shores: Exploring How Near-Death, Kundalini and Mystical Experiences Can Transform Ordinary Lives. Toronto: HarperCollins Publishers; Revised edition.
 
 
 
[edit] External links Prana - overview
 
Pranayama
 
Prana and Chakrams
 
 
 
 
Categories: Hindu philosophical concepts | Yoga | Sanskrit words and phrases | Vitalism

 

 

Pranayama (Sanskrit: prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit word meaning "lengthening of the prana or breath". The word is composed of two Sanskrit words, Prāna, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pranayama

 

Pranayama
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Image:Example.of.complex.text.rendering.svg This article contains Indic text.
Without rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes or other symbols instead of Indic characters; or irregular vowel positioning and a lack of conjuncts.

Pranayama (Sanskrit: prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit word meaning "lengthening of the prana or breath". The word is composed of two Sanskrit words, Prāna, life force, or vital energy, particularly, the breath, and "āyāma", to lengthen or extend. It is often translated as control of the life force (prana).[1][2][3][4] When used as a technical term in yoga, it is often translated more specifically as "breath control".[5][6][7] Literal translations include A. A. Macdonell's "suspension of breath"[8] and I. K. Taimni's "regulation of breath".[9]

The Qigong practice in China may also have its roots in Pranayama.[citation needed]

Contents[hide]
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[edit] Etymology

Pranayama (Devanagari: प्राणायाम, prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit compound.

V. S. Apte provides fourteen different meanings for the word prana (Devanagari: प्राण, prāṇa) including these:[10]

  • Breath, respiration
  • The breath of life, vital air, principle of life (usually plural in this sense, there being five such vital airs generally assumed, but three, six, seven, nine, and even ten are also spoken of)[11]
  • Energy, vigor
  • The spirit or soul

Of these meanings, the concept of "vital air" is used by Bhattacharyya to describe the concept as used in Sanskrit texts dealing with pranayama.[12] Thomas McEvilley translates "prana" as "spirit-energy".[13]

Monier-Williams defines the compound prāṇāyāma as (m., also pl.) "N. of the three 'breath-exercises' performed during Saṃdhyā (See pūraka, recaka, kumbhaka"[14][15] This technical definition refers to a particular system of breath control with three processes as explained by Bhattacharyya: pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it).[16] There are also other processes of pranayama in addition to this three-step model.[17]

Macdonell gives the etymology as prāṇa + āyāma and defines it as "m. suspension of breath (sts. pl.)".[18]

Apte's definition of āyāmaḥ derives it from ā + yām and provides several variant meanings for it when used in compounds. The first three meanings have to do with "length", "expansion, extension", and "stretching, extending", but in the specific case of use in the compound prāṇāyāma he defines āyāmaḥ as meaning "restrain, control, stopping".[19]

An alternative etymology for the compound is cited by Ramamurti Mishra, who says that:

"Expansion of individual energy into cosmic energy is called prāṇāyāma (prāṇa, energy + ayām, expansion)."[20]

The word "yama" (Devanagari: याम, yāma) means "cessation"[21][22] or more generally "control" or "restraint".[23][24]

[edit] Hatha and Raja Yoga Varieties

Some scholars distinguish between hatha and raja yoga varieties of pranayama, with the former variety usually prescribed for the beginner. According to Taimni, hatha yogic pranayama involves manipulation of pranic currents through breath regulation for bringing about the control of chitta-vrittis and changes in consciousness, whereas raja yogic pranayama involves the control of chitta-vrittis by consciousness directly through the will of the mind.[25] Students qualified to practice pranayama are therefore always initiated first in the techniques of hatha pranayama.[26]

[edit] Bhagavad Gita

Pranayama is mentioned in verse 4.29 of the Bhagavat Gita.[27]

[edit] Quotes

Prana is a subtle invisible force. It is the life-force that pervades the body. It is the factor that connects the body and the mind, because it is connected on one side with the body and on the other side with the mind. It is the connecting link between the body and the mind. The body and the mind have no direct connection. They are connected through Prana only and this Prana is different from the breathing you have in your physical body.

Swami Chidananda Saraswati[28]

Yoga works primarily with the energy in the body, through the science of pranayama, or energy-control. Prana means also ‘breath.’ Yoga teaches how, through breath-control, to still the mind and attain higher states of awareness. The higher teachings of yoga take one beyond techniques, and show the yogi, or yoga practitioner, how to direct his concentration in such a way as not only to harmonize human with divine consciousness, but to merge his consciousness in the Infinite.

Paramahansa Yogananda[29]

[edit] Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Pranayama is the fourth 'limb' of the eight limbs of Raja Yoga mentioned in verse 2.29 in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.[30][31] Patanjali discusses his specific approach to pranayama in verses 2.49 through 2.51, and devotes verses 2.52 and 2.53 to explaining the benefits of the practice.[32] Patanjali refers to pranayama as the control of life force that comes as a result of practicing the various breathing techniques, rather than the numerous breathing exercises themselves.[33][29]

Many yoga teachers advise that pranayama should be part of an overall practice that includes the other limbs of Patanjali's Raja Yoga teachings, especially Yama, Niyama, and Asana.[34]

[edit] Medical claims

Several researchers have reported that pranayama techniques are beneficial in treating a range of stress related disorders,[35] improving autonomic functions,[36] relieving symptoms of asthma,[37][38] and reducing signs of oxidative stress.[39][40] Practitioners report that the practice of pranayama develops a steady mind, strong will-power, and sound judgement,[34] and also claim that sustained pranayama practice extends life and enhances perception.[41]

[edit] Cautions

Many yoga teachers recommend that pranayama techniques be practiced with care, and that advanced pranayama techniques should be practiced under the guidance of a teacher. These cautions are also made in traditional Hindu literature.[42][43] [44]

[edit] See also

 

 
Pranayama (Sanskrit: prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit word meaning "lengthening of the prana or breath". The word is composed of two Sanskrit words, Prāna, ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pranayama
 
 
 
Pranayama From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Jump to: navigation, search
 
 
 
This article contains Indic text.
Without rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes or other symbols instead of Indic characters; or irregular vowel positioning and a lack of conjuncts.
 
 
 
Pranayama (Sanskrit: prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit word meaning "lengthening of the prana or breath". The word is composed of two Sanskrit words, Prāna, life force, or vital energy, particularly, the breath, and "āyāma", to lengthen or extend. It is often translated as control of the life force (prana).[1][2][3][4] When used as a technical term in yoga, it is often translated more specifically as "breath control".[5][6][7] Literal translations include A. A. Macdonell's "suspension of breath"[8] and I. K. Taimni's "regulation of breath".[9]
 
The Qigong practice in China may also have its roots in Pranayama.[citation needed]
 
Contents[hide]
 
1 Etymology 1.1 Hatha and Raja Yoga Varieties
 
1.2 Bhagavad Gita
 
1.3 Quotes
 
 
 
2 Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
 
3 Medical claims
 
4 Cautions
 
5 See also
 
6 Notes 6.1 References
 
 
 
// if (window.showTocToggle) { var tocShowText = "show"; var tocHideText = "hide"; showTocToggle(); } //
 
[edit] Etymology Pranayama (Devanagari: प्राणायाम, prāṇāyāma) is a Sanskrit compound.
 
V. S. Apte provides fourteen different meanings for the word prana (Devanagari: प्राण, prāṇa) including these:[10]
 
Breath, respiration
 
The breath of life, vital air, principle of life (usually plural in this sense, there being five such vital airs generally assumed, but three, six, seven, nine, and even ten are also spoken of)[11]
 
Energy, vigor
 
The spirit or soul
 
 
 
Of these meanings, the concept of "vital air" is used by Bhattacharyya to describe the concept as used in Sanskrit texts dealing with pranayama.[12] Thomas McEvilley translates "prana" as "spirit-energy".[13]
 
Monier-Williams defines the compound prāṇāyāma as (m., also pl.) "N. of the three 'breath-exercises' performed during Saṃdhyā (See pūraka, recaka, kumbhaka"[14][15] This technical definition refers to a particular system of breath control with three processes as explained by Bhattacharyya: pūraka (to take the breath inside), kumbhaka (to retain it), and recaka (to discharge it).[16] There are also other processes of pranayama in addition to this three-step model.[17]
 
Macdonell gives the etymology as prāṇa + āyāma and defines it as "m. suspension of breath (sts. pl.)".[18]
 
Apte's definition of āyāmaḥ derives it from ā + yām and provides several variant meanings for it when used in compounds. The first three meanings have to do with "length", "expansion, extension", and "stretching, extending", but in the specific case of use in the compound prāṇāyāma he defines āyāmaḥ as meaning "restrain, control, stopping".[19]
 
An alternative etymology for the compound is cited by Ramamurti Mishra, who says that:
 
"Expansion of individual energy into cosmic energy is called prāṇāyāma (prāṇa, energy + ayām, expansion)."[20]
 
 
 
The word "yama" (Devanagari: याम, yāma) means "cessation"[21][22] or more generally "control" or "restraint".[23][24]
 
 
 
[edit] Hatha and Raja Yoga Varieties Some scholars distinguish between hatha and raja yoga varieties of pranayama, with the former variety usually prescribed for the beginner. According to Taimni, hatha yogic pranayama involves manipulation of pranic currents through breath regulation for bringing about the control of chitta-vrittis and changes in consciousness, whereas raja yogic pranayama involves the control of chitta-vrittis by consciousness directly through the will of the mind.[25] Students qualified to practice pranayama are therefore always initiated first in the techniques of hatha pranayama.[26]
 
 
 
[edit] Bhagavad Gita Pranayama is mentioned in verse 4.29 of the Bhagavat Gita.[27]
 
 
 
[edit] Quotes Prana is a subtle invisible force. It is the life-force that pervades the body. It is the factor that connects the body and the mind, because it is connected on one side with the body and on the other side with the mind. It is the connecting link between the body and the mind. The body and the mind have no direct connection. They are connected through Prana only and this Prana is different from the breathing you have in your physical body.
 
– Swami Chidananda Saraswati[28]
 
 
 
Yoga works primarily with the energy in the body, through the science of pranayama, or energy-control. Prana means also ‘breath.’ Yoga teaches how, through breath-control, to still the mind and attain higher states of awareness. The higher teachings of yoga take one beyond techniques, and show the yogi, or yoga practitioner, how to direct his concentration in such a way as not only to harmonize human with divine consciousness, but to merge his consciousness in the Infinite.
 
– Paramahansa Yogananda[29]
 
 
 
[edit] Yoga Sutras of Patanjali Pranayama is the fourth 'limb' of the eight limbs of Raja Yoga mentioned in verse 2.29 in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.[30][31] Patanjali discusses his specific approach to pranayama in verses 2.49 through 2.51, and devotes verses 2.52 and 2.53 to explaining the benefits of the practice.[32] Patanjali refers to pranayama as the control of life force that comes as a result of practicing the various breathing techniques, rather than the numerous breathing exercises themselves.[33][29]
 
Many yoga teachers advise that pranayama should be part of an overall practice that includes the other limbs of Patanjali's Raja Yoga teachings, especially Yama, Niyama, and Asana.[34]
 
 
 
[edit] Medical claims Several researchers have reported that pranayama techniques are beneficial in treating a range of stress related disorders,[35] improving autonomic functions,[36] relieving symptoms of asthma,[37][38] and reducing signs of oxidative stress.[39][40] Practitioners report that the practice of pranayama develops a steady mind, strong will-power, and sound judgement,[34] and also claim that sustained pranayama practice extends life and enhances perception.[41]
 
 
 
[edit] Cautions Many yoga teachers recommend that pranayama techniques be practiced with care, and that advanced pranayama techniques should be practiced under the guidance of a teacher. These cautions are also made in traditional Hindu literature.[42][43] [44]
 
 
 
[edit] See also Ujjayi breath
 
Anuloma pranayama
 
Hatha yoga
 
Raja yoga

 

 

Kundalini is considered a part of the subtle body along with chakras (energy centres) and nadis (channels). The overall concept has many points in common ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kundalini

Kundalini
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The references used in this article may be clearer with a different or consistent style of citation, footnoting, or external linking.
This article cites its sources but does not provide page references.
You can improve this article by introducing citations that are more precise.

Kundalini (kuṇḍalinī कुण्डलिनी) Sanskrit, literally "coiled". In Indian yoga, a "corporeal energy"[1] - an unconscious, instinctive or libidinal force or Shakti, envisioned either as a goddess or else as a sleeping serpent coiled at the base of the spine,[2][3][4] hence a number of English renderings of the term such as 'serpent power'. Kundalini is considered a part of the subtle body along with chakras (energy centres) and nadis (channels). The overall concept has many points in common with Chinese acupuncture.

Yoga and Tantra propose that this energy may be "awakened" by such means as austerities, breath and other physical exercises, visualization and chanting. It may then rise up a subtle channel at the spine (called Sushumna) to the head, bringing psychological illumination. Each chakra is said to contain special characteristics.[5] Yogis tend to attempt this alone, Tantrics in couples, both usually under the instruction of a guru.

When Kundalini Shakti is conceived as a goddess, then, when it rises to the head, it unites itself with the Supreme Being (Lord Shiva). The aspirant becomes engrossed in deep meditation and infinite bliss.[6][7]

Contents[hide]
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[edit] Indian sources

A number of models of this esoteric subtle anatomy occur in the class of texts known as Āgamas or Tantras, a large body of scriptures, rejected by many orthodox brahmins.[8] In early texts there are various systems of chakras and nadis, with varying connections between them. Over time a system of six or seven chakras up the spine was adopted by most schools. This particular system, which may have originated in about the 11th century AD, rapidly became widely popular.[9] This is the conventional arrangement cited by Monier-Williams, where the chakras are defined as "6 in number, one above the other".[10]

The most famous of the Yoga Upanishads, the Yogatattva, mentions four kinds of yoga, one of which, laya-yoga, involves Kundalini.[11] Another source text for the concept is the Hatha Yoga Pradipika written by Swami Svatmarama (English translation, 1992) somewhere between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries.[12][citation needed]

[edit] Western interpretation

Sir John Woodroffe (pen name Arthur Avalon) was one of the first to bring the notion of Kundalini to the West. A High Court Judge in Calcutta, he became interested in Shaktism and Hindu Tantra. His translation of and commentary on two key texts was published as The Serpent Power. Woodroffe rendered Kundalini as "Serpent Power".

Western awareness of the idea of Kundalini was strengthened by the Theosophical Society and the interest of the psychoanalyst Carl Jung (1875-1961)[2]. "Jung's seminar on Kundalini yoga, presented to the Psychological Club in Zurich in 1932, has been widely regarded as a milestone in the psychological understanding of Eastern thought. Kundalini yoga presented Jung with a model for the development of higher consciousness, and he interpreted its symbols in terms of the process of individuation".[13]

In the early '30s two Italian scholars, Tommaso Palamidessi and Julius Evola, published several books with the intent of re-interpreting alchemy with reference to yoga.[14] Those works had an impact on modern interpretations of Alchemy as a mystical science. In those works, Kundalini is called an Igneous Power or Serpentine Fire.

Another popularizer of the concept of Kundalini among Western readers was Gopi Krishna. His autobiography is entitled Kundalini—The Evolutionary Energy in Man.[15] According to June McDaniel, his writings have influenced Western interest in kundalini yoga.[16] Swami Sivananda produced an English language manual of Kundalini Yoga methods. Other well-known spiritual teachers who have made use of the idea of kundalini include Osho, George Gurdjieff, Paramahansa Yogananda, Rudi (Swami Rudrananda), Yogi Bhajan and Nirmala Srivastava.

Kundalini references may commonly be found at present in a wide variety of derivative "New Age" presentations. Stuart Sovatsky warns that the popularization of the term within new religious movements has not always contributed to a mature understanding of the concept.[17]

Recently, there has been a growing interest within the medical community to study the physiological effects of meditation, and some of these studies have applied the discipline of Kundalini Yoga to their clinical settings.[18][19] Their findings are not all positive. Researchers in the fields of Humanistic psychology,[20] Transpersonal psychology,[21] and Near-death studies[22][23] describe a complex pattern of sensory, motor, mental and affective symptoms associated with the concept of Kundalini, sometimes called the Kundalini Syndrome.[24]

Lukoff, Lu & Turner[25][citation needed] notes that a number of psychological difficulties might be associated with Asian spiritual practices, and that Asian traditions recognize a number of pitfalls associated with intensive meditation practice. Transpersonal literature[26] also notes that kundalini practice is not without dangers. Anxiety, dissociation, depersonalization, altered perceptions, agitation, and muscular tension have been observed in western meditation practitioners[27] and psychological literature is now addressing the occurrence of meditation-related problems in Western contemplative life.[28][29]

Some modern experimental research [30]seeks to establish links between Kundalini practice and the ideas of Wilhelm Reich and his followers.

[edit] See also

 

 

Kundalini is considered a part of the subtle body along with chakras (energy centres) and nadis (channels). The overall concept has many points in common ... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kundalini
 
Kundalini From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Jump to: navigation, search
 
 
 
The references used in this article may be clearer with a different or consistent style of citation, footnoting, or external linking.
 
 
 
This article cites its sources but does not provide page references.
You can improve this article by introducing citations that are more precise.
 
 
 
Kundalini (kuṇḍalinī कुण्डलिनी) Sanskrit, literally "coiled". In Indian yoga, a "corporeal energy"[1] - an unconscious, instinctive or libidinal force or Shakti, envisioned either as a goddess or else as a sleeping serpent coiled at the base of the spine,[2][3][4] hence a number of English renderings of the term such as 'serpent power'. Kundalini is considered a part of the subtle body along with chakras (energy centres) and nadis (channels). The overall concept has many points in common with Chinese acupuncture.
 
Yoga and Tantra propose that this energy may be "awakened" by such means as austerities, breath and other physical exercises, visualization and chanting. It may then rise up a subtle channel at the spine (called Sushumna) to the head, bringing psychological illumination. Each chakra is said to contain special characteristics.[5] Yogis tend to attempt this alone, Tantrics in couples, both usually under the instruction of a guru.
 
When Kundalini Shakti is conceived as a goddess, then, when it rises to the head, it unites itself with the Supreme Being (Lord Shiva). The aspirant becomes engrossed in deep meditation and infinite bliss.[6][7]
 
Contents[hide]
 
1 Indian sources
 
2 Western interpretation
 
3 See also
 
4 Notes
 
5 References
 
6 Further reading
 
7 External links
 
 
 
// if (window.showTocToggle) { var tocShowText = "show"; var tocHideText = "hide"; showTocToggle(); } //
 
[edit] Indian sources A number of models of this esoteric subtle anatomy occur in the class of texts known as Āgamas or Tantras, a large body of scriptures, rejected by many orthodox brahmins.[8] In early texts there are various systems of chakras and nadis, with varying connections between them. Over time a system of six or seven chakras up the spine was adopted by most schools. This particular system, which may have originated in about the 11th century AD, rapidly became widely popular.[9] This is the conventional arrangement cited by Monier-Williams, where the chakras are defined as "6 in number, one above the other".[10]
 
The most famous of the Yoga Upanishads, the Yogatattva, mentions four kinds of yoga, one of which, laya-yoga, involves Kundalini.[11] Another source text for the concept is the Hatha Yoga Pradipika written by Swami Svatmarama (English translation, 1992) somewhere between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries.[12][citation needed]
 
 
 
[edit] Western interpretation Sir John Woodroffe (pen name Arthur Avalon) was one of the first to bring the notion of Kundalini to the West. A High Court Judge in Calcutta, he became interested in Shaktism and Hindu Tantra. His translation of and commentary on two key texts was published as The Serpent Power. Woodroffe rendered Kundalini as "Serpent Power".
 
Western awareness of the idea of Kundalini was strengthened by the Theosophical Society and the interest of the psychoanalyst Carl Jung (1875-1961)[2]. "Jung's seminar on Kundalini yoga, presented to the Psychological Club in Zurich in 1932, has been widely regarded as a milestone in the psychological understanding of Eastern thought. Kundalini yoga presented Jung with a model for the development of higher consciousness, and he interpreted its symbols in terms of the process of individuation".[13]
 
In the early '30s two Italian scholars, Tommaso Palamidessi and Julius Evola, published several books with the intent of re-interpreting alchemy with reference to yoga.[14] Those works had an impact on modern interpretations of Alchemy as a mystical science. In those works, Kundalini is called an Igneous Power or Serpentine Fire.
 
Another popularizer of the concept of Kundalini among Western readers was Gopi Krishna. His autobiography is entitled Kundalini—The Evolutionary Energy in Man.[15] According to June McDaniel, his writings have influenced Western interest in kundalini yoga.[16] Swami Sivananda produced an English language manual of Kundalini Yoga methods. Other well-known spiritual teachers who have made use of the idea of kundalini include Osho, George Gurdjieff, Paramahansa Yogananda, Rudi (Swami Rudrananda), Yogi Bhajan and Nirmala Srivastava.
 
Kundalini references may commonly be found at present in a wide variety of derivative "New Age" presentations. Stuart Sovatsky warns that the popularization of the term within new religious movements has not always contributed to a mature understanding of the concept.[17]
 
Recently, there has been a growing interest within the medical community to study the physiological effects of meditation, and some of these studies have applied the discipline of Kundalini Yoga to their clinical settings.[18][19] Their findings are not all positive. Researchers in the fields of Humanistic psychology,[20] Transpersonal psychology,[21] and Near-death studies[22][23] describe a complex pattern of sensory, motor, mental and affective symptoms associated with the concept of Kundalini, sometimes called the Kundalini Syndrome.[24]
 
Lukoff, Lu & Turner[25][citation needed] notes that a number of psychological difficulties might be associated with Asian spiritual practices, and that Asian traditions recognize a number of pitfalls associated with intensive meditation practice. Transpersonal literature[26] also notes that kundalini practice is not without dangers. Anxiety, dissociation, depersonalization, altered perceptions, agitation, and muscular tension have been observed in western meditation practitioners[27] and psychological literature is now addressing the occurrence of meditation-related problems in Western contemplative life.[28][29]
 
Some modern experimental research [30]seeks to establish links between Kundalini practice and the ideas of Wilhelm Reich and his followers.
 
 
 
[edit] See also Kaula
 
Kundalini Yoga
 
Prana
 
Qi
 
Qigong
 
Samādhi
 
 
 
Pranotthana
 
Shaktipat
 
Taoist sexual practices
 
Tummo
 
Turiya
 
Peak experience
 

 

 

In 1769 Herder wrote a critique of the work Genius seculi by the philologist Christian Adolph Klotz (German Wikipedia article) and introduced the word ...
www.answers.com/topic/zeitgeist

Zeitgeist is originally a German expression that means "the spirit (Geist) of the time (Zeit)". It denotes the intellectual and cultural climate of an era. The German pronunciation of the word is [ˈtsa͡ɪtga͡ɪst] (IPA). The concept of Zeitgeist goes back to the German philosopher Johann Gottfried Herder. In 1769 he wrote a critique of the work Genius seculi by the philologist Christian Adolph Klotz (German Wikipedia article) and introduced the word Zeitgeist into German as a translation of genius seculi (Latin: genius - "g

 

 

In 1769 Herder wrote a critique of the work Genius seculi by the philologist Christian Adolph Klotz (German Wikipedia article) and introduced the word ...
www.answers.com/topic/zeitgeist

Dictionary: Zeitgeist    (tsīt'gīst', zīt'-)
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Zeitgeist Definition
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n.

The spirit of the time; the taste and outlook characteristic of a period or generation: “It's easy to see how a student . . . in the 1940's could imbibe such notions. The Zeitgeist encouraged Philosopher-Kings” (James Atlas).

[German : Zeit, time (from Middle High German zīt, from Old High German) + Geist, spirit; see poltergeist.]


  Literary Dictionary: Zeitgeist

Zeitgeist [tsyt‐gyst], the German word for ‘time‐spirit’, more often translated as ‘spirit of the age’. It usually refers to the prevailing mood or attitude of a given period.

 

The spirit of the times; the dominant beliefs of a particular period. The term is usually applied to the study of literature, but it has also been applied to sport (for example, in connection with the current belief that winning is all that matters).

 
Obscure Words: zeitgeist


the general intellectual, moral and cultural climate of an era
 
Wikipedia: zeitgeist

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This article is about the German word. For other uses, see Zeitgeist (disambiguation).

Zeitgeist (pronounced [ˈtsa͡ɪtga͡ɪst] (help·info)) is originally a German expression that means "the spirit of the age", literally translated as "time (Zeit) spirit (Geist)". It describes the intellectual and cultural climate of an era. In German, the word has more layers of meaning than the English translation, including the fact that Zeitgeist can only be observed for past events.

Zeitgeist has achieved a unique status among German loanwords in other tongues, having found an entrance into English, Spanish and Japanese.

Origins

The concept of Zeitgeist goes back to Johann Gottfried Herder and other German Romantics such as Cornelius Jagdmann, but is best known in relation to Hegel's philosophy of history. In 1769 Herder wrote a critique of the work Genius seculi by the philologist Christian Adolph Klotz (German Wikipedia article) and introduced the word Zeitgeist into German as a translation of genius seculi (Latin: genius - "guardian spirit" and saeculi - "of the century").

The German Romantics, habitually tempted to reduce the past to essences, treated the Zeitgeist as an historical character in its own right, rather than a generalized description for an era.

Definitions

"Zeitgeist" refers to the ethos of a select group of people, that express a particular (predominantly post-modern) world view, which is prevalent at a particular period of socio-cultural progression.

Zeitgeist is the experience of a dominant cultural climate that defines, particularly in Hegelian thinking, an era in the dialectical progression of a people or the world at large. Hegel's main contribution to the formulation of the concept of Volksgeist is the attribution of a historical character to the concept. The spirit of a nation is one of the manifestations of "World Spirit" (Weltgeist). That Spirit is essentially alive and active throughout mankind's history. Now, the spirit of a nation is an intermediate stage of world history as the history of the World Spirit. The World Spirit gives impetus to the realization of the historical spirits of various nations (Volksgeister').

The spirits of individual nations are both the articulations (Gliederungen) of an organization and its realization. The spirits of individual nations represent a segment of the World Spirit out of which emerges the unlimited universal spirit. A comparison is introduced here between the status of an individual and that of a nation's spirit. In the process of his formation the individual undergoes various changes without, however, losing his identity. As a part of world history, a nation—exhibiting a certain trend expressed in its Volksgeist— plays its part in the total process of world history. But once it contributes its share to world history it can no longer play a role in the process of world history. The submersion in the total process prevents a people's cultural rebirth, because it has exhausted its creativity in the historical growth of its guiding spirit. It is for this reason that one of Hegel's disciples, Michelet, considered the idea of a renaissance of the Jewish people as philosophically impossible.

Quotations
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  • Whoever marries the zeitgeist will be a widower soon. - August Everding
  • Opinions, that deviate from the ruling zeitgeist, always aggravate the crowd. - Germaine de Staël
  • The product of paper and printed ink, that we commonly call the book, is one of the great visible mediators between spirit and time, and, reflecting zeitgeist, lasts as long as ore and stone. - Johann Georg Hamann
  • Ohh, spirit of the age - crusher, Peter Godfrey
  • Don't take any shit from the zeitgeist. - comedian George Carlin
  • You exist in the Zeitgeist with a cane, sir. - Debbie DeLaguardia, speaking to president Bartlet in the seventh season of The West Wing.
  • Jittery Zeitgeist wither by the watering hole. - Aesop Rock from his track None Shall Pass on his recently released album, None Shall Pass.

 

 

DAILY STAR

Monday, October 13 2008

Page 15

ALIENS WILL LAND HERE TOMORROW EXPERTS SAY THAT PROOF IS OUT THERE

by Gemma Wheatley

ALIENS are set to land on Earth tomorrow to prove to humans that there really is life out there. Extra-terrestrials will make- a grand entrance to our planet by flying across our skies in a space craft that will be visible for three days, experts said.
The internet was buzzing with claims that the strange alien aircraft could even land after it appears over the American desert.
So many people reckon the rumour is true, bookies have stopped takin. bets on the UFO prediction after an unprecedented rush.
William Hill spokesman Rupert Adams said: "This is the first time that an internet phenotnenon has affected our business."
American psychic Blossom Goodchild sparked the frenzy after claiming aliens informed her of their plans.
Bookies are set to lose militoris of pounds if E.T.'s pals do approach our planet. Mr Adams added: "We now have seven-figure
liabilities if the ship does appear and we have decided to duck any more big bets until October 14 has passed, hopefully without
incident."

LOVE

Blossom claimed that aliens have announced that one of their craft will appear in our skies tomorrow as a way of proving to us the existence of other life forms in the universe.
She said they

"come in love to help us and our planet move to a new higher vibration of love". And one UFO blogger wrote: "Stockpile some foods, water and first aid supplies. Be ready to welcome our visitors.
"Be kind to your neighbours who may not understand.
"Be welcoming and greet the visitors with love. What an exciting time."

The news comes as a leading European UFO expert claims he is about to reveal the most significant alien proof ever recorded, filmed over the last six months in Turkey

Haknua Attogan, from the.Sirius UFO Space Science Research Center said:"The images captured are expected to have a tremendous impact throughout the world and could he listed as the most important UFO and extra-terrestrial images ever filmed in all the world"

Akdogan will reveal the footage at the UFO Data Magazine Annual Conference at the end of the month. For details visit ufodata.co.uk.

 

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

 

 

SHOCK AND AWE RAW WAR SHOCK AND AWE AWFUL WAR

 

 

The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln and one of the most quoted speeches in United States history. ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gettysburg_Address

"The Gettysburg Address is a speech by U.S. President Abraham Lincoln and one of the most quoted speeches in United States history.[1][2][3] It was delivered at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the afternoon of Thursday, November 19, 1863, during the American Civil War, four and a half months after the Union armies defeated those of the Confederacy at the decisive Battle of Gettysburg.

Abraham Lincoln's carefully crafted address, secondary to other presentations that day, came to be regarded as one of the greatest speeches in American history. In just over two minutes, Lincoln invoked the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and redefined the Civil War as a struggle not merely for the Union, but as "a new birth of freedom" that would bring true equality to all of its citizens, and that would also create a unified nation in which states' rights were no longer dominant.

Beginning with the now-iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago...", Lincoln referred to the events of the Civil War and described the ceremony at Gettysburg as an opportunity not only to consecrate the grounds of a cemetery, but also to dedicate the living to the struggle to ensure that "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth"."

 

 

"Despite the speech's prominent place in the history and popular culture of the United States, the exact wording of the speech is disputed. The five known manuscripts of the Gettysburg Address differ in a number of details and also differ from contemporary newspaper reprints of the speech."

 

"Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation, so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate—we can not consecrate—we can not hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that governmen of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

 

 

I

CLAIM NOT TO HAVE

CONTROLLED EVENTS BUT CONFESS PLAINLY THAT EVENTS HAVE CONTROLLED

ME

 

-
-
-
-
-
ABRAHAM
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
LINCOLN
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
1
I
9
9
9
C
=
3
Q
5
CLAIM
38
20
2
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
4
T
=
2
Q
2
TO
35
8
8
H
=
8
-
4
HAVE
36
18
9
C
=
3
Q
10
CONTROLLED
118
46
1
E
=
5
-
6
EVENTS
85
22
4
B
=
2
-
3
BUT
43
7
7
C
=
3
-
7
CONFESS
81
27
9
P
=
7
-
7
PLAINLY
89
35
8
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
E
=
5
-
6
EVENTS
85
22
4
H
=
8
-
4
HAVE
36
18
9
C
=
3
-
10
CONTROLLED
118
46
1
M
=
4
-
2
ME
18
9
9
-
-
69
-
74
First Total
889
313
88
-
-
6+9
-
7+4
Add to Reduce
8+8+9
3+1+3
8+8
Q
-
15
Q
11
Second Total
25
7
16
-
-
1+5
-
1+1
Reduce to Deduce
2+5
-
1+6
-
-
6
-
2
Essence of Number
7
7
7

 

IT MAY SEEM STRANGE THAT ANY MEN SHOULD DARE ASK A JUST

GODS

ASSISTANCE IN RINGING THEIR BREAD FROM THE SWEAT OF OTHER MENS FACES

 

-
-
-
-
-
ABRAHAM
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
LINCOLN
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IT
29
11
2
M
=
4
Q
3
MAY
39
12
3
S
=
1
-
4
SEEM
42
15
6
S
=
1
Q
7
STRANGE
84
30
3
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
A
=
1
Q
3
ANY
40
13
4
M
=
4
-
3
MEN
32
14
5
S
=
1
-
6
SHOULD
79
25
7
D
=
4
-
4
DARE
28
19
1
A
=
1
-
3
ASK
31
4
4
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
J
=
1
-
4
JUST
70
7
7
G
=
7
-
4
GODS
45
18
9
A
=
1
-
10
ASSISTANCE
110
29
2
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
W
=
5
Q
8
WRINGING
101
56
2
T
=
2
-
5
THEIR
60
33
6
B
=
2
-
5
BREAD
30
21
3
F
=
6
-
4
FROM
52
25
7
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
S
=
1
-
5
SWEAT
68
14
5
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
O
=
6
-
5
OTHER
66
30
3
M
=
4
-
4
MENS
51
15
6
F
=
6
-
5
FACES
34
16
7
-
-
87
-
106
First Total
1218
462
111
-
-
8+7
-
1+0+6
Add to Reduce
1+2+1+8
4+6+2
1+1+1
Q
-
15
Q
7
Second Total
14
12
3
-
-
1+5
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+4
1+2
-
-
-
6
-
7
Essence of Number
5
3
3

 

 

BUT LET US JUDGE NOT THAT WE BE NOT JUDGED

 

-
-
-
-
-
ABRAHAM
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
LINCOLN
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
B
=
2
-
3
BUT
43
7
7
L
=
3
Q
3
LET
37
10
1
U
=
3
-
2
US
40
4
4
J
=
1
Q
5
JUDGE
47
20
2
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
4
T
=
2
Q
4
THAT
49
13
4
W
=
5
-
2
WE
28
10
1
B
=
2
-
2
BE
7
7
7
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
1
J
=
1
Q
6
JUDGED
51
24
6
-
-
29
-
33
First Total
400
121
40
-
-
2+9
-
3+3
Add to Reduce
4+0+0
1+2+1
4+0
Q
-
11
Q
6
Second Total
4
4
4
-
-
1+1
-
-
Reduce to Deduce
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
6
Essence of Number
4
4
4

 

 

THE

TWENTIETH OF JANUARY TWO THOUSAND AND NINE

INAUGERATION OF BARACK OBAMA AS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
6
SYSTEM
101
20
2

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
7
SYSTEMS
120
21
3
10
Add to Reduce
153
36
9
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+5+3
3+6
-
1
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

10
CAPITALISM
103
40
4

 

 

1
I
9
9
9
3
SAY
45
9
9
4
THIS
92
47
2
8
THINKING
92
47
2
4
THAT
49
13
4
7
FUCKING
71
35
8
7
FUCKERS
83
29
2
7
FUCKING
71
35
8
6
FUCKED
50
23
5
4
FUCK
41
14
5
2
ME
18
9
9
4
YOUR
79
25
7
5
RIGHT
62
35
8
1
I
9
9
9
7
THOUGHT
99
36
9
4
WHAT
52
16
7
2
DO
19
10
1
3
YOU
61
16
7
5
THINK
62
26
8

 

 

THOUGHT NEGATIVE BALANCING POSITIVE THOUGHT

THOUGHT POSITIVE BALANCING NEGATIVE THOUGHT

FIRST LAW GODS LAW FIRST

 

 

10
CAPITALIST
110
38
2
7
SYSTEMS
120
21
3
2
OF
21
12
3
10
GOVERNMENT
133
52
7

 

 

3
THE
33
15
6
4
HIGH
32
32
5
12
INDIFFERENCE
98
71
8
19
First Total
163
118
19
1+9
Add to Reduce
1+6+3
1+1+8
1+9
10
Second Total
10
10
10
1+0
Reduce to Deduce
1+0
1+0
1+0
1
Essence of Number
1
1
1

 

 

I

THAT

AM

DIVINE BREATH BREATH DIVINE

THAT

AM

I

 

 

PRANA O PRANA

BREATH NAROPA NAROPA BREATH

PRANAYAMAPRANAYAMA

PRANA YAMA PRANA

YAMA

MAYA YAMA MAYA

 

-
-
-
-
-
HOLY BIBLE
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Scofield References
-
-
-
C
1
Verses
 
1-10
SAINT JOHN
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
C
1
Verse
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
B
=
2
-
9
BEGINNING
81
54
9
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
4
WORD
60
15
6
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
4
WORD
60
15
6
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
W
=
5
-
4
WITH
60
24
6
G
=
7
Q
3
GOD
26
17
8
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
4
WORD
60
15
6
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
G
=
7
Q
3
GOD
26
17
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
2
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
S
=
1
-
4
SAME
38
11
2
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
B
=
2
-
9
BEGINNING
81
54
9
W
=
5
-
4
WITH
60
24
6
G
=
7
Q
3
GOD
26
17
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
3
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
T
=
2
-
6
THINGS
77
23
5
W
=
5
-
4
WERE
51
24
6
M
=
4
-
4
MADE
23
14
5
B
=
2
-
2
BY
60
15
6
H
=
8
-
3
HIM
30
21
3
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
W
=
5
-
7
WITHOUT
116
35
8
H
=
8
-
3
HIM
30
21
3
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
4
A
=
1
Q
8
ANYTHING
98
44
8
M
=
4
-
4
MADE
23
14
5
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
M
=
4
-
4
MADE
23
14
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
4
-
-
-
-
-
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
H
=
8
-
3
HIM
30
21
3
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
L
=
3
-
4
LIFE
49
13
4
A
=
1
Q
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
L
=
3
-
4
LIFE
49
13
4
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
L
=
3
-
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
M
=
4
Q
3
MEN
26
17
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
5
-
-
-
-
-
A
=
1
Q
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
L
=
3
-
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
S
=
1
-
7
SHINETH
83
38
2
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
D
=
4
-
8
DARKNESS
91
28
1
A
=
1
Q
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
D
=
4
-
8
DARKNESS
91
28
1
C
=
3
-
12
COMPREHENDED
110
65
2
I
=
9
Q
2
IT
29
11
2
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
6
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
5
THERE
56
29
2
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
M
=
4
-
3
MAN
28
10
1
S
=
1
-
4
SENT
33
15
6
F
=
6
Q
4
FROM
52
25
7
G
=
7
Q
3
GOD
26
17
8
W
=
5
-
5
WHOSE
70
25
7
N
=
5
-
4
NAME
43
7
7
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
J
=
1
-
4
JOHN
56
20
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
7
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
S
=
1
-
4
SAME
38
11
2
C
=
3
-
4
CAME
22
13
4
F
=
6
-
3
FOR
39
21
3
A
=
1
-
1
A
1
1
1
W
=
5
-
7
WITNESS
109
28
1
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
B
=
2
-
4
BEAR
26
17
8
W
=
5
-
7
WITNESS
109
28
1
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
L
=
3
-
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
A
=
1
-
3
ALL
25
7
7
M
=
4
-
3
MEN
32
14
5
T
=
2
-
3
THROUGH
97
43
7
H
=
8
-
3
HIM
30
21
3
M
=
4
-
5
MIGHT
57
30
3
B
=
2
-
7
BELIEVE
60
33
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
8
-
-
-
-
-
H
=
8
-
2
HE
13
13
4
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
4
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
L
=
3
-
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
B
=
2
-
3
BUT
43
7
7
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
S
=
1
-
4
SENT
58
13
4
T
=
2
-
2
TO
35
8
8
B
=
2
-
4
BEAR
26
17
8
W
=
5
-
7
WITNESS
109
28
1
O
=
6
-
2
OF
21
12
3
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
L
=
3
-
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
9
-
-
-
-
-
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
T
=
2
-
4
TRUE
64
19
1
L
=
3
-
5
LIGHT
56
29
2
W
=
5
-
5
WHICH
51
33
6
L
=
3
-
8
LIGHTETH
89
44
8
E
=
5
-
5
EVERY
75
30
3
M
=
4
-
3
MAN
28
10
1
T
=
2
-
4
THAT
49
13
4
C
=
3
-
6
COMETH
64
28
1
I
=
9
-
3
INTO
58
22
4
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
5
WORLD
72
27
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Verse
10
-
-
-
-
-
H
=
8
-
2
HE
13
4
4
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
I
=
9
-
2
IN
23
14
5
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
5
WORLD
72
27
9
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
5
WORLD
72
27
9
W
=
5
-
3
WAS
43
7
7
M
=
4
-
4
MADE
23
14
5
B
=
2
-
2
BY
27
9
9
H
=
8
-
3
HIM
30
21
3
A
=
1
-
3
AND
19
10
1
T
=
2
-
3
THE
33
15
6
W
=
5
-
5
WORLD
72
27
9
K
=
2
-
4
KNEW
53
17
8
H
=
8
-
3
HIM
30
21
3
N
=
5
-
3
NOT
49
13
4
-
-
550
-
540
First Total
6291
2502
684
-
-
5+5+0
-
2+5+2
Add to Reduce
6+2+9+1
2+5+0+2
6+8+4
Q
-
10
Q
9
Second Total
18
9
18
-
-
1+0
Q
-
Reduce to Deduce
1+8
-
1+8
-
-
1
-
9
Essence of Number
9
9
9

 

 

THE ARK OF THE COVENANT

THE LIGHT IS RISING RISING IS THE LIGHT

 

 

19
THE ARC OF THE COVENANT
203
86
23
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
THE ARK OF THE COVENANT
-
-
-
3
THE
33
15
6
3
ARK
30
12
2
2
OF
21
12
3
3
THE
33
15
6
8
COVENANT
94
31
4
19
THE ARK OF THE COVENANT
211
85
4
1+9
-
2+0+3
8+6
2+3
10
THE ARK OF THE COVENANT
5
14
5
1+0
-
-
1+4
-
1
THE ARK OF THE COVENANT
5
5
5

 

 

-
19
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
6
-
-
5
-
5
-
+
=
38
3+8
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
15
-
-
14
-
14
-
+
=
74
7+4
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
19
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
5
-
1
9
2
-
-
6
-
2
-
5
-
3
-
4
5
-
1
-
2
+
=
47
4+7
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
-
20
-
5
-
1
18
11
-
-
6
-
20
-
5
-
3
-
22
5
-
1
-
20
+
=
137
1+3+7
=
11
1+1
2
=
2
-
19
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
20
8
5
-
1
18
11
-
15
6
-
20
8
5
-
3
15
22
5
14
1
14
20
+
=
211
2+1+1
=
4
=
4
=
4
-
-
2
8
5
-
1
9
2
-
6
6
-
2
8
5
-
3
6
4
5
5
1
5
2
+
=
85
8+5
=
13
1+3
4
=
4
-
19
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
1
occurs
x
2
=
2
=
2
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2
-
-
2
occurs
x
4
=
8
=
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3
occurs
x
1
=
3
=
3
-
-
-
-
-
-
--
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
occurs
x
1
=
4
=
4
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
5
-
-
-
5
occurs
x
5
=
25
2+5
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
occurs
x
3
=
18
1+8
9
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
occurs
x
2
=
16
1+6
7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
9
occurs
x
1
=
9
=
9
7
19
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
38
-
-
19
-
85
-
49
-
1+9
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
-
-
-
5
5
-
5
-
-
-
3+8
-
-
1+9
-
8+5
-
4+9
7
10
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
11
-
-
10
-
13
-
13
-
1+0
2
8
5
-
1
9
2
-
6
6
-
2
8
5
-
3
6
4
5
5
1
5
2
-
-
1+1
-
-
1+0
-
1+3
-
1+3
7
1
T
H
E
-
A
R
K
-
O
F
-
T
H
E
-
C
O
V
E
N
A
N
T
-
-
2
-
-
1
-
4
-
4

 

 

19
THE ARK OF THE COVENANT
211
85
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
THE ARC OF THE COVENANT
-
-
-
3
THE
33
15
6
3
ARC
22
13
4
2
OF
21
12
3
3
THE
33
15
6
8
COVENANT
94
31
4
19
THE ARC OF THE COVENANT
203
86
23
1+9
-
2+0+3
8+6
2+3
10
THE ARC OF THE COVENANT
5
14
5
1+0
-
-
1+4
-
1
THE ARC OF THE COVENANT
5
5
5

 

 

 
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