SAVANT SYNDROME

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hope
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SAVANT SYNDROME

Post by hope » 04 May 2019 15:54

Savant syndrome is a condition in which someone with significant mental disabilities
demonstrates certain abilities far in excess of average. The skills at which savants excel are generally related
to memory. This may include rapid calculation, artistic ability, map making, or musical ability.

Usually just one special skill is present. Those with the condition generally have a 'neurodeveopmental disorder
such as autism spectrum disorder or have a brain injury.
About half of the cases are associated with autism and may be known as "autistic savants".

While the condition usually becomes apparent in childhood, some cases may develop later in life.
It is not recognised as an disorder within the DSM-5.

The condition is rare. One estimate is that it affects about one in a million people.
Cases of female savants are even less common than those of males. The first medical of
the condition was in 1783.
Among those with autism 1 in 10 to 200 have savant syndrome to some degree.

It is estimated that there are fewer than a hundred savants with extraordinary skills currently living.
Kim Peek, was an inspiration in the Rain Man, the character played by Dustin Hoffman in the movie.
Out of ten other known savants, the one that is incredible is Daniel Tammet - The boy with the incredible
brain.

Daniel, 29, is a highly functional autistic savant with exceptional mathematical and language abilities.

Daniel first became famous when he recited from memory Pi to22,514 decimal places to raise funds for
National Society for Epilepsy.

Numbers to Daniel, are special to him. He has a rare form of synesthesia and sees each integers up to
10,000 as having their own shapes, colour, texture and feel. He can "see" the result of a math calculation
and he can "sense" whether a number is prime.

Daniel has since drawn "what pi looks like" a rolling landscape full of different shapes and colours.
Daniel speaks 11 languages, one of which is Icelandic.


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