7 PHARAOH - PYRAMID 7
 
So Even
SEVENS
 
AZAZAZAZAZAZAZAZAZ
 
GENESIS OF THE GRAIL KINGS
Laurence Gardner 1998
THE COAT OF MANY COLOURS


Page176

The Sojourn in Egypt


"According to the book of Genesis (46-47), Abraham's grandson Jacob-Israel took his extended family (
seventy members in all) from Canaan into Egypt, where they settled in the region of Goshen by the Nile delta. There, escaping an initial famine in Canaan, they remained and multi- plied (Exodus 1 :7) through a number of generations until they were eventually led out of Egypt by Moses. The standard chronology of Ussher maintains that Jacob's original move into Egypt from Canaan was in 1706 BC, with the Mosaic exodus occurring 215 years later in 1491 BC.14
In apparent confirmation of the Israelites' sojourn in Egypt, the annals of Pharaoh Ramesses II (the Great) make reference to Semitic people who were settled in the delta region of Goshen, but this does not really help because they are not specified as Israelites. The Semites of the region (then as today) were not simply the Israelites, but included the Arab races of Syria, Phoenicia, Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent in general15 (see Chart: The Descents from Lamech and Noah, pp.244-45). Apart from mentioning Semitic people in Goshen, the records of Ramesses II (along with those of his predecessor Seti I) also refer to the town of Asher in Canaan.16 But, Asher (Joshua 1
7:7) was named after one of the tribes of Israel who returned with the Mosaic exodus (Numbers 1:41), thereby indicating that the exodus must have taken place before the reign ofSeti (c. 1333-1304 BC).
The book of Genesis (47: I1
) states that, in Egypt, the Israelites were settled in the land of Ramesses, while Exodus (I: II) claims that they actually built the city of Ramesses (Pi-Ramesses). But Ramesses I did not reign until c.1335 BC, and Ramesses II not until c.1304 BCI7 - practically two centuries after the Israelites had supposedly vacated his country according to Ussher. In fact, it was impossible for Jacob and his family to have settled in the land of Ramesses because they arrived in Egypt many centuries before the reign of Ramesses I.
 
It is almost as though we have awakened into the daylight of history from a long and troubled sleep, and yet continue to be disturbed by the faint but haunting echoes of our dreams."
Alizzed engineers, the sense of did you view  
Hearing this, the Zed AlizZed exteriorized an idee fixe.

P
Y
R
A
M
I
D














16
25
18
1
13
9
4


+
=
86
8+6
=
14
1+4
=
5


ADD



1+6


2+5


1+8



1+3














TO


7
7
9
1
4
9
4


+
=
41
4+1
=
5




5
REDUCE


















+
+



P
H
A
R
A
O
H














16
8
1
18
1
15
8


+
=
67
6+7
=
13


1+3

=
4


REDUCE



1+6



1+8



1+5













TO


7
8
1
9
1
6
8


+
=
40
4+0
=
4




4
DEDUCE

















=
9
9
NINE
9

 
THAT
Pharaoh sows a fair straight row writ the scribe.
 
P
Y
R
A
M
I
D












16
25
18
1
13
9
4


+
=
86
8+6
=
14


















+





P
H
A
R
A
O
H












16
8
1
18
1
15
8


+
=
67
6+7
=
13

















=
27


2+7

=
NINE



 THAT
Pharaoh sows a fair far row said the scribe.
P
Y
R
A
M
I
D















16
25
18
1
13
9
4


+
=
86


8+6
=
14
1+4
=
5




7
7
9
1
4
9
4


+
=


41
4+1
=
5


=


5













+
+






+
+



P
H
A
R
A
O
H















16
8
1
18
1
15
8


+
=
67


6+7
=
13


1+3

=
4




7
8
1
9
1
6
8


+
=


40
4+0
=
4




4












=


153






















81


8+1

=
9



9
9
NINE
9

 
One hundred and fifty three said Zed Aliz smelt as in fish. The scribe misspelt smelt, azin fish .
 
P
Y
R
A
M
I
D












16
25
18
1
13
9
4


+
=
86
8+6
=
14


















+





P
H
A
R
A
O
H












16
8
1
18
1
15
8


+
=
67
6+7
=
13

















=
27


2+7

=
NINE



 
The scribes writ Pi' ra' mid and then in subtl
P
Y
R
A
M
I
D






7
7
9
1
4
9
4


+
=


41













P
H
A
R
A
O
H






7
8
1
9
1
6
8


+
=


40












81

 
The scribes writ Pi' ra' mid and then in subtle aside writ Pi Ramesses
Five the midway point between four and nine writ the scribe
The wah good brother continues the straight line path of the turning circle.
Did the scribe misaspell Ptah, said the scribe
Thus writ that far yonder scribe.
 

 

SORCERY
Wade Haskins 1974
Foreword


" Signs, symbols, archetypes, correspondences-between the visible and the invisible, the microcosm and the macrocosm -testify to the persistence in the deepest oceans of the mind of an age-old longing to achieve through magic a goal still beyond the reach of science. That goal is a coherent view of man and his universe. Drawn together from many different sources and presented in this book in simple, down-to-earth terms are thousands of fascinating items relating to the art of manipulating the forces that control the universe.
All the entries are arranged alphabetically and cross-in-dexed to provide ready access to the wide variety of mate-rials associated with sorcery. Frequently further references are supplied at the end of an entry. In most instances the reader can find additional information on a subject by referring to the names or expressions mentioned in a par-ticular entry.
Sorcery, as used in this book, embraces the world of the supernatural and the precepts or practices through which men through the ages have sought to dominate their uni-verse. Universal and timeless, sorcery appealed to primitive minds, to the earliest literate thinkers, and to occult philoso- phers from Hellenistic times through the Middle Ages and into the modern era...."

Page 188

Egyptian Incantations .

Magic tablets of ancient Egypt contain charms and incanta-tions for various purposes. An incantation against dangerous animals reads:

Come to me, 0 Lord of Gods!
Drive far from me the lions- coming from the earth, the

/ Page 189 /

crocodiles issuing from the river, the mouth of all biting
reptiles coming out of their holes!
Stop, crocodile Mako, son of Set!
Do not wave thy tail:
Do not work thy two arms: Do not open thy mouth.
May water become as a burning fire before thee!
The spear of the seventy-seven gods is on thine eyes:
The arm of the seventy-seven gods is on thine eyes:
Thou who wast fastened with metal claws to the bark of
Ra, .
Stop, crocodile Mako, son of Set!
Another contains a series of names referring to magically transfigured names of the gods Osiris and Seth:
0 Oualbpaga!
0 Kammara!
0 Kamalo!
0 Karhenmon!
0 Amagaaa!
 


 

THE
MAGIKALALPHABET



















5
E
G
Y
P
T














5
7
25
16
20


+
=
73
7+3
=
10
1+0
=
1




5
7
7
7
2


+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
=
1
ONE
1




















E
G
Y
P
T














5




2


+
=
7











7
7
7



+
=
21












2+5
1+6
2+0














5
7
25
16
20













5
E
G
Y
P
T














5
7
25
16
20


+
=
73
7+3
=
10
1+0
=
1






2+5
1+6


2+0
















7
7
2














5
7





+
=
12
1+2
=
3







5
7
7
7
2


+
=
28
2+8
=
10
1+0
=
1
ONE
1

 
 
THE NEW ELIZABETHAN REFERENCE DICTIONARY


Page 729 /

I


I (I), i, the ninth letter and the third vowel in the English alphabet (pl. Is, I's), has two principal sounds: long, as in bind, find; short, as in fin, bin, win, etc.; and three minor sounds: (I) as in dirk (derk), (2) as in intrigue (in treg'), apd (3) the con-sonantal sound of y, as in behaviour (be hi' vyer), onion (Un' yon).
I (2) (i) [A.-S. ic (cp. Dut. ik, Icel. ek, G. ich, L. ego, Gr. ego)J, nom. sing. 1st pers. pron. (obj. me, poss. my; pl. nom. we, obj. us, poss. our) In speaking or writing denotes oneself. n. (Metaph.) The self-conscious subject; the ego.
*I (3) [AYE (I)].


Page
729

. . . 7 +2 + 9 = 18 . . . 1+8 = 9

"I (I), i, the ninth letter"


 
/ Page 730 /

 
i
ambus (i am' bus) [L., from Gr. iambos, an iambic verse, a lampoon, from iaptein, to assail], n. (pl. -buses) (Pros.) A poetic foot of one short and one long, or one unaccented and one accented syllable. iamb (i' amb), n. An iambus. iambic (i am' bik), a. Of or pertaining to the iambus; composed of iambics; n. An iambic foot; an iambic verse. *iamblcally, adv. iambist, n. iamblze, v.t. iambo- grapher (-bog' ra fer), n. A writer of iambics.

 

The Complete Book Of
FORTUNE
1988


Page 269 /

THE SCIENCE OF NUMBERS


" WE know that all things in the universe are subjected to rule. The movements of the planets, the sequence of .the seasons, and the structure of physical bodies are not deter-mined by chance or by coincidence but by mathematical laws. A knowledge of these enables the scientist to foretell certain occurrences, Thus the astronomer can predict when a comet will be seen, when the sun will be eclipsed, or when the full moon will shine.
In effect, it may be said that the whole universe is governed by numbers, and, since this is so, we may naturally conclude that human beings are no exception to Nature's laws. It is the science of numerology which applies the laws of mathematics to mankind, and teaches the art of interpreting those numbers by which the character of an individual is influenced.
The ancient Egyptians attached great importance to the significance of numbers and employed them as a means of fore-telling the future; but it is chiefly to the Greeks and the Hebrews that we owe the foundation of modern numerology. Pythagoras, the Greek mathematician and philosopher, stated that "Numbers are the first things of all of Nature," and believed that all natural phenomena could be reduced to terms of geometry and arithmetic. He founded a school of philosophy on this doctrine, his followers being known as the Pythagoreans. The Hebrews, from a set of beliefs called the "Cabbala "-those tenets "received by tradition" -associated certain numbers with letters of their alphabet, and thus formed the basis of the interpretation of names.
In numerology, the art of which can be very quickly mastered, we are concerned with the reduction of everything under considera- tion to the form of an arithmetical figure. The figure can then be interpreted by reference to the traditional meanings of numbers. These interpretations are older than history; they date back to the time when the dawning intelligence of primitive man first visualized the meaning of number and associated it with a spiritual significance.

/ Page 270 /

The revelations of character which can be obtained by means of numerology are not infallible, for what science can claim to account for all the wonders and vagaries of Nature? Yet general indications can nearly always be obtained from the interpretation of numbers, which will give us a clear indication of the part we play in the harmonious arrangement of the wonderful universe.

PRIMARY NUMBERS AND THEIR MEANINGS


Before we proceed farther with this study, it should be under-stood that figures themselves are merely signs which represent an idea of number. Numerology is not concerned with the outward appearance of these signs, but with the meanings of the numbers which they represent.
An Egyptian sage, an Ancient Hebrew, a philosopher of classic Greece, each made a different sign when he wanted to convey the idea of the number
3. But each one thought of the same number. Because of this we have been able to apply various interpretations from ancient writings in the Egyptian, Hebrew and Greek to our own numbers, which are Arabic in origin. Numbers are, in fact, a universal language, for they are understood by all rational persons of every race on earth.
Many systems of numerology are in existence, but the one which is considered here, and which springs from the most ancient and reliable source, is based chiefly on the nine primary numbers. These are represented by the figures
1 to 9 inclusive. The cipher, or 0, such as is contained in the number 10, has no tangible significance and, therefore, is not considered. The figure 10 is a form of 1, with certain modifications of which we shall learn later.
All numbers which are greater than
9 can be reduced to one of the primary numbers. Consider the number 26; to reduce it to a primary number we must add together the digits of which it is composed. thus 2+6 = 8. We see, therefore, that 26 reduces to
the primary number
8. In the same way 44 = 4 + 4 = 8; 21 = 2+1 = 8; 63 = 6+3 = 9; 98 = 9+8 = 17 = 1+7 = 8; and 789 = 7+8+9 = 24 = 2+4 = 6. This is the method we must use throughout for reducing large numbers to primary ones."